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Cave Story

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Cave Story maker releases iOS game about saving(?) seals


Jan 11
// Tony Ponce
Daisuke "Pixel" Amaya, the creator of everyone's favorite freeware-turned-paid-game Cave Story, has just released his first title on the App Store. Azarashi, an updated version of a quickie time-waster he made over a decade a...
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Cave Story+ gets a Holiday Overhaul


Dec 24
// Jonathan Holmes
I love talking about Cave Story, but with so many versions of the game out today, it's hard to know which one to recommend. The new backgrounds, soundtrack remixes, hidden areas, and 3D graphics of the 3DS version make t...
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Check this bubblicious Cave Story custom figurine


Dec 12
// Tony Ponce
Kodykoala, a.k.a. ekoala2002, is back with a non-zombie custom figurine. We have here the robot pair Quote and Curly from Cave Story recreating the iconic scene after the Core battle. Kodykoala has even included an air bubble...
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VikingGuitar makes the Cave Story soundtrack metal


Nov 10
// Conrad Zimmerman
There are a lot of things I adore about Cave Story. The visual presentation, the pixel-perfect platforming, surprisingly effective characters; I could go on and on. The music is the aspect of Cave Story that I've spent t...

Review: Cave Story 3D

Nov 08 // Jonathan Holmes
Cave Story 3D (3DS)Developer: Nicalis/PixelPublisher: NIS AmericaReleased: November 8, 2011 MSRP: $39.99 [For a full review of the Cave Story experience, start here. The remainder of this review will focus on the new and altered content of this 3DS exclusive version of the game.] Cave Story 3D exists almost solely because of its new graphics, so we might as well start there. The game looks really, really different now, to the point where it's almost unrecognizable. The original Cave Story was created by one person (graphics, music, story -- everything), and while it's an incredible piece of art, some parts of the game are stronger than others. It think it's safe to say that Cave Story's backgrounds are probably the aspect of the game that fans are least attached to. They aren't bad by any stretch of the imagination, but it's not hard to imagine that they couldn't be improved upon. With Cave Story 3D, Pixel got his chance to do just that. The settings and background graphics of Cave Story 3D are as close as we'll likely ever get to seeing what Pixel truly intended the world of Cave Story to look like. The differences here can be staggering. The Labriynth has gone from being a nondescript brown cavern with inexplicable floating blocks to an intricately designed network of high-tech elevators, littered with decay and half-destroyed dreams. Where there were once basic platforms, there are now gigantic statues, corroding passageways, and sparkling pools of water.  The result of the full backdrop overhaul reminds me a lot of classic Disney films, where the detailed backgrounds lend a strong sense of place and "reality" to the game's events, while the simple and iconic give us characters that are easy to relate with. Screenshots do not do this game justice. You have to see it in motion running on the 3DS to really understand how nice it looks. The 3D effect does a lot to further drive that improvement home. I didn't turn the 3D off once during my time with Cave Story 3D, and for good reason. The game is still played purely on a 2D plane, but the team at Nicalis put in every effort to make the world feel three-dimensional. Tiny details lie in the background of nearly every stage, and objects in the foreground pop out at you with convincing strength. The camera is really smartly implemented as well, zooming in and out of the action at just the right times to imply a sense of intimacy, grandeur, intimidation, safety, or whatever other feeling may be appropriate for the scene in question. There are some drawbacks to 3D, though. For whatever reason, the game is generally pretty dark, so make sure you turn up the brightness on your 3D to the max. the screen can also get pretty cluttered at times, but thanks to the crystal-clear map on the lower screen, it just takes a quick glance down to figure out exactly what's going on.As for the backgrounds themselves, some of the more organically based areas don't translate to polygons that well. Grass doesn't always look like grass, some trees don't look like trees, etc. This is also true of the game's polygon-based characters. A lot of them look and animate fantastically, such as the protagonist, series co-mascot Balrog, and all of the big bosses. That's part of why it takes you out of the game so much when some of the enemies and a few of the NPCs just don't animate quite right, either with stiffness, or that "gliding" walk animation that has haunted many an animation student in the past. It's barely noticable, but it still stood out to me. If I didn't have the original title and the WiiWare remake to compare them to, there is probably no way I would have even noticed these little issues, but that's Cave Story 3D's dillemma in a nutshell. It's impossible not to compare this remake to the near-perfect versions of the game already available on multiple platforms. Thankfully, Pixel and the team at Nicalis were aware that not all fans may want fully polygon-based characters in their Cave Story. The game has a mode that can be selected at the title screen that allows for it to be played with Pixel's original sprite-based characters in the polygon based-backgrounds. The results are really nice. The sprite-based characters are lit in real time just as the polygon characters would have been, which allows them to blend in seamlessly. As a huge fan of Pixel's original sprites, this is the version of the game I prefer, but it's definitely worth playing both versions to see for yourself.  The graphics aren't the only thing to get an overhaul. The soundtrack has also been remixed, by Dtoid Show award winner Danny B and Dustin Kulwicki. A couple of the remixes will probably come across as too different to some fans of the original arrangements, but the craftsmanship here is inarguably top-notch. The more ominious tunes in particular are much more intimidating and evocative now, which comes as no surprise coming from the guy who did the soundtrack for Super Meat Boy. Beyond the new graphics and sound, there are a lot of little tweaks. The platforming feels a little easier sometimes, there a lot more health pickups to be found, and most importantly to old fans, there are about four new areas to be explored. These new levels are all based on designs from the unreleased beta of Cave Story, but they've now been seemlessly integrated into the main game. Though they are a nice touch, only one of these areas stuck out to me as truly amazing. You'll know it when you play it. It's also the area that's also home to the game's new NiS-flavored surprise.  Sadly, that's all there is for new content. Normally, that wouldn't be a big deal, as Cave Story has plenty of playtime and replay value. The problem here is that Cave Story 3D has to compete with $10 versions of the game that arguably have more content. The recently released Cave Story+ has the new graphics and music from the WiiWare version, an all new unlockable "gaiden" area called the Wind Fortress that features new enemies and bosses, and many of the other features from the Wii original. Most of that new content did not make it to Cave Story 3D. Also M.I.A. is the soundtrack player from the DSiWare version, one of my favorite features from that port. Again, if this were the only version of Cave Story that existed, no one would think to care about these "missing" details. As with nearly every aspect of Cave Story 3D, its main problem is that fans of the original title have been spoiled by Nicalis and Pixel's previous efforts. In the end, Cave Story 3D may be the best version of the game, but it's not necessarily the definitive version. You really need to buy Cave Story+ in addition to this title if you want to experience everything that Cave Story potentially has to offer. At $40, Cave Story 3D is four times more expensive than the other retail version of the game, which will undoubtedly hurt this iteration of the title in the eyes of many consumers. Knowing that a perfectly playable, attractive-looking version of the game is available on the eShop for $10 makes it hard to say that Cave Story 3D offers the best Cave Story bang for your hard-earned buck on the 3DS.  It's still an amazing game, and it's definitely worth your time and cash, but budget-conscious consumers who prefer an 8-bit look may be better served by picking up the DSiWare version for a fraction of the cost. Either way, every 3DS owner should buy Cave Story. It's one of the best games ever made, in 3D or otherwise.
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Cave Story is a modern classic. Sadly, many people still haven't ever played it, even though it's been released on WiiWare, DSiWare, and the iTunes App store. That's probably partly due to its retro look. It's hard to generat...

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NIS: Stores don't want to sell non-AAA 3DS games


Oct 08
// Jim Sterling
Cave Story is coming to 3DS, which is exciting news for fans of the cult smash platform title. However, publisher NIS America isn't exactly jumping for joy. President Haru Akenaga is worried about the game, claiming NIS ...
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Cave Story 3D screenshots, now with 2D


Sep 28
// Fraser Brown
Cave Story 3D was originally meant to come out this summer, otherwise known as the past. It's now scheduled to come out on November 8th in the United States. Perhaps these screenshots will tide you over. Feel free to stick th...
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Cave Story+ finds its way onto the Mac App Store


Sep 08
// Jordan Devore
Cave Story has seen -- and is still seeing -- quite a few releases, but it is one of those games worth playing by all. Beyond this, more content seems to be thrown in with each version, so you won't hear me complaining. The l...
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Cave Story 3D slides back to November


Jun 27
// Jordan Devore
With today's announcement that Cave Story 3D has been pushed back to November 8 in the United States, the holiday season for 3DS owners gets that much busier. Why the delay? "Additional game improvements." "We are currently u...
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Cave Story 3D interview and DS to 3DS comparison video


Jun 13
// Jonathan Holmes
Now that I've actually seen Cave Story 3D in person, I'm totally confident with the game's visuals. The way that objects scroll both in the foreground and the background and the way the camera zooms in and out at strategic m...
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New Cave Story 3DS screens to get excited about


Jun 10
// Chad Concelmo
With E3 officially over, now is the time to get back to being excited over the games that are actually coming out in the near future. One of these games is Cave Story 3D. Releasing for the Nintendo 3DS on August 9th (only two...
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Have a remixed track from Cave Story 3D


May 20
// Tony Ponce
Was today's earlier exclusive nugget not enough for you? Need more Cave Story in your life? Good ol' Danny Baranowsky, who you may remember as the composer of Super Meat Boy, just tweeted a preview track from Cave Story 3D. S...
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Exclusive: Old meets new in Cave Story 3D


May 20
// Jonathan Holmes
Here's an exclusive look at the Cave Story sprites as they'll appear in Cave Story 3D. This optional display of the game was revealed a few days ago, but this is the first time it's been shown to the outside world. Check out ...
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Cave Story 3D features 2D sprites, NIS surprise


May 15
// Jonathan Holmes
So far, it seems fans are fairly split on Cave Story 3D. Some of you are all about buying the game again, for its new 3D display and promise of new areas, enemies, modes, and features. Others are so turned by the game's new v...
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[Update: Just spotted an image of Mimiga Viliiage in polygon form on Nicalis's Twitter and added it to the gallery.] Cave Story 3D is one of my most hotly anticipated titles at the moment. The promise of new content, designed...

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Did you catch yesterday's secret in Cave Story WiiWare?


Apr 30
// Jonathan Holmes
I'm guessing the answer is "no", because I've been scouring the internet all morning for some source or report on this. Sadly, I can't find anything. All I have to go on is an email I got from Tyrone Rodriguez from Nicalis (...
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Cave Story 3DS gets August release in NA, September in EU


Apr 28
// Conrad Zimmerman
Finally, I know when my 3DS is likely to have some value to me as more than the sexy thing that sits in a cradle on my desk. NIS America has announced today that Cave Story 3D will be releasing on Nintendo's new toy in North ...
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Cave Story t-shirt planned for charity to benefit Japan


Mar 17
// Jonathan Holmes
Nicalis, the publisher of Cave Story, Ika-Chan, and La-Mulana, is planning to put a new Cave Story t-shirt on sale with all the proceeds going towards helping Japan recover from the recent Earthquakes/Tsunami and the coincidi...
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The Pixel GDC Experience


Mar 10
// tyrone
[Tyrone Rodriguez, the head of Nicalis (the people responsible for, among other things, the Wiimake of Cave Story and La Mulana), recently shared his GDC experience in our community blogs. Read below for his mostly unedited n...
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Adorable Cave Story 3D teaser and images


Feb 14
// Jordan Devore
There was a mighty response to the reveal for Cave Story 3D, Nicalis' remake for 3DS, in addition to Cave Story creator Pixel teasing a long-awaited sequel. We didn't get our hands on some of the concept imagery until today,...
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Cave Story developer's new game is codenamed 'Rockfish'


Feb 13
// Jonathan Holmes
It's been a long time since Pixel (Daisuke Amaya) has put out a new game. He completed Cave Story in 2004, worked on the WiiWare and DSiWare ports of the game that were released last year, and put out a microgame for Wariowar...
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Destructoid: LA Cave Stories, Guitar Martyr, and Halo 5?!


Feb 12
// Tara Long
Good afternoon, denizens of Destructoid! 'Tis afternoon o'clock on a lovely Saturday afternoon, and that can mean only one thing - last night's episode of your favorite internet online video game show had technical difficult...
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Prinny and Cave Story shenanigans are afoot


Feb 08
// Jonathan Holmes
The image pretty much says it all; Prinny from the Disgaea and Prinny games is wearing the "Curly Brace" hat from Cave Story, and that gun and that scarf look quite Cave Story-styled as well. Other that, we have no idea what'...
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Cave Story creator adds the narrative to NightSky


Jan 04
// Jonathan Holmes
This just in from NightSky's publisher's Twitter -- "Did we already mention Pixel wrote the story to NightSky? Yes, the same Pixel who gave the world Cave Story." This news comes to us right on the cusp of the game's January ...
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New Cave Story info dump and MEDIA BLAST!


Sep 22
// Jonathan Holmes
Here's the some news related to those Cave Story hints I dropped earlier in the week. First off, Cave Story is coming to DSiWare. There will be at least one new feature, maybe more. To quote Tyrone Rodriguez -- "it's really a...

Review: Cave Story (WiiWare)

Mar 29 // Jonathan Holmes
Cave Story (WiiWare) Developer: NicalisPublisher: NicalisReleased: March 22, 2010MSRP: 1200 Wii Points Cave Story starts with no explanations and no promises. You control man in a cave, who, like the player, doesn't know who he is, where he is, or what he's supposed to do. From there, the game's world gradually unfurls before you, revealing a place not quite like anywhere else. Some of the game's narrative points have been seen before. The man vs. nature stuff was recently used in a similar way (but to a lesser effect) by Hollywood darling Avatar. Despite those similarities, the game feels unique. The way it fuses gameplay and storytelling under a unified style of subtlety and surrealism is hard to define. In terms of the kinds of feelings Cave Story evokes, the only things I can compare it to are some Studio Ghibli films like My Neighbor Totoro and Princess Mononoke, but even there, the correlation is far from perfect. You could compare Cave Story to Super Metroid because of the way it utilizes a strong sense of place and non-linear exploration to form a connection between the player and the game. You could also compare it to a classic run-and-shmup like Gunstar Heroes, as -- like that 16-bit classic -- being tasked to simultaneously navigate through a screen full of bullets, while firing off precision shots of your own, while jumping over instant-death-traps, while collecting essential power-ups, becomes commonplace after a few hours of play. That's not quite right, either, as between those action-packed 2D set-pieces, the game can feel more like a SNES-era Final Fantasy game. When you're not busy jumping and shooting, you can reap huge rewards for painstakingly combing the game's world for items, weapons, and narrative events. Talking to everybody twice, searching fireplaces, and finding secret passages is quick to reveal something new and exciting in the world of Cave Story. Actually, doing anything in Cave Story could lead to something new and exciting. "There is a surprise around every corner" may be a tired cliché, but in this instance, it's totally true. These surprises come in many forms. In terms of storyline, the initially cute-and-sweet story frequently dips into surprising, truly dramatic, sometimes disturbing places. Permanent character death isn't uncommon, though its frequency doesn't lessen its power. You'll care about these characters, and when they die, you'll feel it. Boss fights are also particularly evocative. Not all of them are key to the game's story, but even the more random battles can have a way of blowing your mind, particularly when they come as an ambush. There is no place in Cave Story that lacks cuteness or danger, and that juxtaposition works to keep the player constantly unsure of what will happen next. You'll learn early on in the game that even the most peaceful cabin or innocent-looking office can suddenly be invaded by huge, ass-kicking bosses. Many of these bosses will kill you, and they may kill you many, many times. Don't let that intimidate you, though, as Cave Story is a game that stays compelling even when it gets tough. In the same way that the NES-style Mega Man games use friendly, easy-to-look-at graphics and catchy music to keep things fun even in the face of constant restarts, Cave Story uses its charming visuals and infectious soundtrack to keep the player engaged even after hours of regular deaths. The last section of the game is particularly treacherous, filled with powerful, hard-to-hit enemies and instant-kill hazards. It's an area that has already become infamous among fans of the game for being so punishing, yet so fair, and more than anything, so compelling. That's the sort of thing that makes Cave Story a must-play for anyone considering a future in game design. This is the stuff of game design genius, pure and simple. If you understand how Miyamoto designed the first few seconds of Super Mario Bros. to teach you everything you need to know about the game (how to jump, what your enemies are, how to kill them, and how to obtain power-ups) without ever letting the player know that they're learning anything, then you'll know what I mean by "game design genius." That's the sort of thing that's happening in Cave Story all the time. It'll likely take you multiple play-throughs and constant observation to catch all the tricks the game uses to teach you what it wants to teach you, but each time you pick up on one, you'll be smiling. Probably my favorite "meta"-type game design move made by the developer of Cave Story relates to the way its branching path system plays out. I don't want to give too much away, but let's just say that where most games with multiple endings use the standard "if you do this, the game's script jumps to this page, but if you do this, it jumps to a different page," function, Cave Story's multiple story arcs are triggered in a very different way. As opposed to jumping to a certain page, the player can instead arrange it so that particular pages are ripped out entirely, metaphorically speaking. So the game has a lot of high-minded, smarty-pants game design prestige going for it. What if that kind of "depth" doesn't mean anything to you? What if a more concrete, calculable sort of depth is your priority? Well, then Cave Story still has you covered. There are plenty of weapons, enemies, and environments to explore, and it's rare that you'll be fighting the same types of enemies for long. The game isn't afraid to toss a weird new enemy at you once (I'm looking at you, knife-wielding frog) and only once. On the other hand, every weapon you get will remain useful for the full length of the game. On that note, the game will take you quite a while to complete. I clocked about ten hours on my first try, and another ten on my second run for the better ending. Though the first three-quarters of the game did get easier the second time through, playing for the best ending opens up more levels, all of which are much more difficult. For collection-crazed gamers, there are also tons of optional weapons to grab, some of which are goddamn brilliant in design. There are also plenty of non-essential items and other cute details added to the game just for the fun of it. This all adds to a level of replayability rarely found in even full-priced retail games. Speaking of price, just about everything I've described can be experienced in the free version of Cave Story, already available on the PC. So, what does this new WiiWare port do to justify its $12 price tag? Well, for starters, the game now runs at 60 frames per second, so everything is silky smooth from start to finish. The graphics have also received a total overhaul, bringing 480p definition and added character to the already charming sprite work. Even if you were a fan of the way Cave Story was before, chances are high that you'll prefer the game's new look. It retains all the charm of the original, while adding just enough to make everything more evocative and beautiful. It's one of the most loyal yet most improved visual upgrades a game has ever received. The music has also been remixed, in a style that clearly works to retain the chiptune charm of the original, while adding variation to the virtual orchestra. The sound waves here are fuller, and liberties are occasionally taken with the specifics of the orchestration. Mega Man-style vibrato makes its way into the proceedings now and again, which I greatly appreciated. It's worth noting, though, that I never completed Cave Story on the PC, so much of the music here is totally new to me. Longtime fans of the game have noted that the new remixes don't sound right to them. That's okay, though, because like the new graphics, the new music can be switched on and off at any time in the options menu. What can't be altered is the game's English script, which has seen some major changes from a fan translation released a few years back. Though this new script retains the same meaning as the old one, the details have often changed. The game has always had a few cultural references (a character name Cthulu, for instance), but now there are even more of that brand of semi-humor. My guess is that the version you've read first will be the one you prefer, as whatever words you associate with your first time through Cave Story will be the words you'll be most attached to. Either way, both translations are great, so to have one available for free on PC and one available in the WiiWare version can only work to increase the amount of ways in which the game can be enjoyed. Then there are the bonus modes created specifically for the WiiWare build of the game. There are now three difficulty levels -- easy, normal, and hard -- each with their own version of the game's main character. On easy, enemies seem to die more easily and the player takes less damage, and on hard, you get no health power-ups or missiles, making the game feel like a limited power-up run on Metroid: Zero Mission. I'd recommend Normal for most players, as it has plenty of challenge, but not so much that things feel intolerable. Either way, you'll see the same story, so you won't lose or gain much in terms of what you see and do. In fact, none of the game's new modes greatly alter the core game. Curly Brace mode allows you to play as an NPC who plays an important part in the regular game. Playing as Curly changes almost nothing, though. You'll see some new dialogue, and of course, she looks different from the regular protagonist, but beyond that, it's all the same. There is also Boss Rush mode and Sanctuary Time Attack mode. The first pits you against all the game's bosses in succession, and the latter forces you to play through the game's toughest dungeon while being timed. Both modes are cool, but it bugs me that they are accessible from the start. It would be extremely easy for someone who hasn't already played through Cave Story to jump into these modes before they've beaten the game, and in doing so, spoil themselves from some of the cooler bosses and levels as they appear in the "real" game. That design flaw is one of my only complaints about Cave Story. The only other thing that I might change about this port relates to the new graphics. They may be much nicer than the old sprites, but at a higher resolution, the limited animations used for most of the game's characters look slightly less fluid than before. It's a always been a problem with animating detailed sprites: the less pixelated they become, the more frames of animation you need in order to make them move smoothly. It's a bummer that along with the new, higher-res sprites, Nicalis couldn't have added a few new frames of animation as well. Still, it's an extremely small complaint, one that I'm guessing 99% of the population couldn't give a rat's ass about. All in all, Cave Story is an incredible game that I'm sure I will be playing again and again for the rest of my life. It succeeds at telling a great story, providing fantastic run-and-gun gameplay, and a huge world to explore, and it does so with a style and technique all its own. For a new 2D action/exploration game to come along now, more than twenty years after the genre's creation, and still be this fresh, is an achievement in and of itself. As someone who had the PC version of the game for years, but never finished it, due in part to a preference towards the console experience, Cave Story on WiiWare is a godsend. The new modes, graphics, and sound, plus the ability to play with a NES-style controller on an HDTV, makes the experience feel totally deluxe. If the original Cave Story was a like VHS rough-cut bootleg, this WiiWare port is the special edition DVD -- an indispensable purchase for any fans of the genre. As a free piece of software, the original Cave Story gets a perfect ten. This not-free, enhanced port gets a... Score: 9.5 - Superb (9s are a hallmark of excellence. There may be flaws, but they are negligible and won't cause massive damage to what is a supreme title.)
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Some people love it, and other people loathe it, but almost everyone agrees: Cave Story is an important game. Does that sound dumb to you? Well, it probably should. The word "important" as it relates to videogames has been...

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Why Cave Story is the greatest videogame ever


Mar 27
// Ashley Davis
Everyone has a game or series of games that they love above all others. A while back, a few of my fellow editors wrote articles proclaiming their favorites. I love talking about the games I love, so this was an idea I wanted ...
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Cave Story becomes a number one seller on WiiWare


Mar 25
// Jim Sterling
Who says good games can't sell on the Wii? Nicalis has just confirmed that Cave Story is doing very well following its WiiWare launch this past Monday. So well, in fact, that it has climbed to number one in the online store's...

Cave Story creator talks inspirations, sequel, and more

Mar 22 // Nick Chester
Tyrone Rodriguez, Nicalis: Please introduce yourself. Daisuke "Pixel" Amaya, Studio Pixel: I am Pixel, the creator of Cave Story. Why did you call it Cave Story? Did you have other names in mind? Cave Story was a temporary name I used during development. The name Cave Story kind of stuck and we started to feel that this simple and not overly dramatic title was perfect. Is Metroid a big or small inspiration for Cave Story? I believe it was a very strong inspiration. There were several games as well as things (outside of games) that were a strong inspiration for Cave Story. Among those the one of the biggest would be Metroid. More than anything else, I love Metroid (especially the SNES Super Metroid). Please tell us more about the unreleased version of Cave Story. At first I was thinking of a game that required careful bullet/ammunition management; take down enemies then use the collected money to obtain more ammunition. It was that type of game. But then, we wanted to create a flow where you would start out using the bullets sparingly and as you proceed in the game the amount of ammunition would become unlimited. At one point, we prototyped the unlimited bullets and it felt so good that I believed my idea was a success--but on the contrary, I felt stress from the restrictions of the limited ammunition in some areas. How much of this beta version is complete? This may be a bit of a spoiler, but I had completed the game up to the the final showdown where Puu (final name Balrog). By this point the player will have fought against many times in the story. In this final form he's a giant, but most of the puzzles spread around in each stage hadn't been completed. I felt it was very shallow. Being incomplete, it also had a lot of bugs. Are there any elements from this version that you wanted to include in the WiiWare version? When creating the WiiWare version, we had no thoughts about the previous version. I'm not good at integrating previous elements. To the uninitiated, the PC versions of Cave Story run at 50 frames per second (fps). The Wii version runs at 60fps. Can you explain why the PC game is 50 frames per second (fps)? Was Cave Story designed for, 60 fps or 50 fps? No matter what environment (PC), if it runs well on 60fps, then I will always choose 60fps, without a doubt. However, at that time, there were lots of PC setups that weren’t 60 fps. There were environments that could set the refresh rate through the program, but there were other environments where you couldn't. Most PC's were at a refresh rate slightly higher than 60fps. When that happens, with a one to two second cycle, the periodical scroll of the screen shook erratically and this affected the game experience--which I didn’t like. In the end, I made it 50 fps because there were no environments at 50 fps. Regardless what environment it's run on there would be no adverse issues. It's very important that the movement or motion is consistent no matter what the environment. At first I had contemplated that it was a refresh rate problem. The environment is restricted, but when I saw how smoothly the game scrolled on 60 fps I thought there couldn't be any other choice than 60 fps. There were several other people on the Internet who've had similar thoughts, but then I saw points like it’s more important to make a fun game than to fixate on the refresh rate. I remember at that time feeling like I finally reached a solution. Early on in the game a character inside Egg Tell us about "Master's Eggs." Some players are under the impression that Igor is referring to the evil doctor. I don't usually any character settings that are confirmed or set in stone during development.... In the Egg Corridor, one of the flying dragon eggs hatches. There was a professor who managed and examined the eggs inside the Egg Corridor. This doctor was not THE doctor nor Professor Booster. (And of course not even Dr. Gero) This person does not appear in the game, but performed tests alone. Before dying from old age, this professor met a lost Mimiga (Igor). Igor loved and respected the professor and continued the work. At a later time, though, Igor ate a red flower. Players see the result pretty early on in the game. One of the main antagonists, Misery seems to have an issue with her hair in the PC versions. Sometimes it appears green and sometimes blue. Why is her hair originally green and blue? Which is it? In Cave Story, there are several characters with dark green hair that appear. To be honest, I wanted to make their hair black, but it would have blended into the background too much. Because of my lack of skill I couldn't omit any colors other than black, so from those problems their hair color was decided. The hair color of the Misery could be blue or green. Black hair will look like the color changed depending on the background it’s against. Please tell us a little bit about the Miakido and other statues in a specific area. Those are statues of the reigning Lords of Cave Story that the sculptor created.What was your most favorite part for making the WiiWare version of Cave Story? I really like that the music and art was remade. In the original game it was my preference to show the art and music poorly because it was an aspect that couldn't be undertaken effectively due to limited time and manpower. For the Wii version, the music was recreated by a professional musician. Going back to the original Cave Story, by the time it was completed I had listened to the background music enough times to hate it, so it's fun to play it with new music. The new art was drawn with more details. At first, I was a little uneasy thinking that it was very important to maintain a consistent look, but I was relieved after it was complete, seeing the background and characters move. I was playing the PC version in 320x240 mode. I'm still not used to playing the game in 640x480. Anyway, it's wonderful that it came out on a game console that families can play. I had endless abandonment problems for choosing the PC as the platform. One of them being the vast of setups. As I mentioned earlier, depending on the environment, the functionality and control changes... I made it so that it can be played on the keyboard, but as far as I know there are several things that are difficult to use on the PC game controller. Cave Story has the Nintendo Wii Remote (which I love) and Classic Controller to use on the and it functions the same no matter who plays. If you were to design Cave Story now, what would you do differently? First of all, I would make a completely different main character. I don't know about the rest. But, there might be a lot of pressure caused by comparisons with its predecessor. What is the most popular question or request from fans? That there be a sequel or continuation of some kind. It makes me happy to know people want it.What will convince you to create Another Cave Story? There is an order of priorities for me, that's: Family > Myself > Work > HobbiesCurrently, being married and raising a family, there aren’t many resources I can put in to my hobbies, but with that little resource I am slowly making an RPG. Even that barely moves forward, so it may be impossible to create a Cave Story that surpasses its predecessor. I've been told many times that the work in creating a game is difficult. Many individuals lose their spare time and end up having to work hard through late nights. If they are creating a game they like, then I am quite envious. However, it would be a problem for those with families that do not have time to spend with them. How does it feel to be able to play your game on a game console? Of course, it's wonderful to have people play it on the Wii. For me, it's like a dream come true. I think I will tell my family and friends. My wife is still half-believing and half not-believing. And if you had been told it would someday come out on a console? I’d have been happy, but wouldn’t have believed it. Do you have any suggestions for those people who want to learn how to program and design their own games? I believe that ideas for a game design should not be polished until it's actually running. What I do is play while creating, feel and think about what would make me like this game more. The problem with this method is that you can’t effectively create planning documents. If you had an unlimited budget and a team that would work for you, what kind of game would you create? I have a habit of thinking what can be done within the limitations, so nothing comes to mind if you give me an unlimited budget. I think it would be very appealing to create my own world on a network and have other players communicate to each other through that. Do you think your lifestyle would change now? I don't know. But, I'm looking forward to my wife becoming more interested in my game creations.
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It's a good day for fans of action/platformers -- an updated version of the indie freeware classic Cave Story finally hits WiiWare today. With updated visuals, new modes, and familiar Cave Story gameplay, it was a "must have"...

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Cave Story dev blasts God of War III as 'fluff'


Mar 22
// Jim Sterling
Cave Story developer Tyrone Rodriguez is something of a hero to Wii fans since he brings the anticipated Cave Story to WiiWare today. However, as beloved as he may be, he might lose fans from the Sony crowd (if Cave Stor...

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