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Brutal Legend

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Jack Black dresses like Eddie Riggs for the VMAs


Sep 14
// Brad Nicholson
The 2009 Video Music Awards didn’t kick off without a bit of videogame-related goodness. Actor, comedian, singer, and c--k push-up master Jack Black made a red carpet appearance at the place of the event donning the gar...
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Brutal Legend makes censorship fun


Sep 07
// Jim Sterling
Filters have been around in videogames ever since you could toggle the blood in old fighting games. It's amazing, then, that it's taken this long for a videogame to make a filter that's actually part of the game and quite amu...
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More comedic talent added to Brutal Legend cast


Sep 01
// Nick Chester
While Jack Black may be taking center stage as roadie Eddie Riggs in Brutal Legend, he's not above sharing the spotlight with some of his comedian pals. GamePro has revealed that Kyle Gass, Brian Posehn, and Steve Agee w...
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Brutal Legend ESRB description is long, totally epic


Aug 30
// Nick Chester
There was little doubt that Double Fine's Brutal Legend was going to get slapped with an "M" rating by the ESRB. This is a game based off of heavy metal culture -- sex, drugs, rock n' roll... an Iron Maide...
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Play with Schafer, unlock Brutal Legend achievement/trophy


Aug 27
// Nick Chester
The Achievement/Trophy list for Double Fine's Brutal Legend hit our inbox today, and they're pretty much what you'd expect. Plenty of nods and references to heavy metal music, and general rocking the hell out.  Of n...
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Destructoid cordially invites all readers to our second Twitter Party Extravaganza, and you don't even have to bring beer. At 3pm Central (RIGHT NOW) to 5pm Central, Twitter will be set aflame by talk of THE METAL and all thi...

Interview: Picking the brain of Double Fine's Tim Schafer

Aug 20 // Ben Perlee
DESTRUCTOID: Now, this event is the multiplayer event, which you said was the first part of the game that had been developed and worked on. Can you describe how the multiplayer came about with Brütal Legend?Tim Schafer, President and CEO of Double Fine Productions: I always imagined it as a multiplayer game right from the beginning, which is that it's all about being a kind of leader of a rocker army, and Eddie is this guy who, in the single-player campaign, builds an army. You get to see the creation story for each element of the army, the headbangers, the razor girls, the thunderhogs, and each unit he adds to his army. In multiplayer, you have them all at your disposal. And the idea is that you are building this stage, and, in Brütal Legend, we kinda equate rock shows with wars, and bands with armies. So you are building a band, you are building an army. So you build these headbangers, you recruit them to your army; they come stage diving off the stage. You go out there, you find these fan geysers -- which are naturally occurring fans bubbling out of the ground -- and you win them over to your army by playing an awesome guitar solo in the game, and then you build them a merch booth, because fans need merchandise. And they stay loyal to your army and they fly back to your stage and that's basically the only resource you have to worry about. They fly back to your stage automatically, and they help you put on bigger and bigger shows. You can make either a bigger stage or you can recruit more warriors to your troops, so that's kind of a strategic decision you make when you play the game. So that's the flow of the game. Capture resource points, get fans, build warriors, send them out on the battle field, capture more resource points, eventually get a big enough army that you can just attack your enemy's stage and burn it down.Tonight we are playing just 1v1, but I know that this goes as high as 4v4. Describe that experience.That's a cooperative experience with your friends. You get on team chat, and you hopefully agree amongst yourselves that “Okay, I'll take care of maybe the resource building, you take care of harassing enemy troops.” Or maybe you all do everything at the same time. It's really up to the players to decide how to split up the duties. You can play the game that way, just as an action game, just you and your ax, doing the combos, you can do your rockslide and you can do your rock kick and you can do pyrotechnics and play as an ax-wielding brawler. Or you can play more strategically. You can change the weather by playing the right solo at the right time, which changes the tide of battle. Or flying around over the battlefield, you get this bird's-eye view of your troops or your enemy's troops. You can scout out and see, “Oh, they're building a lot of infantry,” and if you're an advanced player, you'll think, “I've got my metalbeast, which is really strong against infantry, so I'll build some more of them,” and there's these counters in the game. Really, it's for all levels of play, where if you are into the action, you can be in that, or if you want to go deeper, you can go deeper.I've noticed there's only three different character factions. Could we see any more factions down the line with downloadable content?I can't say...but sure, I think right now, the three are so different and they provide such a different  experience that there's a lot of things to explore with it. For instance, there's the Ironheade, Eddie Riggs' army, and it's Ironheade with an extra “e” on the end, 'cause they are extra metal, and they are more of what you'd think of a classic rock, kinda something you'd see on an album cover, just like rocker girls and the headbangers and guys on choppers and stuff. They have a lot of fire attacks, and they're really fast. Then you have the Drowning Doom, which is more of a black metal. They listen to black metal, they look undead, they're really creepy, they have a guy who barfs rats, and their specialty is playing debuffs and buffs. They can play really depressing music with an organ. They are willing to use keyboards, which sets them apart from Ironheade. They depress everyone on the battlefield with their music and that makes them fight better and makes their enemies fight worse. And then the Tainted Coil is the demonic army, and they are run by Doviculus, who is voiced by Tim Curry. They are all about the hierarchy, so they have Battle Nuns and War Fathers, and Over Blessers who are like this structured, organized army. They all have their own minions, and you can talk to a Battle Nun, wherever she is on the battlefield, and she can spawn minions right there. If you are at an enemy base, you can spawn a bunch of minions, so it's a very powerful technique. But they are more complicated, so there's strengths and weaknesses with each faction. I think there's a lot of stuff for people to be exploring for a long time in our multiplayer.So the multiplayer looks like it's going to be a strong component of Brütal Legend. It's getting close to the completion of the game, and it has gone through some hurdles that most games don't go through. What is it like for you knowing that this game is almost done?It's exciting. I mean, you work on a game for a long time, it kind of becomes your life, it feels like your job is not games, but Brütal Legend. I'm so excited for people other than us to actually be able to see the game. We've been looking at it, we've been playing it, and we think it's really fun, in the office, right? But you never know. We're like, “Oh, I can't wait to show it to people,” and showing it tonight, to anybody, is really terrifying. The fact that people are still hanging around, playing it, and having fun is a good sign.So now that we are entering this exit phase of sending Brütal Legend out to the presses, when are we going to learn about the next Double Fine's next product? Can you offer some hints?[laughs] It might be a while before we can talk about that. I mean, it could be a lot of different things. There are a lot of stories in the Brütal Legend universe I'd like to tell. There are also new ideas I'd like to do. You're just going to have to wait for that, but there's a lot of stuff with Brütal Legend still to come that we'll be talking about.Very cool, it sounds like good things are to come. Within the last month, some very cool releases and re-releases have come out. The Monkey Island franchise, which you helped create, has all of a sudden become a really big deal. What's your response to this game being remade and reborn and having a whole new generation play it? It's really interesting. I mean, it's great. I have a lot of warm feelings about Monkey Island; when I hear the music, I get instantly happy, and I remember it being 1990, back when you were three years old. I was sharing an office with Steve Purcell and Peter Chan and Dave Grossman, and Ron Gilbert was down the hall, and we were making this game together. I was much younger, and it was before you could go online and read a bunch of nasty forum comments. [laughs] It was you and a bunch of friends making a game to entertain yourselves. It was really a fun time. When I play the game, especially when I play it in the classic mode, all those kind of feelings come back to me. It's really a fun experience for me to play. It will be interesting to see how people react to it. Things change, and people want different experiences. Part of the thing with games in the past is that they are either better than you remembered, or they are worse. I hope people remember Monkey as even better than they remembered, because maybe they were so young when they played it the first time, they didn't get half the jokes. You always try to write it like a Warner Bros. cartoon, where there is a juvenile version of the joke, and where there's a more sophisticated version for people who want that, so hopefully people who played it as kids will play it as adults and get a deeper level of understanding. That's what I hope. I hope it's not like Catch-22, where you read that in college, and it blows your mind. Then you read it as an adult, and you're like, “I think this was better when I read it in college.” [laughs]So were you involved in any way, shape or form with the re-released Monkey Island?I only heard about it through rumors. I mean, Ron and Dave knew about it, but they are really tight-lipped professional dudes [laughs], so they wouldn't tell me anything, but I could tell something was going on, because a lot of people were rumbling about it.Do you think you'll ever go back to a point-and-click at all?The way I work is, I just have an idea, and do it. So if I ever had an idea for a point-and-click game, I would do it. I play a lot of console games, and they kind of inspire me. I would say playing Super Mario 64 is what made me change from thinking about PC games to thinking about making a console game. That's where Psychonauts came from. It started this long process that eventually became Psychonauts. Playing Ocarina of Time and Mario 64 made me realize there was different ways to explore a world. There's a much more accessible way to run through it, instead of just clicking on it. There's nothing wrong with clicking on it; it's a different experience. We had a lot of fun making The Host Master and Conquest of Humor, which is a silly little Flash game that our web guy Clint made, and you're playing that and you're like, “Well, it's kinda fun to make this kind of game.” Basically, I'm optimistic about the future, because it seems now the industry can support games of all sizes, so we can make a small adventure game. They don't have to be five-year projects. Double Fine itself is maturing to the point where it can hopefully make a big game and a little game at the same time.I actually have some questions from community members on our site, and one of our community members, Naim Master, asked if you had ever thought about making a 2D-style game, or a quick and easier downloadable title for Xbox Live Arcade or PlayStation Network? Could that be something in the future of Double Fine?Definitely. I feel I am open to making whatever idea comes into my head, and I feel very fortunate and lucky to be able to say that, cause everyone would like to be able to say that. Hopefully, through this team we've built up through Double Fine, there's a lot of talented people there, we're able to do more than one thing at one time. And we do little 2D games, like Tasha's Game [a side-scrolling platformer on the Double Fine site]. I don't know if you've played that, but it comes off like a web game based on a comic. Clint had made it all by himself with some art from Tasha, and music from Raz, and Bird, but if you play it, it actually has a really fun mechanic. Basically, we are doing it; that's all I'm saying.You mentioned the creative process, and we have some community members, DaedHead8 and Krow, who really wanted to know: You are known for making very unique, very special, very...not necessarily outlandish, but very different types of games and types of characters and tropes and images, especially with Psychonauts, and with Brütal Legend...What's a trope?A trope? [laughs] Uh, it's like an overarching theme within a work.Nice.Sorry, I'm an English major, it's terrible.Wow, man, you tropes. What a bunch of tropes.[laughs] But I want to ask you, what do you do to get creative? How do you get your creative juices flowing? First, I like to eat a bunch of tropes. That really inspires me.[laughs]I always believe there's like a goose in your head, and the goose either lays golden eggs, or it doesn't. When you live off creative ideas, it's kinda scary, because at the beginning of every day, it's like a blank page. You won't get paid, and you won't pay your mortgage if you don't have an idea. Which is kind of terrifying if you think about it. Everybody is capable of being really creative; it's just a matter of not being afraid to follow up on those ideas. I learned that while working on Monkey Island with Ron [Gilbert]. I think the only reason we wrote funny dialogue is that we thought it was temporary dialogue. We were just joking around. I was like, “Look behind you, a three-headed monkey!” I assumed Ron would tell me the real line and we would replace it. When Ron came up to our office -- it was shared with programmers, and he laughed at the line -- and I was like, “I don't really know what to say there” and he was like, “That's it! We're gonna say that line!” I was like, “You can't be serious. A three-headed monkey? There's no such thing as a three-headed monkey, Ron. Don't you ever watch the Discovery Channel?” [laughs] In fact, maybe it was Dave or Ron, but one of them said, “We should actually make art of a three-headed monkey to come out behind you.” And I was like “No, you guys! That's too ridiculous!” And then we did it, and it was one of my favorite things about the game. That's when I learned that there's this internal sensor you have in your brain that kills your own creative ideas because you are afraid other people will laugh at you. And you are afraid someone will come by and say to you, “That's WRONG!” So you censor yourself. And there's a lot of that stuff in Psychonauts, the censors that go around with ideas, these self-censors who destroy your own ideas. Also there's that big fat critic in Gloria's level who is like the idea of having an internal critic that's too large, that is too critical, that keeps you from doing the things you need to do. It's a psychological thing that people have to deal with. Doing that experience with Monkey Island is what taught me that, “No, actually, you're right. The stupid ideas that you have are often the best you have,” and who cares what anyone else thinks about them? Everyone else is wrong, and those people are really stupid, so who cares what they think? So take those dumb ideas and run with them. There are no consequences for putting that stuff out there. That's what I would encourage people to do, run with their stupid ideas more.It's really a testament that you are running with those ideas, because it was your name that was chanted on cable television for, like, five minutes by one of the most popular comedians in the nation, Jack Black, going “Tim F**kin Schafer!” What was that like for you?That was unreal. I mean [both laugh], 'cause on those shows, you don't have developers at all; they have an actor come out and pretend to be the guy from Grand Theft Auto accept an award. They won't be an actual developer. I think in some ways it came from Jack, because Jack was one of the creative forces behind those awards, and he's a real gamer. You know, he played Mass Effect twice. That's a scary thing working on this game, is I'm working with his voice. I know he's gonna play it, and he's going to find every line of dialogue, and there's, like, 30,000 lines of dialogue. So I have to make sure he's going to like it. Anyway, he's a real gamer, and he knows what he's talking about when he talks games, and I think that was his choice to elevate a gamer to that level. It was kind of a joke, but it was also kind of great, in a way, for all developers. We'll never be as glamorous as the Oscars. I don't think any award show for games will ever be as glamorous. I think the most glamorous we'll get is the Director's Guild Award, because game developers -- until we have a Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie in our games -- are craftsmen. So it was really a lucky thing that I got to be on TV.  And, it's a tribute to Jack, but with our generation, a lot more people are game-savvy these days. It used to be voice talent. They would come in, they would work on the game, they didn't know what they were saying. Nowadays, people know what they are talking about, games are more prevalent, and it's a different age.Well, thank you so much, Tim Schafer, this has been a incredible interview, and I really appreciate you being so candid.Was I too candid?No, no! [laughs]Did I say anything I'm going to regret?Well, would you like to say anything las--Would you like to say anything you'll regret? [laughs]Well, sure! Would you like to? [both laugh] What would, like, people, when they sit down to Brütal Legend, come Rocktober, if you could sum up in three, or five, or ten words -- what is the feeling you would like people to have?I want people who love heavy metal to actually feel like someone who loves heavy metal made a game just for them. But I also want people who hate heavy metal to be drawn in by the humor or action of the game, then come out of it liking heavy metal just a little bit more. It's something that's true [to me], and I really do love it. And I hope it really does expose people to a lot of great bands they haven't heard about before.Awesome. Well, thank you very much.Thank you!
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Tim Schafer. Tim f**king Schafer. He's a man that most of us know. One of the writers behind The Secret of Monkey Island, and the man behind Full Throttle, Grim Fandango, Psychonauts, and Brütal Legend, Schafer has remai...

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A few weeks ago, Destructoid co-hosted a Twitter party for King of Fighters XII, using everybody's favorite self-obsession network to hand out a bunch of cool prizes to the Destructoid community. The power of the Destructoid ...

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Pre-order Brutal Legend for early access to the demo


Aug 18
// Jordan Devore
Why wait until September 17 to play Brütal Legend when you can do so a little in advance? As we guessed earlier, one of the pre-order bonuses for the rocktacular game will indeed be a chance to get the demo early -- rese...
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GC 09: Get this Brutal Legend trailer into your skull


Aug 18
// Jim Sterling
Electronic Arts kicked off Gamescom with a presser full of hype and marketing, like any good presser should. Among the festivities was a bit of a boast about Brütal Legend defeating the "huge ugly monster" that...
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Brutal Legend demo coming in Septic-tember (Update 2)


Aug 18
// Nick Chester
If you're not already sold on Double Fine's Brütal Legend, your brain might be broken. But we can understand wanting to try before you buy, so we're happy to hear a demo is on its way for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 this ...
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Tim Schafer on creativity: 'Stupid ideas are often the best'


Aug 14
// Ben Perlee
One of the things I did with my interview with Tim Schafer was allow some community members to offer questions to ask the guy. I liked what DaedHead8 and Krow asked: How is Tim able to be so creative, and how does he get thos...
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Tim Schafer on Monkey Island: 'I get instantly happy'


Aug 13
// Ben Perlee
By now you've heard about the multiplayer for Brütal Legend, as well as the yet-unseen 4v4 mode. But, as we all know, Tim Schafer is a man of many hats, and one of the hats he wore was writer for the original The Secret ...

Preview: Brutal Legend (multiplayer)

Aug 13 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
Brütal Legend (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)Developer: Double FinePublisher: Electronic ArtsTo be released: October 13, 2009Now, the learning curve was really steep only because I haven’t played the single-player. You have to spend some time playing the single-player mode in order to learn the ins and outs of the game. In a way, you can look at the main game as a giant tutorial for the multiplayer. So don’t go jumping online when you pick it up at launch, unless you like the idea of failing hard. The multiplayer is best described as a brawler with light real-time strategy elements. You’ll be building up an army to send into battle, but you can also fight right alongside your troops. The one and only multiplayer mode in Brütal Legend has players commanding troops in order to destroy each other’s bases, or in the case of Brütal Legend, each other’s wicked, awesome rock stages. There are three forces players can select from: Ironheade, The Tainted Coil and The Drowning Doom. Ironheade is controlled by main man Eddie Riggs, The Tainted Coil is controlled by main baddie Lord Doviculus, and The Drowning Doom is made up of a force that I’d rather not describe ... it’s actually a giant spoiler for the game. (I’m still pissed that I figured out what the spoiler was at the EA event.) Anyway, whereas the first two forces are more heavy metal-inspired, The Drowning Doom has a heavy, Gothic look. You’ll always be in control of one of the three main characters as you give out orders to your troops. The d-pad is used to give out orders such as "follow," "defend," "charge" and "move to the beacon." You’ll also be able to team up with every single unit you summon for a team attack. Just go up to a unit and press Y, and you’ll partner up. In the case of Eddie Riggs, there’s a female rocker that will sit on Eddie’s shoulders and shoot out guitar beams of rocking awesomeness (not the actual name for the attack). Lord Doviculus can ride a giant walking tower that can stomp on enemies. As for the main warrior for The Tainted Coil, she can pick up these giant decapitated heads, throw them at enemies, and permanently take control of an enemy unit. We only got to play on one of the seven maps the entire night, which was a giant U-shaped valley. At the peak of each side of the valley is the rock stage, where players will summon their troops from. In order to summon troops, you need fan power, which is the multiplayer’s currency system. At both rock stages are two giant Merch Booths that are constructed over Fan Geysers, which spit out fan energy. At the start of the round, you’ll have some fan power already built up, so you can summon your forces that spawn from your stage. Once you’ve built up a sizable force, it’s best to rush to the center of the valley in order to take over the lone unclaimed Fan Geyser. This Geyser has a giant slug-like creature over it that will prevent you from building a Merch Booth until it’s killed. Your hero can’t directly attack the slug or enemy Merch Booths, so you have to wait for your troops to destroy it before you can work your magic. In the meantime, you can take to the air and watch over your troops or go scout out what your opponent is planning. You can’t do anything like attack or play your guitar while flying, but you can’t be harmed, either. You can attack other players and their troops while on the ground with either your melee or special guitar attacks, but you need to be smart in the battles you pick. If you die during battle, you will be resurrected back at your stage, but you will lose 50 Fan points. Once the Fan Geyser is clear, it’s time to set up your own Merch Booth. To do so, you’ll pull up your guitar menu and play the Merch Booth song. If you successfully hit the buttons to match the on-screen prompts in time, your Merch Booth will be built and you’ll have a new source of income. Each of the three armies has about ten or so special guitar solos that they can perform. The special attacks include rallying your troops to your location, turning your teammates invisible, summoning a car for yourself, and summoning wild animals to aid you. Each side also has one ultimate solo, which is your hero’s most metal attack. In the case of Lord Doviculus, a giant uncontrollable Iron Maiden creature (not Eddie, unfortunately) falls onto the battlefield and rampages on anything that isn’t Tainted Coil.  More Fan power flow means you’ll have some extra currency to upgrade your stage. You can upgrade the stage up to three levels, allowing you to get newer and better troops with each upgrade. The max unit count is 40, and each minion has a different build cost to them. The bigger and better the unit is, the higher the build cost will be. Players can also take to the stage and use it to fight back against enemies. You’ll do little performances in order to knock back enemies, unleash a cloud that slows down enemy attacks,  and repair your stage. There are also stage lights at the top of your stage, which you can use to shoot laser beams at enemies. You can summon new units wherever you are on the map, but most of the units spawn at the stage and will stay nearby unless you’ve set up a rally point. You also have to be pretty close to your units in order for them to hear your commands. The Tainted Coil has a few units that can actually build units anywhere on the map, though. They literally give birth on the map, and you’ll never, ever forget the horrible sounds these creatures make when it happens. After a couple of matches, I finally got the hang of things, and was kind of surprised at how much fun I ended up having with the multiplayer. I’m not a big fan of games where I have to babysit anything, but unit management is really simple and doesn’t seem get annoying here. Even better is that up to eight players can compete in the multiplayer, in four-on-four matches. The players can delegate what they want to do in the match, and thankfully, you can choose to only have people on your friends list on your team. The main thing that I feel is hurting the multiplayer is the lack of modes and teams. One mode and three teams is way too small. Something tells me that we can expect some DLC down the line.
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Brütal Legend has a ton going for it. The single-player experience is impressive, the soundtrack is going to rock so hard, and the game is still scheduled to rock October now that Activision backed off Electronic Art&rsq...

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Schafer rocks Rubik's Cube for Brutal Legend soundtrack reveal


Aug 10
// Nick Chester
Okay, so maybe the soundtrack for Brütal Legend leaked a bit early. But for its official reveal, Double Fine and Electronic Arts rock it hard... by having designer Tim Schafer solve a Rubik's Cube. Huh? Sure. Why no...
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EA Denmark lets Brutal Legend soundtrack slip (Update)


Aug 09
// Matthew Razak
I don't know if the soundtrack for a game has every truly been "hotly anticipated," but if one had to choose the most "hotly anticipated" soundtrack to a game ever it might just be Brütal Legend's as ...
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Activision getting barely anything in Brutal Legend suit


Aug 07
// Jim Sterling
If you like to see evil publisher Activision getting what it deserves for its greed and hubris, then this is the story for you. The LA Times is reporting that the nefarious company is getting "little to not compensation&...
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Rocktober lives! Brutal Legend lawsuit settled


Aug 06
// Jordan Devore
It's been a bumpy road for Brutal Legend, what with all the legal mumbo jumbo surrounding the game. It started as Activision suing Double Fine for allegedly "improperly" transferring the rights from Activision to El...
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Jack Black usurps Internet meme throne in Brutal Thoughts #5


Jul 23
// Samit Sarkar
Look, I like Jack Black. I’m a big fan of his band, Tenacious D, and I think he’s reasonably funny in general. Unfortunately, most of the “Brutal Thoughts” videos that he’s done (see parts two, t...
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Double Fine files countersuit in Brutal Legend legal battle


Jul 22
// Nick Chester
According to a report by the Washington Post, Brütal Legend’s developer Double Fine has filed a countersuit to Activision’s legal attempts to prevent the game’s Roktober release. The countersuit contend...
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Start your morning off right, watch some more Brutal Legend


Jul 21
// Conrad Zimmerman
Do you have 22 minutes to spare? In that case, may I recommend viewing this fine gameplay video for Brütal Legend? Like the video from last week, it features commentary from Tim Schafer. And, deciding that he alone is in...
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Limited edition Brutal Legend figure is simply gorgeous


Jul 20
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Holy f**k! Look at this thing! LOOK AT IT! This Brütal Legend figure rocks! The Eddie Riggs figure was sculpted by Mark Newman, painted by Tom Vukmanic and is over 17 inches tall. It features Eddie getting ready to kill...
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EA's San Diego Comic-Con lineup is full of violence


Jul 17
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Electronic Arts has over a dozen games they want the San Diego Comic-Con masses to get their hands on. Here’s everything that EA will be showing off on the Comic-Con showfloor: Brutal Legend Dante’s Inferno Dead ...
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Brutal Legend multiplayer features four-on-four 'skirmish'


Jul 17
// Jim Sterling
Electronic Arts has today revealed details about multiplayer for upcoming rock n' roll action game Brütal Legend. Billed as a "four versus four skirmish," action will blend with strategy to create something tha...
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Jack Black explains the history of the battleaxe


Jul 09
// Conrad Zimmerman
Man, there's really been a ton of content coming out on Brütal Legend as they ramp up hype some three months before the scheduled release of the game. And, hey, here's more of it!In this short video, Jack Black does that...
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GWAR and more rock Comic-Con's Brutal Legend Metal Meltdown


Jul 08
// Nick Chester
Now here's something that makes me wish I were headed out to San Diego for Comic-Con this year...Electronic Arts a Vice are hosting the Brütal Legend Metal Meltdown Concert on July 23 in San Diego, just in time for Comic...
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17 minutes of Brutal Legend with Tim Schafer


Jul 03
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
We at Destructoid cannot get enough of Brütal Legend. Everything about this game is going to be so awesome! A new video for the game was released and it shows off the first 17 minutes of the game. All of this was covere...
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Rumor about a rumor: Wii version of Brutal Legend canceled


Jun 30
// Nick Chester
This October, Double Fine's Brütal Legend will rock the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 so hard that the name of said month has been changed to "Rocktober." And while it's not been confirmed by the developer or its ...
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Jack Black tries to make funny in latest Brutal Legend promo


Jun 25
// Nick Chester
This latest "Brutal Thoughts with Jack Black" promotional video for Brütal Legend isn't quite as funny as some of the previous ones. We blame it on the suspicious lack of Tim Schafer. Well, at least Schafer get...
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Brutal Legend box art ushers in impending Rocktober arrival


Jun 23
// Nick Chester
We don't do "check out this box art" posts that often, but we make our exceptions. Double Fine's Brütal Legend is one of those exceptions. So, you know, "check out this box art."Of note is designer Ti...

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