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Atlus

ATLUS photo
ATLUS

The Legend of Legacy is out now in Europe


Ribbit
Feb 06
// Kyle MacGregor
The Legend of Legacy is now available across Europe, NIS America has announced. I wasn't too fond of the role-playing game when it launched in North America last fall, finding it to be a repetitive experience without muc...
Odin Sphere photo
Odin Sphere

Odin Sphere Leifthrasir hits Europe in June


Same as North America
Feb 04
// Kyle MacGregor
Vanillaware's Odin Sphere remake is coming to Europe this June, NIS America just announced. The PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, and PlayStation Vita action RPG will be available both at retail and via the PlayStation Store with...
Odin Sphere trailer photo
Odin Sphere trailer

Storybook time! Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir's first English trailer


Die art, die
Feb 01
// Steven Hansen
Now that Odin Sphere's Leifthrasir remake is out in Japan, Vanillaware can focus on the areas that really matter: the Americas. We're getting the 2D action-RPG on PS3, PS4, and PS Vita in the Americas on June 7, 2016 and so ...
Persona photo
Persona

These Persona and Seinfeld mashups never get old


'Perseinfeld'
Feb 01
// Chris Carter
"Perseinfeld" is a joke that's been running for quite some time, but it hasn't really gotten old yet. Folks all over the world have mashed up Persona 4 and Seinfeld to great success, mostly due to the absurd nature ...

Odin Sphere photo
Odin Sphere

Odin Sphere is now officially a browser game


You can play it now
Feb 01
// Chris Carter
Vanillaware said it was working on it, and last weekend, the studio released the Odin Sphere 8-bit browser game. You play as Gwendolyn, who has a standard attack, aerial dive attack, and a glide at her disposal. I h...

Review: The Deadly Tower of Monsters

Jan 19 // Chris Carter
The Deadly Tower of Monsters (PC [reviewed], PS4)Developer: ACE TeamPublisher: AtlusReleased: January 19, 2016MSRP: $14.99 The silly audio "DVD" commentary right from the start helps cement that B-movie feel Deadly is going for. Permeating through the menus, the "director" of the "movie" you're playing will continue to comment on your actions throughout, much like the narrator from Bastion. This narration however is a bit wackier, and will make fun of everything from gamey elements like finding useful items instantly in unexpected places, why items disappear after you pick them up (the hero "beams" them back to his ship), and how the actors got into a particular costume. He even boasts in one early scene that having his female lead rescue his male lead is progressive, and how he was "ahead of his time" for it. It's amusing enough to keep one interested throughout. So how does it play? Well, it's basically an isometric action game, with twin-stick shooting and melee attacks. The latter can be charged for effect, and players can also roll, or hover with a jetpack in a double jump of sorts. It's a small thing, but intuitive health bars circle each enemy, so you know exactly how much of a beating they'll need. There's also three playable characters available -- Dick Starspeed, Scarlet Nova, and Robot. All of them have unique powers at their disposal, but for the most part, the choice is aesthetic. What I really like about Deadly Tower is how fresh the game constantly keeps things. At first I thought it was going to be a simple sci-fi spoof with aliens, but it's so much more than that. There's Planet of the Ape-esque monkey men, "Energy Imps," a Ghost Pirate ship, and so much more that I won't spoil here. The gimmick is really cool as well, in that the entire game takes place on a gigantic tower that extends from the ground level of an alien planet all the way to space. Players will slowly climb said tower with checkpoints, which you can instantly teleport to after obtaining them. [embed]334028:61857:0[/embed] Great camera work also helps show off these environments in a big way, and I love how you can alter the visuals and music from "DVD" quality to the worse "VHS" setting. Cutscenes can also be fast-forwarded even upon the initial viewing, and there's several funny effects such as a forced black and white section for "budgetary reasons. ACE Team also goes full hog when it comes to the theme -- I'm talking Ray Harryhausen-like stop-motion animation in some cases. If it sounds jarring it really isn't, as the player character is always on point, so the framerate doesn't necessarily drop when enemies like that appear. "For those who are curious, here are the PC visual options and the control scheme. The best part though is the freefalling system. From any point of the tower you can jump off, starting a falling animation that allows you to aim and shoot downwards, collecting helpful objects in the air as you descend. It's a rush to jump off really high points and just take in the scenery, and boss fights that incorporate this mechanic are even more fun. The fact that you can use an "air teleport" system at the touch of a button to return to the point where you fell and teleport to any checkpoint at any time is the icing on the cake, allowing a large degree of freedom when it comes to exploration. This is especially helpful on PC, where I encountered two crashes in my first playthrough. When I loaded the game again I picked up right back where I left off. Despite all my praise though, you should know what you're getting into. My first playthrough only took me roughly three hours to complete, and I managed to spend an extra hour looking for artifacts and completing additional objectives. There doesn't seem to be any option for a New Game+ or the ability to alter the difficulty, which definitely stings a bit despite its strong initial run. I can definitely see replaying it every so often however, and jumping off of the top of the tower is something I did many, many times. The Deadly Tower of Monsters is a fleeting experience, but one that no B-movie fan should go without. I have a few issues with the loot and upgrade systems (namely in that they feel superfluous), but as a straight action game, it mostly succeeds in what it sets out to do. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Deadly Tower review photo
Harryhausen would be proud
I was lucky enough to grow up with parents who had a penchant for classic films, and B-humor. Hell, their first date was Monty Python and the Holy Grail, and as a child, I was raised with an endearment to the craft,...

Atlus CROSS photo
Atlus CROSS

Atlus confirms Persona 5 release, hints unannounced games will bring popular series together


FE x SMT x Persona x Etrian Odyssey x Du
Jan 12
// Steven Hansen
It's not that I have severe trust issues stemming from broken homes and unfeeling society, Atlus. It's just that I've been burned before. So when I hear Atlus CEO Naoto Hiraoka saying in Famitsu, according to Hachima Kikou wi...
Odin Sphere date photo
Odin Sphere date

Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir has a June release in North America


Scrumptious
Jan 12
// Jordan Devore
Atlus is launching Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir this week in Japan, but there will unsurprisingly be more waiting involved for the Western release. The 2D action-RPG is hitting PS3, PS4, and PS Vita in North America on June 7, 2016. Details on the European release are unknown at this time. For now, though, there's a new website full of oh-so-pretty Vanillaware artwork.
Shin Megami Tensei IV photo
Shin Megami Tensei IV

Watch close to an hour of Shin Megami Tensei IV Final footage


By way of an Atlus stream
Dec 30
// Chris Carter
We just saw a brand new trailer for Shin Megami Tensei IV Final, but now Atlus has gone and done a livestream of the game, clocking in at nearly two hours. All of it isn't gameplay (that starts 45:00 in, with tons of artwork ...
SMT IV: Final trailer photo
SMT IV: Final trailer

Shin Megami Tensei IV Final's new trailer is full of demons


Every time a bell rings...
Dec 25
// Ben Davis
Atlus released the second trailer for Shin Megami Tensei IV Final today. This one focuses primarily on the demons and main characters, with bits of gameplay mixed in throughout. I never did play the original Shin Megami...

New Persona 5 plot points differentiate it from previous games

Dec 09 // Steven Hansen
[embed]325538:61467:0[/embed] Ryuji meets the protagonist in April, on the first day of school, and ends up a crucial part of starting the group of phantom thieves. With a shared secret, and their loyal reliance on each other, he and the protagonist make great partners in crime. He has kind of a mischievous personality, and through their exploits as the phantom thieves, he wants to reform society and make their names infamous around the world. Ann is one of the game’s heroines. Since she’s lived abroad, she has a distinct, foreign air about her that draws people’s attention. However, they also tend to keep her at an emotional distance because of it. Yusuke has great artistic talent, and he’s seen as an oddball who thinks differently than most people. Lastly, there’s Morgana... At first glance, you might assume [he or she is] merely the mascot character of this title, but [he or she is] quite well-informed on the strange 'other world'; more so than the protagonist and his team. Morgana, the protagonist's gender-less (so far) live-in cat, doesn't understand its own origin, and is seeking answers. It seems like Persona 5 is trying to raise more questions in general, versus cobbling together a feel-good group (not that the series doesn't get grim). "Picaresque heroes are fun, and you might enjoy their exploits or admire them in a work of fiction, but whether you’d actually want to be like them is a whole different story, isn’t it?" Hashino asks. "That's our stance in this game. A group of high school kids, dreaming of becoming masked vigilantes, try to cause a big stir in society. It's quite different from the previous games' protagonists who had no choice but to solve the mysteries they were confronted with. We think that sense of agency is one of the charms of this title." Party members' Persona's appearance are meant to reflect the characters' personality, though the protagonist isn't a French crime literature nerd though his Persona, Arsène, comes from the French literary tradition that Lupin the Third comes from. "The general public's love towards famous, fictional picaresque heroes manifest as Personas for the team," Hashino said. Basically everything Hashino says about Persona 5 leads me to believe we're in for the appropriate post-Catherine turn for the series despite the familiarity and high school setting. I mean, check the theme, something so many games seem to lack entirely: "mankind’s tendency to each view the world through their own individually distorted sense of reality – and its consequences on society and relationships." Dope! I am jazzed to play this for 14 hours a day at the exclusion of all else, including friends, family, and hygiene, as I did with Persona 4: Golden. New Persona 5 Details You Won’t Find Anywhere Else [Game Informer]
Persona 5 details photo
Active not reactive
Game Informer has new Persona 5 details you won't find anywhere else, well, except for here, or any other place you're reading them in summation, thanks to an interview with director Katsura Hashino. Hashino explains how the ...

Deadly Tower of Monsters photo
Deadly Tower of Monsters

Atlus' Deadly Tower of Monsters will arrive in January


Look at that screenshot
Dec 02
// Chris Carter
We haven't heard a lot out of Atlus' (and Ace Team's) camp in regards to Deadly Tower of Monsters, but a whole lot of info just rolled out today. For one, just look at and bask in the glory of that screenshot above. Als...
Odin Sphere photo
Odin Sphere

Here's every Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir character trailer


Glorious
Nov 27
// Chris Carter
The Odin Sphere remake is coming as early as January in Japan (later in the year elsewhere), and Atlus is sufficiently pumping us up with character trailers for all of the old cast members. All of the usual suspects -- V...
SMT X FE photo
SMT X FE

Bask in the glory of more Shin Megami Tensei x Fire Emblem weirdness


Love those costumes
Nov 20
// Chris Carter
More Shin Megami Tensei x Fire Emblem (Genei Ibun Roku #FE in Japan) weirdness awaits. This time, admist the peppered-in combat sequences, there's a commercial for soda, lots of fantastic costumes, and even some anime c...
Japan Warriors poll photo
Japan Warriors poll

Persona or SMT Warriors? Atlus says 'get in touch with us anytime'


Or Final Fantasy Warriors?
Nov 19
// Steven Hansen
A recent Famitsu poll asked fans what Koei Tecmo Warriors (or Musou) crossover they'd most want to see and Gematsu has the Sokuho@Hokanko translation of the results, as well as responses by those series' respective creators o...
Atlus x Vanillaware photo
Atlus x Vanillaware

Odin Sphere has a great collector's edition


By Odin's Beard!
Nov 18
// Jordan Devore
Atlus sure knows how to put a special edition together. For Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir, a remake whose name I dare not type out manually, the publisher has a $79.99 Storybook Edition planned. It's exclusive to PlayStation 4 and...
SMT IV: Final photo
SMT IV: Final

Shin Megami Tensei IV: Final gets original SMT IV cast


Including one party member
Nov 17
// Steven Hansen
Atlus is embracing confusing naming conventions with the upcoming Shin Megami Tensei IV: Final, which Atlus has billed as not a direct sequel to SMTIV (you don't have to have played it to play Final) when we last wrote about...
Odin Sphere photo
Odin Sphere

Want to play an 8-bit version of Odin Sphere in your browser? Take to Twitter


28,888 tweets needed
Nov 14
// Chris Carter
Atlus of Japan has just announced a neat little promotion for their upcoming ports of Odin Sphere. If 28,888 people tweet out that they're interested, we'll unlock an 8-bit browser version of the game. Based on the footage i...

Review: Stella Glow

Nov 13 // Chris Carter
Stella Glow (3DS)Developer: ImageepochPublisher: AtlusMSRP: $49.99Release Date: November 17, 2015 Our journey begins with Alto, a young man who (surprise) has amnesia, and is found by a girl named Risette, who takes him into her mother's house. Three years later Alto encounters Hilda, a "sort of good sort of bad" witch, who is commonly referred to as "The Witch of Disaster" -- with a name like that, who wouldn't be inclined to be bad sometimes? Risette then unlocks an ancient power from one of Alto's artifacts, and becomes a witch herself -- then it's off to the royal palace, where they are tasked with hunting Hilda by recruiting more witches. You can probably guess where it goes from here. Alto is a country boy of sorts, but accepts to call to become a reluctant "aw shucks" shonen sword master. The rest of the party runs the gamut of anime tropes, and while they can occasionally get annoying, the cast is memorable enough and all sport a great set of designs. There are a few nuanced storylines peppered in, like the tale of a misunderstood witch who was doomed to live as an outcast. Another character hides her face in a cardboard box because she's shy, but wears revealing clothing. The cast is massive, and since there's no "job" switching in Stella Glow, all of them act unique both in and out of combat. Speaking of combat, much like the Arc series, it's still a lot like Final Fantasy Tactics. Utilizing chibi characters on a grid-like format, players can move about the battlefield, use items or skills, and choose to "wait" in a specific direction to guard against directional attacks. A lot of games still use the grid style because it works, even to this day. There's a certain order to it that warrants a respect beyond relegating it to "old school nostalgia," and planning out party movements and attacks is never a chore. When you're actually engaged with an enemy an Advanced Wars style miniature cutscene will play, and as expected, some characters have counter-attacks available. As previously stated, the cast really makes a different here, as some party members have access to special abilities like guarding characters they're adjacent to, which makes placement paramount. Don't expect a whole lot of depth and customization though (stats are applied instantly, and equipment management isn't all that difficult, even accounting for the materia-like socket system). [embed]320467:61085:0[/embed] Really, the game isn't all that tough in general. I feel like it will be challenging enough for those of you who don't keep up with the genre, but for veterans, you'll rarely find a taxing quest until later in the storyline. This is partially due to the fact that the AI isn't overly aggressive, and tends to hang back more, waiting for a better opportunity to strike. On the flipside, that means that there's no frustrating fake difficulty spikes for the sake of it. Like most SRPGs, Stella is hella long. There's at least 40 hours of gameplay here if you only opt for the story, and leveling up characters, locating the additional endings (over 10), completing sidequests and sidestories will likely elevate it to double that. Like most games with a billion endings, your mileage may vary depending on your affinity towards a specific character, but the ones I saw ranged from unsatisfying to sufficient. For those you are wondering, the voicework is in English, and the songs, which are heavily woven into the game's narrative, are performed in Japanese. In many ways, Stella Glow is a by-the-numbers strategy RPG, but it does have a partially interesting cast, some unique storylines, and a working combat system. Imageepoch has had some ups and downs in their lengthy career, but thankfully they can at least end on somewhat of a high note. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Stella Glow photo
Imageepoch's swan song
That's all she wrote for Imageepoch. The developer responsible for the Luminos Arc series and Arc Rise Fantasia filed for bankruptcy earlier this year, and it seems like they're out of the industry entirely with the laun...

NSFW photo
NSFW

What is going on with this Dragon's Crown figure?


Mesmerizing in all the wrong ways
Nov 11
// Jordan Devore
I'm almost at a loss for words other than to say you don't know what you've got until it's gone. The last Dragon's Crown Amazon figure (that I've seen, anyway) was over the top in ways you would expect given the source material, but that design now looks respectable compared to what's happening here. If you don't mind my asking, uh, what exactly is happening here?
Shin Megami Tensei photo
Shin Megami Tensei

Man, Shin Megami Tensei x Fire Emblem looks so weird


In a good way
Nov 06
// Chris Carter
Recently, I forgot that Shin Megami Tensei x Fire Emblem (known as Genei Ibun Roku FE in Japan) existed, but a new series of videos from Nintendo have reignited my interest. Highlights from this newest promotion in...
The Legend of Legacy photo
The Legend of Legacy

Legend of Legacy travels to Europe February 5


But beware the grind
Oct 30
// Kyle MacGregor
The Legend of Legacy is coming to Europe on February 5, NIS America has announced. The role-playing game from FuRyu draws inspiration from Square Enix's SaGa series, following a collection of seven adventurers on a journey to...

Review: The Legend of Legacy

Oct 26 // Kyle MacGregor
The Legend of Legacy (3DS)Developer: FuRyuPublisher: Atlus USARelease:  January 22, 2015 (JP) October 13, 2015 (NA) February 5, 2016 (EU)MSRP: $39.99 The expedition rings hollow from the outset, presenting players with a diversity of characters, all of whom have a unique opening sequence. It's a seductive come-on, one that hints at a multi-sided story that never manifests. The narrative threads converge almost immediately and then vanish, leaving players to explore Avalon with little impetus for hours at a time. The script is sapped by an absurd lack of dialogue, which prevents the cast from distinguishing themselves and essentially renders them stock characters. The Legend of Legacy, hamstrung by its sparse narrative and superficial characters, is forced to lean squarely on a repetitive formula. From the time it begins to the moment the credits roll, players will travel to a location, explore every nook and cranny there to create a maps, then sell that to a merchant. You can then pay the merchant for new destinations to explore, map, profit on, and repeat. Much like the story, The Legend of Legacy's exploration and combat components manage to leave a strong first impression, but they lose their effectiveness over time. It's almost as though FuRyu stumbled across an ingredient list for an excellent dish, but got the proportions all wrong. Individually, elements have the potential to be wonderful; they just don't come across that way in the melting pot. The turn-based battle system has some promise, allowing players to switch between various combat formations. Depending on the formations, individual characters will receive bonuses pursuant to their roles in battle. A defender will use a buckler to shield allies from damage, while a support character heals, and someone else attacks. While there are only two formations at the outset, players are given the ability to create their own -- an option that would be enticing if the battle system were deeper and it felt necessary. What might have been a strategic highlight soon curdles and becomes rote. The experience suffers from diminishing returns, with systems encouraging players to settle on a finite number of battle strategies and seldom deviate from them. Rather than have characters level-up, individual skills do. So, repeated use of, say, a sword will make a character more proficient with that type of weapon. But should one give that character an axe, bow, spear, or even a larger sword, they'll be back at square one, meaning it's beneficial to to decide which characters and weapons to use early on and stick with those choices, rather than experiment at all. In addition to impelling players to perform the same actions again and again, The Legend of Legacy doubles down on the repetition with a shortfall of enemy variety. The species of monster from a forest environment might reappear in the desert or alongside one another as palette swaps, a small irritation that just serves to compound a feeling of monotony that's pervasive throughout the game. Even endearing qualities, like the pop-up book-style visuals, which sees terrain and scenery sprout out from the ground, can cut both ways. Aesthetically, environments look very nice, but have a way of concealing enemies. And in a game with far too many fights for its own good, stumbling into a battle on accident due to a bit of poor camera positioning can be so exasperating. It also feels too focused and even reserved to a fault. At a time when many of its peers seem so enamored with heavy-handed tutorials and overabundance of side content, FuRyu is running in the opposite direction. This is an experience that could desperately use something to do other than plod along the critical path, or do a better job explaining some its more mystifying gameplay systems. If this appraisal sounds overly critical, it's because it comes from a place of love. The Legend of Legacy comes so close to being a compelling role-playing game, but it just doesn't do enough to earn the amount of patience it requires of players, let alone reward it. This may be a story about a treasure hunt, but it certainly is no treasure. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Review: Legend of Legacy photo
Lost in the woods
Juan Ponce de León's hunt for the Fountain of Youth is a legend far more emblematic of many adventures than most depicted in media. The conquistador committed the lion's share of his days to exploring the New Worl...

Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir photo
Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir

The new Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir trailer will melt your eyeballs with how pretty it is


Prettier than Trine 2? Just maybe
Oct 23
// Joe Parlock
Just in case you missed it, Atlus announced Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir a few months ago. A full HD remake of its popular (and beautiful) action JRPG, Leifthrasir will also feature some tweaks to the combat system, and making s...
SMT IV Final photo
SMT IV Final

First glance at Shin Megami Tensei IV Final


Ready to kill the gods?
Oct 11
// Kyle MacGregor
Well, here it is: Shin Megami Tensei IV Final in action. Earlier today during a NicoNico presentation, Atlus shared the first footage of its recently announced follow-up to Shin Megami Tensei IV. Set in a dystopian Tokyo in ...
Genei Ibun Roku X FE photo
Genei Ibun Roku X FE

Oh yeah, Shin Megami Tensei X Fire Emblem exists


New story trailer
Oct 07
// Chris Carter
I don't forget about major releases often, but I totally forgot Genei Ibun Roku X FE (yep, that's the official title) is a thing. Originally known as Shin Megami Tensei x Fire Emblem, which was thought to be a tradi...
SMT IV Final photo
SMT IV Final

Shin Megami Tensei IV Final isn't a repeat


Don't be fooled by the name
Oct 05
// Jordan Devore
Atlus has been building to something Shin Megami Tensei related with a countdown. Thanks to Famitsu, we now know it's a new 3DS game, not rehash, called Shin Megami Tensei IV Final. It's expected to release February 10, 2016 ...
Atlus photo
Atlus

Atlus teases something Shin Megami Tensei IV related


'15,000 tweets'
Oct 05
// Chris Carter
Right now on the official Shin Megami Tensei IV site, Atlus is running a social media campaign to unlock some sort of special announcement. In short, if the game gets 15,000 retweets, we'll find out what it is. If you cl...
Odin Sphere photo
Odin Sphere

Can I just...have Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir now?


Check out the Gwendolyn character vid
Oct 02
// Chris Carter
I had the chance to check out Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir at TGS recently, and man was it fantastic. The art style absolutely holds up, and the framerate issues of the original (one of the only real problems) were complete...

Review: Persona 4: Dancing All Night

Sep 29 // Kyle MacGregor
Persona 4: Dancing All Night (PS Vita)Developer: Atlus Publisher: AtlusReleased: September 29, 2015MSRP: $49.99 Taking place shortly after the events of Persona 4, Dancing All Night opens with Rise Kujikawa and a couple members of the gang in a dance studio. The former idol is mounting a comeback and has enlisted her friends as backup dancers to perform at a large music festival. Of course, things quickly go awry. A cursed Internet video has droves of people falling into comas, and to top it all off, members of Kanamin Kitchen, the pop group headed by Rise's frenemy Kanami Mashita, have gone missing. We soon find out the women have been transported to an alternate dimension called the Midnight Stage, where a mysterious voice and hordes of Shadows hold them hostage. Kanamin Kitchen's captors prey on idols' identity crises and try to make them fall in line with the image of what people think believe are, or want them to be, rather than wage any sort of painful personal struggle. The Investigation Team naturally comes to the rescue, except in this world they can't use their Personas to fight. The only way to beat back the Shadows and save Rise and Kanami's friends is to dance. It's a contrived plot device to shoehorn in rhythmic gameplay based on Sega's Hatsune Miku: Project Diva series, but honestly, who cares when the end result is a damn good time?  [embed]311909:60472:0[/embed] The mechanics at work here are nothing revolutionary. Notes appear in the center of a circle and fly outward toward six zones on circle's perimeter in formations based on music. Players are tasked with keeping the beat, the success or failure of which will determine things like high scores, whether new levels are unlocked, and earn in-game currency for purchasing items and costumes. Dancing All Night functions perfectly, and its three main difficulty settings all feel appropriately challenging. Regardless of which you choose, a poor performance will result in a quick hook, though a mediocre one may allow you to complete a level without passing. This can be a powerful motivator, and definitely kept me coming back to some of the tougher stages. On top of the standard fare, there's also an even harder (hidden) difficulty setting awaiting dedicated players. So good luck with that! Aside from the joy of watching familiar faces like Teddie and Chie cavort around in ridiculous outfits, what makes Dancing All Night a blast is the music itself. One of my favorite aspects of the Persona series is composer Shoji Meguro's handiwork, which is obviously thrust into the spotlight this time around. After completing both the story and free dance modes (plus redeeming some downloadable content) I've unlocked 36 songs, spanning everything from original Persona 4 tracks to spin-off theme songs and even a live performance. However, while that may conceptually seem like a decent-sized selection, it doesn't always feel that way. Half of the soundtrack is padded out with remixes that may or may not resonate with players. While I absolutely loved many of them, there are others I will seldom play again. I found it difficult at times to appreciate versions of songs I've adored for years, only to have some DJ somewhere strip the track of nearly all its personality and transform it into something else entirely. Dancing All Night's uneven score wasn't the only facet of the experience that wasn't as compelling as it could have been. The story is somewhat plodding at times and suffers from repetition, following multiple groups that tread similar ground for most of the game. While there are some pensive themes at work, endearing new characters, and a dramatic finale once the narrative threads begin to converge, the plot doesn't quite live up to its source material -- which is probably expected, given how phenomenal that is. This fusion of visual novel of rhythm game isn't exactly perfect, but speaking as someone who loves Persona (and Shoji Meguro's work in particular), I really enjoyed my time with this one. It might be pure fan service, but sometimes maybe that's enough. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher. Several DLC tracks were also provided by the publisher. ]
Review: P4D photo
Your prize cow
Persona 4 was a story about acceptance. We all have a dark side, some aspect of our personality we dislike about ourselves, something we choose to repress and hide away from the rest of the world. This isn't the healthiest pr...


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