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Battlefield photo
Battlefield

China bans Battlefield 4


Surprise, surprise
Dec 28
// Harry Monogenis
I remember browsing the Origin store a few days ago to see if EA was going to at least try and compete with Steam's Holiday Sale when I came across the Battlefield 4: China Rising expansion in the 'New Releases' sec...
Call of Duty: Online photo
Call of Duty: Online

Call of Duty: Online throws robot zombies into the mix


Not robots and zombies, robot zombies
Dec 02
// Brett Makedonski
Call of Duty: Online -- the Chinese-exclusive, free-to-play, online only title -- has a new trailer. The fact that it exists isn't necessarily significant; the fact that it contains menacing robot zombies is most certai...
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China officially lifting game console ban


Videogames for everybody
Sep 27
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Back in July we saw that China was looking to lift the videogame console ban. And now it's finally going to happen. The catch is that companies must make the consoles in the new free-trade zone of Shanghai. China's highest de...
Microsoft photo
Microsoft

Microsoft to expand presence in China with joint venture


Game console reportedly in the works
Sep 23
// Jordan Devore
Microsoft and BesTV plan to start a joint venture in China that will develop games and related services called E-Home Entertainment Development, reports Xinhua. The news originated from the Shanghai Stock Exchange, where BesT...
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Nintendo Vs. EVO, GTA V on PC & New Mystery IPs!


The Destructoid Show passes out in the hot, hot sun
Jul 12
// Max Scoville
Today's Destructoid Show tackles the big issues today: Nintendo got in a fight with the Fighting Game Community, then announced Captain Olimar, the Pikmin guy is gonna be in Super Smash Bros IV. Ninja Theory shows off a...
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It looks like China may finally lift the game console ban


There's a catch though
Jul 10
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The sale of videogame consoles have been banned in China for 13 years now, but it looks like that's all about to change according to South China Morning Post. The catch? Companies like Sony, Nintendo, and Microsoft must manuf...
Contra on iOS photo
Contra on iOS

Know what's a great idea? A Contra remake for iOS


EVOLUTION
Jun 01
// Tony Ponce
A few months ago, Chinese developer PunchBox Studios unleashed upon the Asian market Contra: Evolution, an iOS remake of the original NES classic that adds touch controls, in-app purchases, and high-definition graphics. Kona...
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Sega testing Transformers: Human Alliance in China


New arcade game goes to China first
May 09
// Dale North
Sega plans to test out a new arcade game in China first. Not in the U.S. or Japan. China. And get this: It's a Transformers game! As you'd imagine, there's not much information out for Transformers: Human Alliance at thi...
Final Fantasy IV bootleg photo
Final Fantasy IV bootleg

Final Fantasy IV, the Chinese Famicom demake


The world's only multi-cart Famicom game!?
May 04
// Tony Ponce
The world of Chinese bootleg software is a fascinating one. Sometimes, these wares go beyond mere copies to exhibit a healthy amount of sheer effort. You are no doubt aware of the Famicom demake of Final Fantasy VII, which t...

Play Age of Wushu free, plus $20 in items with this code

Apr 18 // Papa Niero
[embed]251706:48125:0[/embed] [embed]251706:48123:0[/embed]
Code Giveaway photo
Free codes for all
This week Destructoid is sponsored by Age of Wushu, a brand new free-to-play martial arts-themed MMORPG. The game takes you through 2,000 years of Wuxia history focused on leveling your individual fighting styles, s...

Monster Hunter Online photo
Monster Hunter Online

CryENGINE 3-powered Monster Hunter MMO coming to China


I'm sorry, were you interested in playing this?
Apr 18
// Tony Ponce
Dying for some true "next-gen" monster hunting and are not satisfied with a mere remastered up-port? Put your worries to bed, because here comes Monster Hunter Online, an exciting new PC installment powered by CryENGINE 3 an...
Jet Li is a badass photo
Jet Li is a badass

Jet Li says games can be as demanding as physical sports


Jet Li likes videogames, and that makes everything better
Apr 04
// Tony Ponce
Rigorous physical conditioning. Intense focus. Years of training and discipline to turn himself into a living weapon. Yeah, Jet Li is a textbook badass. But who could have expected that a man like him would offer such a ringi...
Chinese GamePad photo
Chinese GamePad

Chinese Wii U GamePad clone is better than the real thing


JXD S7300 GamePad 2 has some nifty features that trounce Nintendo's controller
Mar 05
// Tony Ponce
China made a knock-off a consumer electronics device? Whoa! Jane, get me off this crazy thing! In truth, it's not surprising that the Chinese copied the look and style of yet another gaming console or portable -- anyone up f...
LoL restaurant  photo
LoL restaurant

China gets a League of Legends restaurant


Of course, it's completely unofficial
Feb 20
// Fraser Brown
China is the land where dreams become a reality. Well, at least if you dream small and don't mind bootlegs. A couple of days ago, a League of Legends-themed restaurant opened its doors to the masses in Chongquing, China. ...
Scott Pilgrim photo
Scott Pilgrim

Scott Pilgrim was made in a mere five months


But DLC takes over two years? Go figure
Feb 05
// Tony Ponce
The unfolding saga of Scott Pilgrim vs. the World's second set of DLC is pure comedy. Over two years since the original DLC and still Ubisoft can't ship it out on time. Maybe if you hadn't stolen pixel art from Sonic Battle o...
Consoles in China? photo
Consoles in China?

Rumor: China might consider lifting ban on game consoles


Approval would be needed from seven ministries
Jan 28
// Jordan Devore
For those of us so embedded in gaming and the surrounding culture, it can be difficult to imagine what a governmental ban on game consoles would look like in practice. Gamers living in China don't have to imagine, however -- ...
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This Pikachu will give you nightmares


Wait until you see the rest of the cast
Nov 12
// Dale North
The most busted Pokemon ever were found earlier this month at China's Wenzhou International Animation Festival. This horrendous Pikachu and other Pokemon statues were displayed at the event as art, says Rocketnews24, along wi...
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These Mario-themed 3DS XL designs for China look great


I'll take the red-and-white one
Nov 01
// Jordan Devore
I didn't think I was one to normally get jealous about region-specific console designs, but there's no denying the appeal of these 3DS XL designs heading to China (via Tiny Cartridge). They'll be launching in December with Super Mario 3D Land and Mario Kart 7 pre-installed, though it's not like that matters for the majority of us. For what it's worth, do you have a preference between the three?
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If Super Mario were a Chinese kung fu crime drama...


Oct 08
// Tony Ponce
... it would probably look just like this. Girard Tecson of Dayside Productions wanted to make a Super Mario fan film in a style that hadn't been done before. Tapping the talents of the Team PTX fight choreography group, he ...
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These are the saddest photos you'll see all week


Aug 17
// Tony Ponce
In the Shunqing District of Nanchong City, China, the police have confiscated around 1000 gambling machines and set them ablaze. I understand the need to crack down on illegal gambling, but couldn't the machines have been rep...
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Android device rips Vita design, has a stupid name


Jul 25
// Dale North
What would you name an Android-based tablet with game controls that rips the PlayStation Vita's design? Surely not "Droid X360," right?  This Android 4.0 little tablet in a Vita-like case has that silly name etched on th...
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A new agreement between Activision Blizzard and Chinese ISP Tencent will bring Call of Duty Online to Chinese gamers. COD Online has been in development for two years now, designed specifically for the Chinese market. When i...

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Chinese telco Tencent invests in Epic Games


Jun 19
// Dale North
Today it was announced that Chinese telecommunications and internet company Tencent Holdings has acquired a minority stake in Epic Games. This is being called a strategic investment. Epic will continue to work independently, ...
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Man buys virtual sword for unreleased game, pays $16,000


Dec 29
// Jim Sterling
A man in China has spent $16,000 buying a digital sword for a game that hasn't been released. Age of Wulin, an MMORPG from Snail Games, held an online auction ahead of release, selling subscription cards and in-game items whi...

Copyright infringement is alright with Angry Birds

Nov 04 // Brock Janikowski
Taking the stage at TechCrunch's Disrupt conference in Beijing last week, Vesterbacka presented a set of "Angry Birds" balloons to the crowd. I say "Angry Birds" in quotes as opposed to Angry Birds in italics because, as Vesterbacka pointed out, there seemed to be a lot of Angry Birds merchandise for sale in China, the vast majority of which was not licensed by Rovio. Yet Vesterbacka was sanguine on the topic of copyright infringement, stating that it showed a "proven demand" for Angry Birds in China. Instead of starting the arduous task of hunting down every street vendor and game pirate providing Angry Birds games and merchandise in China, Vesterbacka felt the copyright infringement was actually helping to build a market for the for the Angry Birds brand. Vesterbacka believed the rampant copyright infringement was building the popularity of Angry Birds and would eventually lead to Rovio's opening its first stores to capitalize on the demand. The approach is uncommon in a tech company, but Vesterbacka stated, "The way we look at it, of course we want to see the officially licensed, good-quality products, but at the same time, we have to be happy about the fact that the brand is so loved that it is the most copied brand in China." The game has already registered 50 million downloads in China, and Vesterbacka hopes to be at 100 million in the next year. Is it really possible that allowing copyright infringement could be a good thing? I think either intuitively or based on our own experience, we can probably imagine a time when copyright infringement or bending the law in the tech world seemed like a reasonable, even good, option. Have you ever downloaded music from a foreign country that you couldn't otherwise get your hands on? Have you ever imported a game outside of your region despite the fact that it wasn't meant for sale in your area? Sometimes, this sort of illegal activity acts to balance out a market that fails to provide a legal means for getting your hands on certain products. This doesn't make it any less illegal, but when laws get in the way of willing consumers, there might be a problem. Vesterbacka isn't faulting pirates and infringers in China because he understands his company isn't providing Chinese consumers with the products they want. Even in Rovio's absence, the Angry Birds brand can still grow due to the actions of fans and some enterprising "entrepreneurs." Seems like a decent compromise, doesn't it? Vesterbacka's comments fly in the face of the actions of many of our industry's other gaming giants. Whether it is forcing complex DRM measures into games, requiring persistent online connections for even single-player experiences, or region-locking consoles and games to stop people from importing them into other countries, the industry is rife with schemes to control game properties. These issues only amount to a hassle for those of us in tech-centric countries like Japan and the US, but it can be easy to forget that those who live outside of territories where the tech world is established may struggle to get their hands on properties we take for granted.  In countries like Brazil where tariffs on things like videogames are extremely high, videogames may be prohibitively expensive for many to legally obtain. Without videogame companies and publishers making an effort to bolster their presence in such countries to bring down the prices, a little piracy and copyright infringement might be the only real options for those interested in getting into videogames. China is similar -- with a government that heavily controls business practices and is not always welcoming to videogame companies, allowing copyright infringement to fill the gaps and provide people with the products they desire might help companies build mind share with the public, even if they can't be there themselves. I'm certainly not advocating that everyone go out and pirate games if they live outside videogame-inundated territories. If you live in a foreign country and have the means to get your games legally, you should do so. Still, Vesterbacka points out that even though Rovio isn't making money on Angry Birds in China, they are allowing others to help build the future of the brand. Isn't it better for companies to reach those who otherwise might never get to play their games, even if it means people won't be able to pay for them? Companies may be building fans who might be able to pay for those games in the future. Of course, there is always another side. Building a culture in which copyright infringement and piracy is the norm can create a standard of not paying for entertainment. That's not a tenable business model for our artists and creators. Infringement might also lead to others' creating low-quality products that give people a bad impression of a brand. Heck, isn't the iTunes AppStore already letting people do that? Copyright Law is at worst a necessary evil. It protects artists and creators from those who would freely distribute their work without care of the consequences. Yet, maybe Rovio's choice not to go after pirates and infringers makes sense if it means fulfilling a demand the company can't personally meet. If game companies don't allow their brands to flourish in other territories, even if it means piracy and copyright infringement, those territories might not get to experience just how amazing the world of gaming really is. Maybe worse, people in areas like China might start to think Angry Birds is the pinnacle of gaming.
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Most companies go out of their way to protect their intellectual property. The scenarios, stories, and characters found in famous gaming titles are the lifeblood of many companies; allowing others to take their creative works...

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Chinese pirates help Unity expand


Oct 02
// Fraser Brown
I can't imagine ever seeing a general consensus when it comes to software piracy. Consumers, developers, publishers and the media all approach the situation from different angles and have different motivations and investments...
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Fruit Ninja's sticky juice to splatter all over China


Sep 29
// Dale North
Man, there's just something about Fruit Ninja. Even the most jaded, weathered, hard core gamer can still find some time for this casual delight. Everyone loves this chart-topping Halfbrick mobile title! You're a cranky piece ...
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Crytek bringing free-to-play Warface to 'Western markets'


Aug 16
// Jordan Devore
It seemed odd that a company like Crytek would produce a free-to-play first-person shooter for PC and only talk about how it's going to be available in China. The powers that be are now discussing further plans: Warface "will...
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China tells booth babes to show less skin


Jul 30
// Victoria Medina
Booth babes have become one of the attractions that people attending conventions and expos expect to see. They are sexy and usually scantily or outrageously dressed, they may not know anything about video games (or whatever p...






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