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Halo: Fleet Battles photo
Halo: Fleet Battles

Tabletop wargame Halo: Fleet Battles available now


The Fall of Reach
Jul 20
// Darren Nakamura
Man, look at those dice. There's some explosions, there's a "no" symbol, and there's the iconic Halo skull. I don't know exactly how Halo: Fleet Battles plays, but I do love me some custom dice. Halo: Fleet Battles is based o...
Capcom photo
Capcom

Wild speculation commence: Capcom hires new Mega Man producer


Likely just for merchandise
Jun 04
// Chris Carter
According to the folks over at the Mega Man Board Game Kickstarter, Capcom now has a new producer for the Mega Man franchise. This bit of information came to light casually when talking about approved designs, a process that ...
Crysis: Analogue Edition photo
Crysis: Analogue Edition

Haha sure: Crysis board game on Kickstarter


Tactical battles and chest-high walls
May 14
// Darren Nakamura
Crysis Analogue Edition - The Board Game. Huh. Okay. I have been pleasantly surprised in the past with video game shooters turned into tactical board games, but I'm still a bit skeptical about this one. I mean, Crysis's bigg...
Orcs Must Die! board game photo
Orcs Must Die! board game

Orcs Must Die! takes tower defense to the tabletop arena


Even plastic figurines of Orcs Must Die!
Apr 13
// Darren Nakamura
Orcs Must Die! has truly made it. After a few entries in the main series, the scrappy little tower defense from Robot Entertainment now has a board game in the works, designed by Petersen Games. Orc Must Die! The Boardgame c...
Humble Weekly Bundle photo
Humble Weekly Bundle

This Humble Weekly Bundle is all about board games


Trade some money for some sheep
Apr 09
// Darren Nakamura
We don't often highlight the Humble Weekly Bundle these days (more like Humble Weekly Burnedout, right?), but I couldn't let this one go unnoticed. Just in time for International Tabletop Day, this week it's all about videoga...
Mega Man Board game photo
Mega Man Board game

It looks like the Mega Man board game is nearly done


Final approvals from Capcom
Feb 23
// Chris Carter
It sure looks like a lot of work to create a licensed board game. After its announcement and Kickstarter campaign in July of 2013, the creators of the Mega Man Board Game are nearly finished, barring some final approvals from...

Review: Risk

Feb 18 // Robert Summa
Risk (PlayStation 4 [reviewed], Xbox One)Developer: Zoë ModePublisher: UbisoftReleased: February 4, 2015MSRP: $14.99 But let's get to the meat of what we're working with here. What you're getting with Risk is the board game translated directly for a modern audience using the classic 2010 rules. The mechanics and gameplay are generally the same with the main difference being the interface with which you're playing. There are some non-traditional touches, like a helpful AI companion called Iris. And the game offers animations for battle sequences, but nothing that is AAA worthy or will set it apart from its cardboard counterpart. Actually, you'll find yourself skipping these battle scenes just to get to the end result. Thankfully, there is an auto-attack button to advance all that stuff. [embed]287846:57393:0[/embed] I found myself watching these animations at first, but because the matches are so long, they quickly lose their novelty. It's the same when it's the AI's turn. You'll watch at first, but soon find yourself hitting the fast AI option and skipping as much as possible. It's still not fast enough in a lot of cases, but it's better than nothing. If you really want to speed things up, then you'll want to choose the "capture capitals" option when setting up your game. Otherwise, expect to play for at least an hour against two other opponents in the default setting; of course, it could be more or less depending on the amount of enemies you face. As far as difficulty, I never touched the actual play style of the AI, choosing to keep them balanced. However, you do have the options to make them more aggressive or defensive. Risk is really meant to be played amongst friends and enemies -- whether that be online or locally with up to four players. This is why the game exists. If you're only playing the AI, then you're literally only playing half of the game. At its core, Risk is about just that, risk. And the charm of the game comes when you reach those moments of domination, only to be out-lucked at the worst possible times. Risk is cruel. Even downright heartless at times. If you go in expecting to always win, you'll come to realize how foolish an idea that actually was. There were times when I was completely dominating. I had more troops, more territory, the momentum was on my side. Then, all of a sudden, the AI would decide to hand in cards, receive massive amounts of troops, and sweep through my lands like a cool spring breeze. At one moment you are king of the world, master of your domain and the next, nothing. You are worthless. Alone and about to be obliterated. For better or worse, this is what Risk is. In its simplicity is its utter cruelty. If you're looking for a deep strategy game in an effort to plan your takeover of the world, this isn't it. But if you're looking for something to play with friends or something to scratch that old-school itch, it's a nice little pickup. For the most part, Risk is a rather generic but serviceable title that does what it needs to do. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Risk review photo
Lady Luck is a cruel mistress
Typically, board games involving just dice aren't my thing. I don't like playing a game in which I feel I have no control in whether I win or lose. Yahtzee is a prime example of this, while Risk is somewhere in between. Much ...

Coup photo
Coup

Popular bluffing card game Coup will be a videogame soon


First on iOS, later for Android and PC
Feb 09
// Darren Nakamura
When people talk about good games to ease newbies into board games, The Resistance is one that gets brought up often. Heck, we have even played a few games of it on our forums. It took the hidden team aspect of Werewolf, tra...
Pandemic Legacy photo
Pandemic Legacy

Cooperative board game Pandemic Legacy set to release October 8


Coinciding with Essen Spiel 2015
Jan 15
// Darren Nakamura
Pandemic has served as a primer to cooperative board games for many who have recently taken up the hobby. Last year Z-Man Games announced that Pandemic designer Matt Leacock and Risk Legacy designer Rob Daviau would be teamin...
Evolution review photo
Evolution review

Board Game Review: Evolution


A natural selection
Jan 01
// Darren Nakamura
[Note: We've been known to do board game reviews from time to time, and although this one isn't exactly based on E.V.O.: Search for Eden on the SNES, it's close enough. Happy New Year! --Chris Carter] Two things that def...
Deck building photo
Deck building

So what exactly is a deck-building game anyway?


Possibly not quite what you think
Oct 29
// Darren Nakamura
A number of videogames have shown up lately with the gameplay adjective "deck-building" in their descriptions. Steve Swink took a break from developing Scale in order to release Dad's Building a Deck. Coin...
Mega Man photo
Mega Man

Mega Man: The Board Game's final sculpts revealed


Approved by Capcom and ready to go
Oct 07
// Chris Carter
Mega Man: The Board Game is coming along rather nicely, and is entering the final stages of development. Jasco is handling the game itself, and although they had to get the Capcom seal of approval on just about every facet of...

Fibbage is a fun digital party game, even if you only have two people

Aug 26 // Chris Carter
The concept is very simple -- at the start of each round, all players will come up with a convincing "lie" to add to the multiple choice pool. So for a question like "this strange fishing rod sold at Hank's Goods in Camden, Maine is comprised of 70% [blank]" -- you might come up with "fish bones" or "endangered redwood." The real answer is usually something odd (but not always), and in this case, it's carrots. It's not all niche trivia, and I found myself knowing roughly one answer every three rounds or so. Setting up a game is also easy. All you have to do is go to fibbage.com on basically any device, then enter your name and the "room code" that each round displays on the screen -- that's it. I was able to get the game up and running on multiple tablets, smartphones, and PCs, and it's a good game to spring on people since they will likely always have their phones on them. Like any lie-based board game it's a blast to play with friends, as Fibbage shows you what everyone's fib was at the end of a round, and the satisfaction you'll get from successfully passing off a lie is amazing. It gets better the more players you add to the mix, but it's completely playable with two people, because it adds an extra "lie," on its own to keep you on your toes. Jackbox Games promises that there are "hundreds" of questions, and in roughly 40 games comprised of multiple rounds I haven't seen a repeat yet. Fibbage originally launched on the Amazon Fire TV, but you can find it on the Xbox One now and the PS3/PS4 in "early September."
Fibbage photo
It works for up to eight
I was randomly flipping through my email last week and saw a peculiar Xbox One release -- a little party game called Fibbage. Billed as a "fibbing" party game (the likes of which I'm sure you've seen before), this one has a ...

XCOM: The Board Game photo
XCOM: The Board Game

Fantasy Flight announces XCOM: The Board Game


Four player cooperative strategy
Aug 05
// Darren Nakamura
Fantasy Flight Games has a pretty good reputation for taking hit videogame franchises and translating them to the tabletop space. Previously, the publisher has released board games based on DOOM, StarCraft, Sid Meier's Civili...
Zelda Monopoly photo
Zelda Monopoly

Zelda Monopoly coming next month, with a GameStop exclusive version


The Ocarina piece is exclusive
Aug 04
// Chris Carter
Remember that Legend of Zelda Monopoly that was confirmed earlier this year? Well it's still a thing, and it's going to arrive on September 15 for $39.99. If you get it anywhere other than GameStop you're missing out on ...
 photo

League of Geeks' Armello reaches Kickstarter goal


Funded!
May 05
// Dale North
We recently told you about Armello, a game that creators League of Geeks calls a blend of Magic the Gathering, Final Fantasy Tactics, and board games. When we first mentioned it they were just getting going with a Kickstarter...
Guild of Dungeoneering photo
Guild of Dungeoneering

Guild of Dungeoneering takes us back to pen and paper days


For those with a soft spot for graph paper
May 01
// Darren Nakamura
Guild of Dungeoneering might as well be a board game. It has the look of a hastily doodled tabletop role-playing game, and it features tile-laying and hand management mechanics. Each turn, the player draws up to five cards, ...

Prodigy ventures to places most hybrid board/videogames shy away from

Apr 21 // Darren Nakamura
Prodigy (PC)Developer: Hanakai Studio The technology behind Prodigy is impressive. At the heart is the board, which connects to the computer and can detect certain objects placed on it via near field communication (NFC). The board is made up of a three-by-four square grid, and it not only recognizes the identity of NFC tags, but also their location on the grid. The opponent's board is represented on screen, where the physical moves are translated into action. These tags are built into the bases of figurines, allowing the player to move figures around the while the game tracks their locations. Additionally, NFC tags are embedded in the set of cards used to designate actions. For instance, on a player's turn during combat, he can move a figure from one part of the grid to another, then place the attack card on the board anywhere to cause that figure to perform a regular attack. There is a slight delay between placing a card and having the corresponding action executed on screen, but it seems fairly negligible. [embed]273502:53521:0[/embed] Combat during the PAX demo was easy to grasp. Each of the three rows on the board correspond to a different combat stance: figures in the front row gain an attack bonus but suffer a defense penalty, figures in the middle row have greater defense but only normal attack power, and figures in the back row have the sturdiest defense but cannot attack at all. Oddly, there are both melee and ranged attackers, but those attributes do not have an effect on placement. For normal attacks, a figure may only target enemy figures in the same column as itself, and only the nearest unit if there are multiple in one column. As a result, the larger, tank-like Guardian characters tend to take the front row, with weaker units in the middle row behind the Guardians. Of course, special attacks become available with areas of effect that can counter those tactics. Additionally, the Guardians provide the means for a player to gain mana and use special attacks, so keeping them alive is important for maintaining good damage output, so it is not necessarily best to let them soak up all the damage. One aspect of combat that was absent from the PAX demo (but promised for the final release) is that the Guardians are meant to drop mana around the board, giving players incentive to move. As it was, there was not much reason to do anything but stand in a line and throw down the most powerful attack available. What is probably most exciting unique about Prodigy was everything not being shown at PAX East. There will not only be tactical combat, but also node-based world map exploration and traditional dialogue trees. These will also be controlled by selecting a particular card and placing it on the board in order to confirm choice. Further, figures will be on the board in order to determine how they intend to tackle non-combat problems. For instance, figures in the front row may reach a destination more quickly, while figures in the back may have a better chance of finding items along the way. In the case of an ambush during one of these sections, the figure placement on the board determines the starting setup for the battle, cleverly blending the two sections together. Thus far, Prodigy is looking very cool. It is currently up on Kickstarter with eleven days left in the campaign, but has already surpassed its initial funding goal of $100,000. At about a hundred dollars (including shipping costs), it is about in line with higher end board games, but those approaching it from a videogame perspective may see the cost of entry as being too high. Regardless, the technology and the ideas behind it look very promising for role-playing enthusiasts from either side of gaming.
Prodigy photo
Exploration, dialogue, and character development, all controlled with cards on a board
With board games continuing to increase in popularity, it is no surprise that there has been a lot of crossover between that space and videogames. Not only are a lot of board games being adapted or reimagined digitally, but s...

Tabletop Simulator photo
Tabletop Simulator

Get your table-flipping on with Tabletop Simulator on Steam Early Access


When a table comes along, you must flip it
Apr 18
// Brittany Vincent
We've all been so mad we could flip a table, and for the longest time we've had to use outdated AOL RP-speak and emoticons to convey said anger electronically. Well, those days are over with the advent of Tabletop Simulator,...
Monopoly photo
Monopoly

Zelda and Pokemon Monopoly will make you scream 'shut up and take my Rupees!'


Coming this summer
Apr 09
// Brett Makedonski
Monopoly, a/k/a The Game That Never Ends And Destroys Families And Friendships, is adding some flair from Nintendo in the coming months. The Legend of Zelda and Pokemon will get their own iterations of the game on A...
Pure Chess photo
Pure Chess

That chess game with DLC is coming to the PS4


$14.99 for the complete edition
Apr 07
// Chris Carter
Pure Chess has already hit the Wii U and 3DS, but it's coming to the PS4 soon. VooFoo Studios released the game way back in 2012 on the PS3 and Vita, but has decided to start porting it to current systems, hence the new release date. It'll ring in at $7.99 for the basic version, or $14.99 for all the DLC. Yes, there's DLC in a chess game.
Pure Chess photo
Pure Chess

This Wii U and 3DS chess game will have day one DLC


Haha, what?
Mar 20
// Chris Carter
I don't know why, but the prospect of "day one DLC" for a chess game on the Wii U and 3DS had me laughing for quite a bit. Developer VooFoo is all set to launch Pure Chess this week, and you'll have to fork over some cas...
 photo

Connect 4: Super Mario edition is a thing that is happening


NINTENDO IS SAVED
Mar 04
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Nintendo is developing an exciting new analog gaming product called Connect 4: Super Mario. It's just like Connect 4, except now the coins you insert into the slots have Mario and Luigi faces on them. How thrilling! It's comi...
Mega Man Board Game photo
Mega Man Board Game

Pre-orders open for the Mega Man Board Game


Estimated delivery of October 2014
Feb 19
// Chris Carter
The Mega Man Board Game Kickstarter opened with a reasonable $70,000 goal, but it went on to reach a lofty $415,041 at closing. A ton of add-ons have been announced and are being worked into the updated version of the game, a...
The Witcher photo
The Witcher

Take on monsters in the Witcher Adventure Game


It's actually a board game, not a point-'n'-click title
Jan 08
// Alasdair Duncan
Whilst fantasy RPG fans like myself bide their time until the arrival of The Witcher 3 later this year, we might have another game set in the world of Geralt of Rivia. The Witcher Adventure Game isn't actually a point-'n'-cl...
Mega Man Board Game photo
Mega Man Board Game

20 minute video shows how Mega Man: The Board Game works


It's not all that complicated if you're a table top fan
Jan 08
// Chris Carter
The folks over at Jasco have put together a rather lengthy video of a playthrough of Mega Man: The Board Game. It'll take you through setup, a typical turn, how the pieces look while in play, and pretty much everything in-be...
Collusion Kickstarter photo
Collusion Kickstarter

Hybrid board/videogame Collusion full of lies and deceit


Like chocolate and peanut butter with backstabbing
Jan 06
// Darren Nakamura
As a fan of board games and videogames, my ears perk up when I hear about developers attempting to combine the two in interesting ways. Especially exciting are games focusing on subterfuge, deception, backstabbing, and lies....
Mega Man board game photo
Mega Man board game

Mega Man The Board Game is going international


The Kickstarter is still pretty healthy
Dec 30
// Chris Carter
The Mega Man Board Game is a thing that's happening, and starting today, international pledges will be honored. The gates have opened for Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and the Middle East, which is a major upgrade from the ...

Getting to know the people behind the Mega Man Board Game

Dec 14 // Chris Carter
Destructoid: So who initially approached whom with the concept for a Mega Man board game? Did you outright ask Capcom for permission, or did they reach out to Jasco first? Jason: I was up working in the middle of the night at a Best Western in Manhattan two summers ago. I wrote down the concept for the game (specifically a Mega Man game) and then fell back to sleep. Months later we approached Capcom about licensing both Mega Man and Darkstalkers for our upcoming plans and the rest is history! Did you anticipate your project to be funded this quickly? It hasn't even been 24 hours and you've already exceeded your lofty goal. We certainly hoped it would go this well, but we were all very nervous, anxious and excited to see how our project would do. We've put almost two  years into the development, design and testing of this and we believe that if we get enough funding to produce our entire dream, fans will love us!  What went into the decision to focus exclusively on the first Mega Man game? We know how important many of the characters, robot masters, and classic stages are in each of the Mega Man games. Because of that we wanted to really focus on each game one at a time. If the funding allows us, we want to make everyone's favorite characters and stages a possibility in future expansions. Can you tell us a bit more about your relationship with the Archie Comics team, since a lot of the art from the comics is used for the game? We have a good relationship with Archie Comics. We worked with them extensively on the Mega Man Universal Fighting System (UFS) card game. The board game itself is actually not going to use much Archie artwork. We have hired out our own team (see cover art) and we are using it as place holders until more artwork is done. Can you explain a bit about what goes into the deck-building element of the game, and how you decided to use this mechanic rather than dice for movement? So the balancing of your deck is very important to strategy. We like to consider ourselves somewhat expert at creating great card games, and used our expertise to add to the board game experience. The history of Jasco Games (coming from Sabertooth Games and Fantasy Flight Games backgrounds) has always had a deck-based dice element.  From War Cry (Warhammer CCG) to Warhammer 40K CCG to The Universal Fighting System, there has always been this awesome mechanic. What it does is removes some of the "Luck" factor and allows players to design their deck to "roll" the numbers they think they need. From a game balancing side of the design process, it also allows us to make the good die rolls have slightly less impressive abilities and the bad die rolls to have amazing abilities. This puts the player into a decision of do I want to roll well, or get awesome abilities to use when I build my deck? Then they have to remember that some numbers on their dice will do special things at certain times in the game so they will need a balance of 1s through 6s. The other big reason for no dice, is they don't determine how far you move. The challenges on each stage will, so rolling a die for movement wouldn't help you anyway in Mega Man The Board Game.  Do you have any plans to sell the game pieces individually? Do certain goals need to be met for those fans who don't necessarily want the game, but just the figures as a collector's item? We do plan to sell add-ons individually for collectors. Now the minis in the core games will only be available that way under our current plans, but all of the extras are planned to be available. Do you have any retail plans for the game currently? What will be the best way for people to pick it up post Kickstarter? We have partnered with coolstuffinc.com and Southern Hobby Supply to really push this thing after launch. We also have over 500 retail stores we work with already and will be bringing on someone full time to try to push the game into mass market stores like Hastings, Game Stop, Walmart, Target, Barns & Nobles, Toys R' Us, etc. If this project does well, does the Capcom license potentially allow for further board games in the future? Are there any Mega Man sub-franchises in particular that the team is eager to explore? We do have several plans for our Blue Bomber. Currently, the Mega Man Board Game and Universal Fighting System expansions as well as two other projects we have in the works. We are also working on the Darkstalkers license and have some very exciting things to announce at GAMA in Las Vegas this Spring! What would be an estimated timeline for the game's shipment, now that you've met your Kickstarter goal? We have it planned to ship out in October, but we will be pushing for as early a release as possible. We would love to see this come out before the Summer (fingers crossed)! Thanks for your time, Jason!
Mega Man Board Game photo
How does one approach Capcom with an idea like this?
It's safe to say that the Mega Man Board game Kickstarter is a massive success. In just under 24 hours it cleared $150,000, which far exceeds its $70,000 goal. But in an odd turn of events, Capcom is not funding the game -- t...

Mega Man board game photo
Mega Man board game

Mega Man: The Board Game kicks off its Kickstarter


The final concept revealed in video
Dec 12
// Chris Carter
In case you hadn't heard, board game manufacturer Jasco is producing a Mega Man tabletop game with the approval of Capcom, and now, they have a live Kickstarter. It's meant for two to five players (barring future expans...

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