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Bethesda

Zelda photo
Zelda

Of course someone modded Zelda into Fallout 4


It's basically a requirement
Dec 10
// Chris Carter
For years, some of my favorite PC mods have been homages. It's easy to plan it out on paper, but much harder to actually sit down and create -- while I previously had time to do that in the past, I pretty much leave it to the...
Fallout 4 basketball photo
Fallout 4 basketball

Watch this Fallout 4 radioactive hoops master do his thing


No easy buckets at the end of the world
Dec 09
// Nic Rowen
Defend the House puts on a post-apocalyptic basketball clinic in this short video. With some intricate set-ups, nerves of steel, and a little help from his friend Jet, this wastelander manages to finagle Fallout 4's clumsy ph...
Bethesda photo
Bethesda

Bethesda just opened up a new Montreal studio with a mobile and console focus


Expanding core team
Dec 09
// Chris Carter
Bethesda Game Studios has announced it is adding another base of operations in the decidedly non-Bethesda area of Montreal, Quebec, to "expand its development capabilities in console, PC, and mobile gaming." Note that la...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Fallout 4 looks right at home with an isometric camera


Old school Black Isle Studios
Dec 08
// Chris Carter
Although Bethesda has done a fine enough job with the new Fallout games, they pale in comparison to the older games, done by Black Isle Studios under Interplay (except for Obsidian's amazing Fallout: New Vegas, of course...
The Elder Scrolls Online photo
The Elder Scrolls Online

Want to play The Elder Scrolls Online for free?


Here's everything you need to know
Dec 08
// Vikki Blake
Always fancied giving The Elder Scrolls Online a try but haven't yet been able to commit? Here's hoping you have some free time this weekend as Bethesda is giving you the chance to try before you buy.  From Thursday, Dec...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Fallout 4's first patch is boring, but probably necessary


Functional's good too
Dec 07
// Brett Makedonski
Sometimes, video game patches sort out or enable quirky features. For instance, The Witcher 3 had one earlier this year where severed heads no longer disappeared. That's a good patch! Developer CD Projekt Red was like "P...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Amazon has the Fallout 4 Pip-Boy Edition back in stock again


Maybe for the last time
Dec 04
// Brett Makedonski
Thanks to a bunch of cancellations, Amazon has some stock of the Fallout 4 Pip-Boy Edition to sell again. For those who don't know, that's the one that come with a big old wearable Pip-Boy that operates by use of your ph...
Elder Scrolls Online photo
Elder Scrolls Online

Bethesda will literally pay you to play The Elder Scrolls Online


But only if you're lucky
Dec 03
// Alissa McAloon
One The Elder Scrolls Online player is about to have their loyalty rewarded. As a response to its #MillionReasonsToPlay campaign, Bethesda has announced that it will be giving away $1 million to a single, lucky player. O...
Toy Story mod photo
Toy Story mod

Buzz Lightyear is a good look in Fallout 4


Fun with mods
Dec 01
// Steven Hansen
Toy Story's Buzz Lightyear has come to Fallout 4, which is probably beyond infinity from some perspective. This very spot on power armor can be put on Paladin Danse with a little bit or work (and a little download of the mod). The hood really does sell the ensemble. Don't forget it. Instructions are on the mod page (you'll have to manually give Danse the armor, but it's all pretty simple.

The wastelander's guide to building settlements in Fallout 4

Nov 28 // Nic Rowen
Creating your character to be a wasteland real estate mogul  Before you lay down the foundations of your personal empire, you need to get yourself right first. If you want to be serious about your settlements, you'll need a few perks to make it work, including a hefty investment in charisma. This could be tricky if you've already been playing for 50 hours with an anti-social radioactive super soldier and just now want to start rebuilding the Commonwealth, but not un-doable (remember, you can get a charisma-boosting bobblehead at the insane asylum and invest perk points into S.P.E.C.I.A.L. stats if you really need to get that number up, among other less savory methods that I'll discuss later). You can also just roll up a new character specifically made to dive into the building and crafting aspect of the game. You'll need six Charisma to get two levels of the Local Leader perk and at least level two of the Cap Collector perk. These will let you make supply lines (ESSENTIAL) and awesome stores in your settlements. You'll probably also want to go deep on Intelligence -- the Gun Nut and Science! perks are practically necessary if you want to build the best versions of generators and defense turrets and Scrapper is a little too good to ignore (it will let you turn all those junky laser pistols and pipe rifles you normally throw in the dumpster into useful copper, gears, and circuitry). I know, it sucks that the way crafting in Fallout 4 works basically pigeonholes you into a certain build. There is still plenty of room for creativity even after those stat demands though and the joy of raising a civilization out of the ashes of history does take the sting out a bit. The basics you probably already know If you want your settlement to grow, you'll need a few things: water, food, beds, and a radio beacon. Each settler you bring in needs one unit of food and water per day and they get whiny if they don't have a nice downy pillow to rest their head on at night, so you'll want to get those things sorted first. Plant a few crops (easily done by raiding other farms for their crops and it quickly becomes self-perpetuating when you can just harvest your own fields for planting supplies), install two or three water pumps, and flop down a few beds. No need to go crazy, it takes a settlement time to grow and you can always add more as needed (and later crafting options can make old ones obsolete so no need to waste scrap on something you won't need). A radio beacon draws a steady flow of new settlers to your homestead. You'll need a power source to run it so build a generator (which will come in handy for other things, anyway). Remember, you can turn a radio beacon off when you think you have enough settlers in one place. In some of the smaller areas like the Red Rocket station near the beginning of the game, you may want to put a cap on the number of people you take in. You'll probably want to defend your patch once you have it all set up. Turrets are the go-to option for this (and why you need Science! and Gun Nut so badly so you have access to the upgraded versions). Each turret, trap, or manned guard tower adds a few points to the defense rating of a settlement. Try to keep that number the same or slightly higher than the sum of both the food and water points to discourage attacks. When an attack does occur, you will be notified on your Pip-Boy and can help your settlers defend their home. Raids on your property can be unpredictable. In my time responding to would-be home invaders, I've seen everything from realistic flanking attacks from Super Mutants pouring over the hills, to packs of feral Ghouls somehow spawning deep inside the walls of a fortified base. Your best bet is to spread out your defenses to cover likely avenues of attack while also covering populated areas where your settlers are likely to take a stand. Building things! You could just work with what each settlement already has, but what is the fun in that? Leave your personal mark on the wasteland with a proud series of ramshackle apartments, abodes, and disturbingly militaristic forts. The tools for building things in Fallout 4 are honestly pretty terrible. Objects float about in weird ways, mechanics are never explained unless you go digging through the help topics in the menu (and even then it's hit or miss), and the way walls and attachments snap (or fail to snap) together will give you no end of grief. But don't let that stop you! With a little patience and a few pointers, you can make some reasonably cool-looking digs for your wastelanders. If someone could make this monstrosity of wires and pressure pads work, you can probably get a few fences to stand up straight. First thing first, lay down a foundation and a floor. Uneven terrain tends to mess with the building tools so you'll want to keep things as level as possible to make things easier on yourself. Try to build up! Many of the settlement areas have limited usable ground space. Small areas strewn with debris and hills do not make for nice buildings, but you can avoid that problem by building vertically. Don't be afraid to slap down ladders and staircases and build on top of what is already there. Not only is it space efficient, but a rad tower fort on top of the local Red Rocket station looks much cooler than a bunch of square boxes crammed together on the parking lot. Set up supply lines from a central hub to make life easier. Trying to cart around tin cans and microscopes between settlements and keeping track of which place has what is a suckers game. With the Local Leader perk you can assign a settler to run supplies between locations and everyone can share from the same pool of salvage (but not hard items like guns or armor). Make a supply chain by assigning one runner from settlement A to take goods to settlement B, and one from B to take goods to C, and so on. That way you can just toss all your junk in any workbench in the line and use all of it anywhere. Provisioners seem to be immortal like Companions, so don't worry about them dying on the road the first time they run afoul of some Mole Rats. Fences can really help with invasions by funneling attackers into kill zones as well as give your settlement a homey, lived-in look (murder and comfort together at last!). Sadly, when you start putting rings around all your settlements they also become material hogs, gobbling up steel and wood like nobody's business. I recommend you pick up an issue of Picket Fences from Beantown Brewery so you can make, well, picket fences. They don't consume steel when crafting them and they look more charming than rusty chain link (granted, they look slightly less so when splattered with Super Mutant blood). Light up the night How you provide power to your settlements is poorly explained in-game but essential for making a great homestead, so be prepared to mess with it. Basically, you have two kinds of powered devices at your disposal. Active devices like laser turrets and water purifiers that require units of power to run (meaning your generator has to be able to match their power draw to keep everything working), and passive devices like lights and traps that can run off the ambient grid. Active devices need a line running directly into them, while passive devices need either a nearby connected pylon or wall socket to work. Power pylons can be used to run line from a generator to far-away devices or a conduit. The maximum length of a wire is fixed, but can be cut short by obstacles, hanging on the ground, and so on. I recommend you build your generators in elevated positions to get the most out of your copper. Pylons give off a radius of electrical power that can be used to run lights, traps, and other things. Plugging a conduit into the wall of a building supposedly provides power to the entire shack, but my experience with them has been mixed. Mostly, they seem to work just like pylons (but are slightly cheaper to make and more compact to string up between nearby buildings). Making complex grids for my settlements has been hands down the single most frustrating and rewarding part of building things in Fallout 4. It's a very fussy system (I can't tell you how many times I broke everything trying to slightly adjust one little wall tile or light bulb) but once you get used to it, you can really make your settlements pop. Capitalism Ho! Shops are wonderful. While having to invest into two ranks of Local Leader and Cap Collector to make the biggest shops (which really is the only way to go) is a drag, what you get out of having a few shops spread among your networked settlements can be well worth it. There are six kinds of shops you can make for your settlements with four tiers of value. Each type of shop will boost your settlement's happiness and pull in caps, but a few stand out as handier to have in your personal base of operations than others. Weapon shops can be a reliable source of ammo without having to make a trip to Diamond City, trade goods shops can help cut down on the time it takes to scavenge for parts, clinics can help you cheaply cure addiction and radiation poisoning at your convenience, and bars are great for ingredients for cheap healing items. Armor and clothing shops are fun too and you'll probably want one of each in your network at some point just for variety, but they're not as overtly useful. You can build the first two tiers of shop with just the second level of the Local Leader perk. They're fine and will do the trick if you want to be a skinflint about it. But if you invest all the way to the third tier of shop by getting two levels of Cap Collector, your market stalls will start to carry surprisingly great gear. What's better is once you have tier-three stores, you'll occasionally run into special vendors in the wasteland that you can invite to work at your locations who will turn them into unique fourth-tier stores that carry special gear. Shops will generate an income you can draw from on their own -- just check your workbench from time to time and you'll notice you have a handful of caps you can pull out. But don't get the wrong idea: shops accrue money slowly, so you won't be diving into a vault of caps like Scrooge McDuck anytime soon. The value of having a nice network of shops is the convenience of being able to talk to a merchant on demand rather than wander around looking for a traveling trader or making a special trip. It lets you make more money off of explorations (you can trade found gear for caps more easily) and enables you to restock and refuel faster to get you back out in the wastes. Advanced DIY tips There are plenty of mechanics involved in the settlement system that the game doesn't go out of its way to tell you. I'll try and shed some light on them here. Did you know the maximum population of your settlements is tied to your Charisma stat? Ten people by default plus one extra per point of Charisma. For most people, this either means a 16 settler max, or up to 20 if you went whole-hog on Charisma. I'm told wearing Charisma-boosting gear can let you break that cap but I haven't noticed it in my game. Spread out your beds. For the longest time my settlers in Sanctuary were complaining about “the bed situation” despite having plenty of cots to rest on. At first I assumed it was a bug (this is a Fallout game), but I stumbled on some other people online having the same problem. Apparently, putting too many beds in one area causes makes your tired and poor wastelanders cranky (maybe they'd like it back in the wilds with the Deathclaws where I found them). I haven't found exact numbers, and testing for it is difficult, but it seems like four beds to one room or hut is the sweet spot. Water purifiers are a godsend and you should put them in any settlement that isn't landlocked. A single industrial water purifier will produce 40 units of water, far more than you'll ever need for a settlement on its own. Plus, extra water goes into your workbench as an aid item. You can pull out a bunch for cheap healing, or sell them all to a trader who wanders into your settlement for a stack of caps. Equip gear on your settlers for protection and convenience. Instead of scrapping or selling every spare gun you pick up, try placing it in a settler's inventory and have them equip it (use the triangle or Y button on the console controllers) and a single piece of ammunition for it (it will last them forever, thanks to Lex for the tip!). I know this might be really obvious, but I keep hearing from people who missed it! Not only will they be able to help next time a Super Mutant wanders into the neighborhood, but you can coordinate their outfits to help you keep track of what jobs people are doing. Or just give them a creepy uniform look if you want to make your own apocalypse cult. Each settler assigned to work on crops can sustain enough plants to generate six points of food. This means you only really need three or four full time farmers, which frees up the rest of your population for things like guard duty at watch towers, scavenging for supplies, or manning the tills at your shops. Speaking of guard posts, while they initially seem like a terrible deal (only a measly two defense for a manned post), if you set up multiple posts and assign a person to one of them, he or she will walk between up to three of them like a patrol and provide the defense benefit of each. So one person on guard duty watching three posts can actually provide a decent six defense; better than a level-one turret. Folks assigned to scavenging benches generate a small amount of junk for the workbench on their own. What they gather is fairly inconsequential, but something is better than nothing if you don't have them assigned to anything else. Interestingly enough, they tend to walk around with their weapons drawn, seemingly looking for a fight. Not sure why they do that, but I like to put the best of my spare weapons on them so they can be ready to draw down on any intruders. Build a bell! In the miscellaneous resources menu you can find a bell that will summon settlers to your location. This will save you loads of time when trying to assign jobs or equip folks since they can hide like ninjas when left to their own devices. I didn't find this until embarrassingly late in my game and it would have saved me a lot of time. In a nice little touch, settlers will congregate at a bar after hours if you build one. When the workday is over, everyone just wants a nice slice of grilled brahmin and a drink, I suppose. So maybe spend a little extra time laying out chairs and making your bar area look nice. Hey, you can always cheat I've really enjoyed building up my settlements, tinkering with the crafting tools, and spending entirely too much time equipping all of my little serfs with laser pistols and shotguns, but I'd be lying if I said it hasn't also been a chore. It just takes too long to collect all the knick-knacks and scrap you need to make things. I don't want to have to root around in some raider-infested warehouse looking for power coils and broken light bulbs for hours just to wire up some patio lights in my fifth fully-loaded farm house. Or maybe, like I mentioned earlier, you built your character to tame the wastes with hands made of concrete and a bulletproof hide. You didn't give any thought towards a useless dump stat like Charisma when you started the game. Now you're stuck looking at the unappealing idea of tossing multiple perk points into your stats just to start building decent settlements. So might I recommend cheating? If you're on PC, this is easy. Open up the console command line and go to town. If you are like me and playing on the PS4 (or Xbox One for that matter), you'll have to get a little more creative. There are two super easy exploits you can pull in the console version of Fallout 4 that will make building your settlements much easier. The first is the vendor scam, where you can clean out a vendor's entire stock (including all their junk and tasty shipments of fiber optics and oil) with some tricky re-selling. First, see what ammo a vendor is selling. The near-useless .38 is always a safe bet. Transfer most of that ammo type to a companion or drop it on the ground or you'll lose your own stash of it in the process, but keep 15 or 20 bullets in your inventory just to make the trick work. Next, click on the entire stack of that ammo from the vendor like you were going to buy it all. Hop over to your side of the trade window and sell back a single round of that ammo type from your tray, then sell the rest. If it worked right (it can be hinky and isn't always 100%) you should still have a phantom round left to sell. Mash on that until the vendor owes you a hundred caps or so, then flip back to their tray and “buy” the stack of ammo from them again. Weirdly, it will still count as you selling it and they'll owe you caps. The effect compounds and you can hit this multiple times until they owe you some ridiculous amount like 10k and then clean out their inventory for free. Now I'm delighted every time I bump into Trashcan Carla because I know it's another shipment of fine asbestos coming my way. This may be one of those things that's easier to watch than explain, so check out this video for a demonstration. [embed]323060:61293:0[/embed] When it comes to boosting your special stats, Dogmeat can help you with that. Head back to Sanctuary with him and check out your old house. In Shaun's room you should find a “You're S.P.E.C.I.A.L!” book on the ground that will immediately let you boost a stat of your choice. Once the book is in your inventory, find a nice level place (one of the cleared houses works fine) and get Dogmeat ready. Drop the book on the ground, call Dogmeat to pick it up, and JUST as he goes to snag it, pick it up yourself. The timing can be tricky since Dogmeat will grab stuff from different ranges (and generally act like a fool), but when done correctly, you should have a copy in your inventory while Dogmeat drops one at your feet. Drop them again and pick them up and one will let you boost another stat. You can do this again and again to raise your S.P.E.C.I.A.L points as much as you like. I'd recommend a light touch (completely overpowered characters quickly become boring), but this is a great option if you decide to get into crafting with an already developed character who doesn't have much in the way of Charisma or Intelligence. Exploits like this are going to be something players will have to come to or avoid on their own. Personally, I don't recommend cheating like this right off the bat. It can ruin the experience. But if you're 30 or 40 hours deep into the game and pulling your hair out because you built your character wrong at the start or just can't find enough oil to keep your turrets up and running, it's nice to have a safety net like this available. 
Settlement guide photo
A beacon in the wasteland
Okay, so you've been playing Fallout 4 since launch and you've wandered the wastes, scoured the ruins of Boston, and swam in the glowing sea. You've had a lot of adventures. Now you're thinking about settling down, and checki...

What is your favorite Bethesda era Fallout game?

Nov 27 // Chris Carter
[embed]322918:61286:0[/embed]
Fallout photo
New Vegas, baby
Barring the amazing original PC series, I want to know what people think of the newer takes on the Fallout franchise. I've seen so many conversations regarding Bethesda's reign, and although there's lots of love for Fallout 4...

Deals photo
Deals

Green Man Gaming squeezes into sale madness with Thursday deals


Aka Black Friday / Cyber Monday sale
Nov 26
// Dealzon
PC gamers aren't left out in the cold this Black Friday, what with the Steam Autumn sale and a myriad of other ongoing sales. Green Man Gaming is squeezing into the "me too" pie with a fresh batch of deals during its wee...
Fallout update notes photo
Fallout update notes

You can nab the first Fallout 4 update on Steam


I thought you'd be bigger
Nov 23
// Jordan Devore
Bethesda has released a beta version of the first Fallout 4 update on PC, and if you were expecting a bunch of sweeping changes and bug fixes, well, give it some time. New Features Number pad keys can now be used for remappi...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Bethesda: Fallout 4 console commands 'not supported or recommended' on PC


'Can very easily mess up save files'
Nov 23
// Chris Carter
In a very Bethesda-like fashion, messing around with console commands on the PC version of Fallout 4 might completely bug out your game more than it's already bugged out to begin with. Warning folks not to use the system...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

What hellish humans have you crafted with Fallout 4's character creator


Haha, these are amazing
Nov 23
// Chris Carter
Haha, man, I can't get over how good some of these Fallout 4 character creation templates are. Beavis and Butthead is probably my absolute favorite, but I've seen so many great garish creations over the past few weeks. A...
Fallout 4 cut weapon photo
Fallout 4 cut weapon

Cut Fallout 4 weapon resurrected by modder


Harpoons thrust into the sky
Nov 20
// Nic Rowen
From the murky brine of cut content and dummied out items, modder xxdeathknight72xx has returned to the surface with a most intriguing treasure. A curious harpoon gun that never made it into the game proper. The harpoon gun ...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

There's a Fallout 4 patch hitting PC next week


Console patch on the way later
Nov 20
// Laura Kate Dale
It's no secret that Fallout 4 is pretty damn buggy. Bethesda open world RPGs are not known for technical polish, and the development team knows that well. Thankfully, the first patch for the game will be rolling out next week...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

How to make sure you're extra super dead in Fallout 4


That's gotta hurt (locker)
Nov 19
// Brett Makedonski
What do you call a man with no arms and no legs floating in a lake? Bob! What do you call a man with no arms and no legs outside a door? Matt! What do you call a man with no arms and no legs flying across a post-apocalyptic wasteland? I...I don't have a dad joke for that one.
Tower of Flesh photo
Tower of Flesh

20 hours went into making this animated tower in Fallout 4


NSFW unless you work at a porn store
Nov 18
// Jed Whitaker
In the classiest video to ever feature Phil Collins' music, the aptly named Saucy Sausage shows us the massive tower they've built filled with an animated display the likes of which has never been seen in the wasteland. The ...
Fallout video photo
Fallout video

Fallout 4 at its unscripted best


Anything goes!
Nov 18
// Jordan Devore
Much has been said about Fallout 4's imperfect dialog system, but I haven't seen many people bring up the weird, occasionally hilarious things that can happen to you mid-conversation. This ten-second video is one such example. Perhaps even the perfect example.
Fallout 4 armor photo
Fallout 4 armor

If you're using power armor in Fallout 4, you'll want this torso piece


Radiation for the nation
Nov 18
// Nic Rowen
I've been really trying to break the “too good to use” curse in Fallout 4. Now that power armor consumes (semi) rare fusion cores whenever you use it, my natural instinct is to tinker and craft myself the perfect ...
We are all 12 photo
We are all 12

The dialogue in Fallout 4 is so much better as farts


I can't stop laughing at this
Nov 18
// Jed Whitaker
Some evil genius decided to completely redo all the voice dialogue in Fallout 4, only instead of words he uses fart sounds. Bethesda spent years writing and recording this dialogue, while this person made it better in just ov...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Who is your favorite Fallout 4 companion?


You have 13 choices
Nov 18
// Chris Carter
Fallout 4 has been out for long enough, so the time has come to start discussing the finer points of the game. I hope you've consulted Jordan's companions guide, and have located all 13 characters to accompany on your tr...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Fallout 4 mod lets you see full sentence dialogue prompts


No more accidental choices
Nov 18
// Laura Kate Dale
Fallout 4's streamlined dialogue options have been a divisive subject among players. Some love the more minimal interface, while others like myself wish we had a clearer idea of what exactly we were about to say. Thankfully, ...
Baby bombs photo
Baby bombs

Turn your baby into a bomb in Fallout 4


Well, all of your babies
Nov 17
// Steven Hansen
As someone who just wants his kids back, I associate with the plight of Fallout 4's player character. As someone who doesn't want to work too hard at it, I admire the ingenuity of Fallout 4 modder Trainwiz and their Atom Bom...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

We need to dirty that Pip-Boy up a little bit


As carefully as possible, of course
Nov 17
// Brett Makedonski
Anyone who got their hands on the wrist-encapsulating replica Pip-Boy with their copy of Fallout 4 might feel a dissonance between the dirty, grimy in-game world and the shiny coat of paint on the device. For a place wh...
Giger? I hardly even know photo
Giger? I hardly even know

Fallout 4 has the smallest Alien Easter egg


And it's not an Alien
Nov 17
// Steven Hansen
First, let me clear something up that also confused the shit out of me. Prometheus 2 is no longer called Alien: Paradise Lost, but instead Alien: Covenant and is coming in 2017 (as the second chapter in a prequel trilogy). Me...
Fallout myths photo
Fallout myths

Well, that's one way to enter a locked building in Fallout 4


Fallout 4 Mythbusters
Nov 16
// Jordan Devore
In this first Fallout 4 episode of the YouTube show Mythbusters, we're shown a trick to enter locked buildings. Turns out you can just peek through a window and sit on furniture to warp inside. There can't be very many locations where that would work, but it's amusing all the same. And speaking of amusing, try holding up an item the next time you chat with someone.
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Fallout 4 has a room with all the weapons and items, and it's easy to find


COC QASMOKE is the new IDKFA
Nov 16
// Brett Makedonski
Fallout 4's the type of game that's dripping with secrets for the community to discover. Its open world holds so much potential to hide things from players, knowing that they'll inevitably find them. One such room has been f...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Fallout 4 modder unleashes every legendary enemy at once


Battle Royale
Nov 16
// Chris Carter
Mods can elevate a game to make it better than the developer originally intended, or unleash some good old fashioned silly fun out into the world. This mod for Fallout 4 is the latter, as YouTuber Cosmic Contrarian basic...

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