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Brutal Legend

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Jack Black talks Brutal Legend on Jimmy Kimmel Show


Oct 15
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
For the past couple of weeks, Jack Black has been going around dressed up as Eddie Riggs from Brutal Legend promoting the game at various venues. His latest appearance as the roadie hero took him on The Jimmy Kimmel Show last...

Review: Brutal Legend

Oct 13 // Nick Chester
Brütal Legend (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: Double FinePublisher: Electronic ArtsReleased: Rocktober 13, 2009MSRP: $59.99If you're a fan of videogames and heavy metal culture, Double Fine's Brütal Legend should be the greatest game that has ever been made. Hatched from the creative and (sometimes) twisted minds of Tim Schafer and company -- one of the gaming industry's most lauded designers -- Brütal Legend is truly the over-the-top world of heavy metal brought to life. It's an homage that pays respect to the genre -- its music, imagery, and artists -- while at the same time having a laugh at some of its most ludicrous tenets. In that respect, the world as brought to life in Brütal Legend is brilliant, and sometimes awe-inspiring.Schafer has gone on record as saying the goal with Brütal Legend was to take every scene, every single still image you could possibly get from the title, and use it as the cover for a heavy metal album. From an art standpoint, Brütal Legend delivers on that promise, offering a land littered with skulls, architecture that looks strapped in bondage, and skies seemingly painted in the blood of demons. The world as a whole looks like a watercolor work, like an absurd Boris Vallejo painting brought to life, with Double Fine interpreting the words and imagery of heavy metal music to influence its aethestic. For those familiar with metal culture, the world will feel both unexpectedly alien and immediately recognizable; for those not in the know, the game will be like a subliminal heavy metal master class.As expected, this extends to the game's writing, which is, unsurprisingly, Brütal Legend's biggest strength. The game follows modern-day roadie Eddie Riggs as he gets sent "back in time" to a world where heavy metal (or at least the spirit of it) ruled the land. Tasked with using his roadie skills of organization to lead an uprising of metalheads to overthrow the oppressive Doviculus, Eddie ends up becoming a key player in a war that's been brewing for centuries. Brütal Legend has enough snappy dialogue and plot twists to keep it captivating from beginning to end, with a cast of characters that are surprisingly well thought out, despite being based on well-known cliches.Fans of Jack Black might be disappointed to hear that his delivery as the voice of Riggs isn't typical of the actor's over-the-top rock-n'-roll comedy persona. His more restrained performance is good for the game, however, and Riggs comes across not only as tolerable, but likeable. Performances by the rest of the cast, including everyone from Tim Curry to Lita Ford, are mostly solid across the board. Hell, Ozzy Osbourne even managed to deliver understandable dialogue as an in-game merchant. The connection to the story and the characters does suffer due to a few of the game's technical hiccups. For instance, in-game dialogue is sometimes delivered with the wrong timing -- an environmental cue will trigger a conversation too early or too late, for example -- which can be a bit jarring and confusing. Even some of the game's odd editing, including sloppy transitions from in-game action to cut-scenes, can interrupt the flow of the narrative. Simply put, the impressive efforts in writing simply don't translate as well as they could have with a bit more polish.As far as the gameplay is concerned, Brütal Legend is a mish-mash of gaming styles and genres. While it's an interesting approach to design, the problem here is that not a single one of these elements is as satisfying or as fleshed-out as it should be. If you've played the demo, you're already familiar with the game's third-person action mechanics. Eddie can swing his big heavy metal axe to dismember, slice, or decapitate his foes. Alternately, he can use a guitar for attacks, including playing a button-pressing mini-game to perform one of the most amazing attacks you'll see in any game -- the "Face Melter." Aptly named, the attack will literally melt the faces of your enemies. Yes, it's as awesome as it sounds.But for all of that, the third-person combat can also be repetitive and sloppy. With the block button mapped to the out-of-the-way "B" button, we rarely used it; instead we'd quickly hit "B" plus the analog stick while locked on an enemy to dodge attacks. Holding down the "B" button to block left us without a good way to attack, and therefore we mostly ignored it.As far as the lock-on is concerned, it's not exactly the most intelligent setup. Combat can sometimes get hectic, with Eddie and his army (more on that in a bit) taking on huge groups of baddies at once. Attempts to lock on to an enemy directly ahead of you, but a bit off in the distance, sometimes will cause you to lock on to a closer enemy to your left or right... one that's already engaged in combat. All the while, of course, that enemy off in the distance is repeatedly pounding you with some kind of ranged attack. It's fortunate that in big battles such as these, there's little reason to target enemies -- simple button mashing generally does the trick. While you can upgrade your abilities as you progress through the game, that button mashing feeling never truly goes away.Brütal Legend isn't necessarily all about its one-versus-all combat, though. It's also an open-world game that Eddie can navigate in the Deuce, a heavy metal hot rod nicknamed the "Druid Plow." The Deuce can be summoned nearly anywhere in the world and at any time by simply playing a heavy metal riff, and you'll be doing this often, as the game's story objectives and side missions are scattered all over the game's world. Here's where the problem comes in -- navigating the world is a bit of a bitch. While you can can access a map by pressing select, the game's clean "we don't need no damned HUD" design means there's no constant mini-map on your screen. While it's great that developers are looking for ways to immerse players in the game experience, doing that at the expense of having to pause the game to see a map every 30 seconds is unacceptable. Yes, you can set a beacon/waypoint on the map, which you can then follow to your destination, the turn signal of Eddie's car helping with general navigation. Regardless, there are times when you simply won't be able to see the beacon (if it's not in your line of sight, for instance), or the turn signals are giving seemingly odd direction advice... so it's back to the map screen, slowing down the action.As for what you'll be doing in this open world, it's a mixture of missions that will advance the story and side quests that can earn you credits for various upgrades for Eddie and his metal army. The game's side missions are generally very basic, and nothing we haven't seen before in open-world games -- things like fending off an enemy attack or point-to-point races, for instance. As for the story missions, while some of them are basic "kill the enemy" or escort missions, it's only a few hours into the game that Brütal Legend reveals its hand and makes a surprise turn as a real-time strategy game.You read that right: a huge part of Brütal Legend -- including most of the missions that will let you advance in the story, and those that serve as boss battles -- is a real-time strategy element that mixes the basic concepts of standard RTS games with squad-based console control mechanics from titles like Rainbow Six. It's unfortunate that this is such a significant portion of Brütal Legend's core gameplay, because quite frankly, it's the most tedious, least fun, and most broken part of the game. These instanced RTS battles generally have two factions battling for fan geysers to build "mech booths" on, which then provide you with resources to spend on units that you'll use to destroy your opponent's rock stage (or in at least one instance, the door to a fortress) or protect your own.While it's clever of Double Fine to incorporate such a disparate and unexpected style of gameplay into Brütal Legend, it simply doesn't work on so many levels, and it kills the overall experience. Imagine, if you will, playing a real-time strategy game with no mini-map to keep track of troops; instead you're given the ability to oversee only part of the battlefield by flying up and hovering above the action. The only way to order your troops is by way of clunky point-and-click beacons, and stop/go/attack commands that (if you're lucky) your troops will only listen to half of the time. Frustrating doesn't begin to describe these experiences, forced throughout Brütal Legend.Some of the battles can go on for upwards of one hour, with you fighting off hordes of enemies with your own troops, the back-and-forth struggle more repetitive and boring than fun. With zero checkpoints in the battles, it's possible to fail (or in many cases, you might simply turn off the console in frustration) 30 or 40 minutes in, and then get sent back to the start to do it all again. Simply put, these RTS sections are a miserable addition to a game that features otherwise inoffensive (if not somewhat obvious) gameplay. Being forced to participate in a number of these battles, including most of the major boss battles, was simply painful. With each RTS battle presented, we would groan, wishing at the most that Double Fine would have been able to refine this console RTS experience to make it more playable, and at the least, enjoyable. (Full disclosure: Towards the end of the game's story, we were forced to switch to the game's easiest mode, "Gentle," just so we could complete a particularly frustrating battle to "get it over with.")As it turns out, these RTS sections are simply a tutorial for the game's online multiplayer, which mirrors these instanced sections in just about every way. The multiplayer mode does offer a bit more variety in that it lets you choose from three of the game's factions: Ironheade, Drowning Doom, and Tainted Coil. Each has its own look and unit types, as well as its own leader, which is directly controlled by the player. However, when it comes down to it, each is balanced evenly in terms of strenghts and weaknesses. The online mode also offers four-on-four battles. Having three other teammates admittedly makes it a bit easier to manage troops than in the single-player, and it opens the game up to eke out a bit of fun. But considering the multiplayer is built around what is easily the one gameplay style that ultimately destroys the single-player experience, it's hard to imagine this mode will have legs in the long run.Again, Brütal Legend should be one of the greatest video games ever made; the key word here is "should." It's with a heavy heart that, after almost 15 hours of play (including multiplayer and single-player side quests), we have to report that it simply doesn't deliver the way we wanted it to. For fans of metal, there are enough inside jokes and nods here to make you smile, and even casual observers of the culture will find something to hold their attention. But ultimately, the game disappoints, with some "been there, done that" gameplay mixed with some potentially interesting concepts that either fall flat, or sometimes feel like a chore.Is Brütal Legend brutal? Definitely. Is it metal? The world, its inhabitants, and the 100-plus metal tracks that nearly tear out your speakers as you play are proof enough of that. But unfortunately, those things didn't quite add up to an amazing game, instead leaving us with a title that could have been so much more. Score: 6 -- Alright (6s may be slightly above average or simply inoffensive. Fans of the genre should enjoy them a bit, but a fair few will be left unfulfilled.)
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Despite having only developed one game prior, there were a lot of expectations for Double Fine Productions' follow-up, Brütal Legend. With founder Tim Schafer behind the wheel, this heavy metal world translated to videog...

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Brutal Legend is out today, we've got stuff to give away


Oct 13
// Jim Sterling
Electronic Arts has not sent me a copy of Brütal Legend, but would still like me to help promote their game for them. Not sure how that works but Hell, I've already agreed and we've got two sweet limited edition 17"...
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Rock Band DLC: Brutal Legend pack, Satriani, and more


Oct 09
// Nick Chester
If you were wondering what you'd be doing until the Queen 10-pack for Rock Band dropped in two weeks, here's your answer -- rocking the f*ck out.  Next week brings the "Brutal Legend Pack," which features ...

Tim Schafer talks Brutal Legend on Late Night

Oct 04 // Matthew Razak
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I don't watch Late Night at all, so far be it from me to pass judgment on the quality of the show, but if this is how Fallon runs all his interviews it has to be the most awkward show in the world. When Tim Schafer is on your...

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Brutal Legend video explains multiplayer, talks rock


Oct 02
// Brad Nicholson
Raucous rock music does more than annoy parents in Brutal Legend. Harnessing the power of metal is as vital to the game’s lifeblood as an oxygen tank is to a scuba diver’s lungs. That is to say, without rock n&rsq...
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 Did you know that Jack Black is a roadie for the band Freedom Wizard? They're gonna' be huge.  Okay, so the parts about Black being a roadie and there being a band called Freedom Wizard aren't true. But here's what...

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Watch the Brutal Legend Dem-o-thon live now!


Oct 01
// Nick Chester
The Brutal Legend Demo-o-thon is on now! Well, if it's 12pm PST (3pm EST) you can click the jump and watch it live. So wait, what's going on? Double Fine's streaming a live Brütal Legend video "Demo-o-Thon"...
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Brutal Legend action figure is totally metal


Oct 01
// Brad Nicholson
We don’t know designer Eddie Booze, but we’re guessing he has a thing for Brutal Legend. And who doesn’t at this point? Brutal Legend appears to be a solid action title with a bunch of style and a sprinkle o...
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Brutal Legend themed Soapbox car wins Red Bull Derby


Sep 28
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Not too long ago, Dtoider TheBigFeel made a couple of Community Blogs showing off what he and his friends had planned for the Red Bull Soapbox Race that took place over the weekend in Los Angeles. TheBigFeel and friends desig...
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Ormagoden demands 666 mil Brutal Legend demo downloads...


Sep 25
// Jordan Devore
... or we all get swine flu. When Ormagoden demands something, everyone has to listen. With a name like that, he means business.Thankfully, Double Fine will be doing its part to lessen the possibility of widespread torment. O...
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Demos for Brutal Legend, Forza 3 now available


Sep 24
// Jordan Devore
If, like me, you've become lost in the insane wave of Tokyo Game Show news, let's take a moment to relax and remember that two sweet demos are now downloadable from Xbox LIVE Marketplace.First, there's the Brutal Legend demo,...
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Brutal Legend: Black talks roadies in latest video


Sep 18
// Brad Nicholson
In the latest “Brutal Thoughts” -- a video series featuring Jack Blacks’ Brutal Legend-related musings -- Black teaches the viewer how God built heavy metal roadies just a little bit different than the avera...
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Guess what? A demo for Double Fine's Brutal Legend is available today on Xbox LIVE Marketplace and PlayStation Network. That's the good news. But the bad news is for those who didn't pre-order the game. See, only customers wh...

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Six-minute Brutal Legend intro is, well, totally brutal


Sep 16
// Nick Chester
Alright, we get it already -- Brütal Legend is coming out and we just have to play it. Sure, the intro to the game -- six minutes' worth, just sent to us by Electronic Arts today -- makes us want it even more. But we're ...
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Check out these badass Brutal Legend record sleeves


Sep 15
// Jim Sterling
Word on the street is that if you preorder Brütal Legend from Best Buy, you can get your dirty hands on this ridiculously awesome record sleeve. Most of you children will be too young to remember the good old days, when...
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Jack Black dresses like Eddie Riggs for the VMAs


Sep 14
// Brad Nicholson
The 2009 Video Music Awards didn’t kick off without a bit of videogame-related goodness. Actor, comedian, singer, and c--k push-up master Jack Black made a red carpet appearance at the place of the event donning the gar...
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Brutal Legend makes censorship fun


Sep 07
// Jim Sterling
Filters have been around in videogames ever since you could toggle the blood in old fighting games. It's amazing, then, that it's taken this long for a videogame to make a filter that's actually part of the game and quite amu...
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More comedic talent added to Brutal Legend cast


Sep 01
// Nick Chester
While Jack Black may be taking center stage as roadie Eddie Riggs in Brutal Legend, he's not above sharing the spotlight with some of his comedian pals. GamePro has revealed that Kyle Gass, Brian Posehn, and Steve Agee w...
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Brutal Legend ESRB description is long, totally epic


Aug 30
// Nick Chester
There was little doubt that Double Fine's Brutal Legend was going to get slapped with an "M" rating by the ESRB. This is a game based off of heavy metal culture -- sex, drugs, rock n' roll... an Iron Maide...
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Play with Schafer, unlock Brutal Legend achievement/trophy


Aug 27
// Nick Chester
The Achievement/Trophy list for Double Fine's Brutal Legend hit our inbox today, and they're pretty much what you'd expect. Plenty of nods and references to heavy metal music, and general rocking the hell out.  Of n...
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Destructoid cordially invites all readers to our second Twitter Party Extravaganza, and you don't even have to bring beer. At 3pm Central (RIGHT NOW) to 5pm Central, Twitter will be set aflame by talk of THE METAL and all thi...

Interview: Picking the brain of Double Fine's Tim Schafer

Aug 20 // Ben Perlee
DESTRUCTOID: Now, this event is the multiplayer event, which you said was the first part of the game that had been developed and worked on. Can you describe how the multiplayer came about with Brütal Legend?Tim Schafer, President and CEO of Double Fine Productions: I always imagined it as a multiplayer game right from the beginning, which is that it's all about being a kind of leader of a rocker army, and Eddie is this guy who, in the single-player campaign, builds an army. You get to see the creation story for each element of the army, the headbangers, the razor girls, the thunderhogs, and each unit he adds to his army. In multiplayer, you have them all at your disposal. And the idea is that you are building this stage, and, in Brütal Legend, we kinda equate rock shows with wars, and bands with armies. So you are building a band, you are building an army. So you build these headbangers, you recruit them to your army; they come stage diving off the stage. You go out there, you find these fan geysers -- which are naturally occurring fans bubbling out of the ground -- and you win them over to your army by playing an awesome guitar solo in the game, and then you build them a merch booth, because fans need merchandise. And they stay loyal to your army and they fly back to your stage and that's basically the only resource you have to worry about. They fly back to your stage automatically, and they help you put on bigger and bigger shows. You can make either a bigger stage or you can recruit more warriors to your troops, so that's kind of a strategic decision you make when you play the game. So that's the flow of the game. Capture resource points, get fans, build warriors, send them out on the battle field, capture more resource points, eventually get a big enough army that you can just attack your enemy's stage and burn it down.Tonight we are playing just 1v1, but I know that this goes as high as 4v4. Describe that experience.That's a cooperative experience with your friends. You get on team chat, and you hopefully agree amongst yourselves that “Okay, I'll take care of maybe the resource building, you take care of harassing enemy troops.” Or maybe you all do everything at the same time. It's really up to the players to decide how to split up the duties. You can play the game that way, just as an action game, just you and your ax, doing the combos, you can do your rockslide and you can do your rock kick and you can do pyrotechnics and play as an ax-wielding brawler. Or you can play more strategically. You can change the weather by playing the right solo at the right time, which changes the tide of battle. Or flying around over the battlefield, you get this bird's-eye view of your troops or your enemy's troops. You can scout out and see, “Oh, they're building a lot of infantry,” and if you're an advanced player, you'll think, “I've got my metalbeast, which is really strong against infantry, so I'll build some more of them,” and there's these counters in the game. Really, it's for all levels of play, where if you are into the action, you can be in that, or if you want to go deeper, you can go deeper.I've noticed there's only three different character factions. Could we see any more factions down the line with downloadable content?I can't say...but sure, I think right now, the three are so different and they provide such a different  experience that there's a lot of things to explore with it. For instance, there's the Ironheade, Eddie Riggs' army, and it's Ironheade with an extra “e” on the end, 'cause they are extra metal, and they are more of what you'd think of a classic rock, kinda something you'd see on an album cover, just like rocker girls and the headbangers and guys on choppers and stuff. They have a lot of fire attacks, and they're really fast. Then you have the Drowning Doom, which is more of a black metal. They listen to black metal, they look undead, they're really creepy, they have a guy who barfs rats, and their specialty is playing debuffs and buffs. They can play really depressing music with an organ. They are willing to use keyboards, which sets them apart from Ironheade. They depress everyone on the battlefield with their music and that makes them fight better and makes their enemies fight worse. And then the Tainted Coil is the demonic army, and they are run by Doviculus, who is voiced by Tim Curry. They are all about the hierarchy, so they have Battle Nuns and War Fathers, and Over Blessers who are like this structured, organized army. They all have their own minions, and you can talk to a Battle Nun, wherever she is on the battlefield, and she can spawn minions right there. If you are at an enemy base, you can spawn a bunch of minions, so it's a very powerful technique. But they are more complicated, so there's strengths and weaknesses with each faction. I think there's a lot of stuff for people to be exploring for a long time in our multiplayer.So the multiplayer looks like it's going to be a strong component of Brütal Legend. It's getting close to the completion of the game, and it has gone through some hurdles that most games don't go through. What is it like for you knowing that this game is almost done?It's exciting. I mean, you work on a game for a long time, it kind of becomes your life, it feels like your job is not games, but Brütal Legend. I'm so excited for people other than us to actually be able to see the game. We've been looking at it, we've been playing it, and we think it's really fun, in the office, right? But you never know. We're like, “Oh, I can't wait to show it to people,” and showing it tonight, to anybody, is really terrifying. The fact that people are still hanging around, playing it, and having fun is a good sign.So now that we are entering this exit phase of sending Brütal Legend out to the presses, when are we going to learn about the next Double Fine's next product? Can you offer some hints?[laughs] It might be a while before we can talk about that. I mean, it could be a lot of different things. There are a lot of stories in the Brütal Legend universe I'd like to tell. There are also new ideas I'd like to do. You're just going to have to wait for that, but there's a lot of stuff with Brütal Legend still to come that we'll be talking about.Very cool, it sounds like good things are to come. Within the last month, some very cool releases and re-releases have come out. The Monkey Island franchise, which you helped create, has all of a sudden become a really big deal. What's your response to this game being remade and reborn and having a whole new generation play it? It's really interesting. I mean, it's great. I have a lot of warm feelings about Monkey Island; when I hear the music, I get instantly happy, and I remember it being 1990, back when you were three years old. I was sharing an office with Steve Purcell and Peter Chan and Dave Grossman, and Ron Gilbert was down the hall, and we were making this game together. I was much younger, and it was before you could go online and read a bunch of nasty forum comments. [laughs] It was you and a bunch of friends making a game to entertain yourselves. It was really a fun time. When I play the game, especially when I play it in the classic mode, all those kind of feelings come back to me. It's really a fun experience for me to play. It will be interesting to see how people react to it. Things change, and people want different experiences. Part of the thing with games in the past is that they are either better than you remembered, or they are worse. I hope people remember Monkey as even better than they remembered, because maybe they were so young when they played it the first time, they didn't get half the jokes. You always try to write it like a Warner Bros. cartoon, where there is a juvenile version of the joke, and where there's a more sophisticated version for people who want that, so hopefully people who played it as kids will play it as adults and get a deeper level of understanding. That's what I hope. I hope it's not like Catch-22, where you read that in college, and it blows your mind. Then you read it as an adult, and you're like, “I think this was better when I read it in college.” [laughs]So were you involved in any way, shape or form with the re-released Monkey Island?I only heard about it through rumors. I mean, Ron and Dave knew about it, but they are really tight-lipped professional dudes [laughs], so they wouldn't tell me anything, but I could tell something was going on, because a lot of people were rumbling about it.Do you think you'll ever go back to a point-and-click at all?The way I work is, I just have an idea, and do it. So if I ever had an idea for a point-and-click game, I would do it. I play a lot of console games, and they kind of inspire me. I would say playing Super Mario 64 is what made me change from thinking about PC games to thinking about making a console game. That's where Psychonauts came from. It started this long process that eventually became Psychonauts. Playing Ocarina of Time and Mario 64 made me realize there was different ways to explore a world. There's a much more accessible way to run through it, instead of just clicking on it. There's nothing wrong with clicking on it; it's a different experience. We had a lot of fun making The Host Master and Conquest of Humor, which is a silly little Flash game that our web guy Clint made, and you're playing that and you're like, “Well, it's kinda fun to make this kind of game.” Basically, I'm optimistic about the future, because it seems now the industry can support games of all sizes, so we can make a small adventure game. They don't have to be five-year projects. Double Fine itself is maturing to the point where it can hopefully make a big game and a little game at the same time.I actually have some questions from community members on our site, and one of our community members, Naim Master, asked if you had ever thought about making a 2D-style game, or a quick and easier downloadable title for Xbox Live Arcade or PlayStation Network? Could that be something in the future of Double Fine?Definitely. I feel I am open to making whatever idea comes into my head, and I feel very fortunate and lucky to be able to say that, cause everyone would like to be able to say that. Hopefully, through this team we've built up through Double Fine, there's a lot of talented people there, we're able to do more than one thing at one time. And we do little 2D games, like Tasha's Game [a side-scrolling platformer on the Double Fine site]. I don't know if you've played that, but it comes off like a web game based on a comic. Clint had made it all by himself with some art from Tasha, and music from Raz, and Bird, but if you play it, it actually has a really fun mechanic. Basically, we are doing it; that's all I'm saying.You mentioned the creative process, and we have some community members, DaedHead8 and Krow, who really wanted to know: You are known for making very unique, very special, very...not necessarily outlandish, but very different types of games and types of characters and tropes and images, especially with Psychonauts, and with Brütal Legend...What's a trope?A trope? [laughs] Uh, it's like an overarching theme within a work.Nice.Sorry, I'm an English major, it's terrible.Wow, man, you tropes. What a bunch of tropes.[laughs] But I want to ask you, what do you do to get creative? How do you get your creative juices flowing? First, I like to eat a bunch of tropes. That really inspires me.[laughs]I always believe there's like a goose in your head, and the goose either lays golden eggs, or it doesn't. When you live off creative ideas, it's kinda scary, because at the beginning of every day, it's like a blank page. You won't get paid, and you won't pay your mortgage if you don't have an idea. Which is kind of terrifying if you think about it. Everybody is capable of being really creative; it's just a matter of not being afraid to follow up on those ideas. I learned that while working on Monkey Island with Ron [Gilbert]. I think the only reason we wrote funny dialogue is that we thought it was temporary dialogue. We were just joking around. I was like, “Look behind you, a three-headed monkey!” I assumed Ron would tell me the real line and we would replace it. When Ron came up to our office -- it was shared with programmers, and he laughed at the line -- and I was like, “I don't really know what to say there” and he was like, “That's it! We're gonna say that line!” I was like, “You can't be serious. A three-headed monkey? There's no such thing as a three-headed monkey, Ron. Don't you ever watch the Discovery Channel?” [laughs] In fact, maybe it was Dave or Ron, but one of them said, “We should actually make art of a three-headed monkey to come out behind you.” And I was like “No, you guys! That's too ridiculous!” And then we did it, and it was one of my favorite things about the game. That's when I learned that there's this internal sensor you have in your brain that kills your own creative ideas because you are afraid other people will laugh at you. And you are afraid someone will come by and say to you, “That's WRONG!” So you censor yourself. And there's a lot of that stuff in Psychonauts, the censors that go around with ideas, these self-censors who destroy your own ideas. Also there's that big fat critic in Gloria's level who is like the idea of having an internal critic that's too large, that is too critical, that keeps you from doing the things you need to do. It's a psychological thing that people have to deal with. Doing that experience with Monkey Island is what taught me that, “No, actually, you're right. The stupid ideas that you have are often the best you have,” and who cares what anyone else thinks about them? Everyone else is wrong, and those people are really stupid, so who cares what they think? So take those dumb ideas and run with them. There are no consequences for putting that stuff out there. That's what I would encourage people to do, run with their stupid ideas more.It's really a testament that you are running with those ideas, because it was your name that was chanted on cable television for, like, five minutes by one of the most popular comedians in the nation, Jack Black, going “Tim F**kin Schafer!” What was that like for you?That was unreal. I mean [both laugh], 'cause on those shows, you don't have developers at all; they have an actor come out and pretend to be the guy from Grand Theft Auto accept an award. They won't be an actual developer. I think in some ways it came from Jack, because Jack was one of the creative forces behind those awards, and he's a real gamer. You know, he played Mass Effect twice. That's a scary thing working on this game, is I'm working with his voice. I know he's gonna play it, and he's going to find every line of dialogue, and there's, like, 30,000 lines of dialogue. So I have to make sure he's going to like it. Anyway, he's a real gamer, and he knows what he's talking about when he talks games, and I think that was his choice to elevate a gamer to that level. It was kind of a joke, but it was also kind of great, in a way, for all developers. We'll never be as glamorous as the Oscars. I don't think any award show for games will ever be as glamorous. I think the most glamorous we'll get is the Director's Guild Award, because game developers -- until we have a Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie in our games -- are craftsmen. So it was really a lucky thing that I got to be on TV.  And, it's a tribute to Jack, but with our generation, a lot more people are game-savvy these days. It used to be voice talent. They would come in, they would work on the game, they didn't know what they were saying. Nowadays, people know what they are talking about, games are more prevalent, and it's a different age.Well, thank you so much, Tim Schafer, this has been a incredible interview, and I really appreciate you being so candid.Was I too candid?No, no! [laughs]Did I say anything I'm going to regret?Well, would you like to say anything las--Would you like to say anything you'll regret? [laughs]Well, sure! Would you like to? [both laugh] What would, like, people, when they sit down to Brütal Legend, come Rocktober, if you could sum up in three, or five, or ten words -- what is the feeling you would like people to have?I want people who love heavy metal to actually feel like someone who loves heavy metal made a game just for them. But I also want people who hate heavy metal to be drawn in by the humor or action of the game, then come out of it liking heavy metal just a little bit more. It's something that's true [to me], and I really do love it. And I hope it really does expose people to a lot of great bands they haven't heard about before.Awesome. Well, thank you very much.Thank you!
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Tim Schafer. Tim f**king Schafer. He's a man that most of us know. One of the writers behind The Secret of Monkey Island, and the man behind Full Throttle, Grim Fandango, Psychonauts, and Brütal Legend, Schafer has remai...

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A few weeks ago, Destructoid co-hosted a Twitter party for King of Fighters XII, using everybody's favorite self-obsession network to hand out a bunch of cool prizes to the Destructoid community. The power of the Destructoid ...

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Pre-order Brutal Legend for early access to the demo


Aug 18
// Jordan Devore
Why wait until September 17 to play Brütal Legend when you can do so a little in advance? As we guessed earlier, one of the pre-order bonuses for the rocktacular game will indeed be a chance to get the demo early -- rese...
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GC 09: Get this Brutal Legend trailer into your skull


Aug 18
// Jim Sterling
Electronic Arts kicked off Gamescom with a presser full of hype and marketing, like any good presser should. Among the festivities was a bit of a boast about Brütal Legend defeating the "huge ugly monster" that...
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Brutal Legend demo coming in Septic-tember (Update 2)


Aug 18
// Nick Chester
If you're not already sold on Double Fine's Brütal Legend, your brain might be broken. But we can understand wanting to try before you buy, so we're happy to hear a demo is on its way for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 this ...
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Tim Schafer on creativity: 'Stupid ideas are often the best'


Aug 14
// Ben Perlee
One of the things I did with my interview with Tim Schafer was allow some community members to offer questions to ask the guy. I liked what DaedHead8 and Krow asked: How is Tim able to be so creative, and how does he get thos...
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Tim Schafer on Monkey Island: 'I get instantly happy'


Aug 13
// Ben Perlee
By now you've heard about the multiplayer for Brütal Legend, as well as the yet-unseen 4v4 mode. But, as we all know, Tim Schafer is a man of many hats, and one of the hats he wore was writer for the original The Secret ...






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