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Assassins Creed

AC Rogue PC date photo
AC Rogue PC date

Assassin's Creed Rogue sneaks over to PC on March 10


Stabs a thing or two along the way
Feb 05
// Brett Makedonski
For more than three months, Assassin's Creed Rogue has been an exclusive to legacy consoles. That'll change on March 10, as the PC version finally has a release date that's set in stone. Strangely, the word doesn't come...

Assassin's Creed fans' best guesses for Victory in painstaking detail

Jan 22 // Brett Makedonski
England's Victorian era was designated by the entirety of Queen Victoria's lifespan. That's 1837-1901 A.D. Not exactly a short period of time. However, some fine attention to detail has possibly narrowed down the time-frame that Victory will take place during.  We have deduced that the majority, if not all, of the game will take place from 1878 onwards. This is due to the the fact that: 1. The construction on Big Ben was completed in 1858.2. Electric street lighting in London began in 1878, as seen in the train station and on the street. But there are other things that Alpha (a forum member) has noticed that would lead one to believe the game is set further in time. An ad can be seen for "Havelock Tobacco" in the last screen from Kotaku, among many others. We have traced this product to being sold in 1891, but these are minor details. Although, 1891 easily fits into the time frame. Now that we have a smaller time period nailed down, let's take a look at some of the monuments that'll surely be included. Ubisoft does love to build faithful recreations of landmarks, after all. This is Saint Margaret's. The building Sam (half the users have settled on "Samuel Fey" as the protagonist's name; the other half is outraged by this unfounded designation) is seen sitting on in the first screen. The placement is very accurate and through my research on Google Earth, and heavy analyzation of the screen, I am sure that they are the same place. You can also see a Google Earth pic of Westminster Abbey in the last pic. If you are unfamiliar with London, you may be surprised to find that it and the Notre Dame are very similar. Next up is Saint Paul's Cathedral. It is seen rising highly above the other buildings, so much so that I don't see how the scale is 100% accurate. Buckingham Palace: this London residence and principal workplace of the monarchy of the United Kingdom was built in 1703 but expanded in the 19th century. This magnificent palace is right across the street from Sam's viewpoint in the first pic (you can probably see it from there) so it is very likely that this will be in the game. Fun fact: Wolve's ancestors helped build the palace. Lastly is the train station seen. This has been confirmed to be the Charing Cross Railway Station, because of it's location on the horizon in screenshot #1 and the distance between the two. [embed]286537:56985:0[/embed] About here, some users went into incredible detail about the various ads that appear in the game (like Foster's Beer). Seriously, it's amazing how deep down the rabbit hole they go. None of it does much apart from further cementing the circa 1891 setting and again affirm that Ubisoft does a pretty great job with authenticity as far as things like that go. I guess a series about history should get the "history" part down. Anyway, one person gave the boldest of predictions. It was my absolute favorite. It takes a very critical eye to even venture this sort of crazy thought. there are going to be hats Sadly, this present-day Nostradamus was largely ignored. The Assassin's Creed forums don't know a good thing when they see it. Instead, they turned their attention to some of the more notable figures we might meet in Victory. A decent-sized list included: Isambard Kingdom Brunel: A civil engineer of the Victorian Era. He also built the Great Western Railway from Bristol to London. Known to have developed powerful steam ships. Sir Titus Salt: A successful businessman that unlike other buisnessman, felt a general concern for the workforce. John Stuart Mill: An utilitarian philosopher and supporter of radical / liberal politics and the emancipation of women. Benjamin Disraeli: British prime minister and personal friend of Queen Victoria herself. Charles Darwin: English naturalist; His published theory of Evolution was one of the greatest changes of the Victorian period. George Stephenson: Father of the railways; He was known for making the first railways that changed the Victorian society and their means of travel. Michael Faraday: A scientist who helped electricity become more practical in the Victorian Era. But, later, someone else chimed in with this golden nugget. The new flamboyant De Sade-like character will be Oscar Wilde, no doubt about that. Right time and place. Brilliant, and sure to please subscribers of r/gonewilde. Yet another talking point were the social aspects. As some users pointed out, the era was rife with class division and terrible working and living conditions. One person mentioned that the streets were flooded with sewage (cue comments saying "Perfect. Assassin's Creed is just wading through shit!" Beat you to it, jokesters.) There's also the theme of child labor and the general poor treatment of kids. Another user weighed in hoping there'd be the option to kill kids. It got pretty grim. Luckily, the tension was broken up by this earnest request: I wanna ride a bicycle across London. So do I, Namikaze_17. So do I. Circling back around to the Assassin's Creed-centric bits of speculation, someone wanted to know how the First Civilization elements could be incorporated into Victory. One response had a few likely answers. It is difficult to predict which areas will be related to the first civ. For example, in AC3 it was a nameless cave, and in Dead Kings it was the catacombs of Saint Denis. But I can make a few guesses. If we are going off of underground places, then it could be the London Bridge catacombs, or maybe an offshoot from a deep underground railway tunnel. Both of these are mysterious and secluded places. I was trying to think of places of power and although it's not in London, Stonehenge is very mysterious and has big potential for AC to put its historical "spin" on it. Who knows what kind of crazy ideas the writers may come up with. Of course, there was the requisite person trying to bring everyone down: My speculation: The game will be buggy. The game will be rushed. The modern story will be almost non-existent. People will still buy it. That was not met with kind replies. And then there was the guy that put the cart way ahead of the horse. So what do you think the DLC will be? Slow your roll, pal. We can't even agree on this guy's name yet. We'll tackle the DLC next week. AC Victory Speculation Thread [Assassin's Creed forums]
AC predictions photo
All before the game's even announced
There's a normal cycle of news for finding out about upcoming videogames. After a tightly-controlled reveal, details will trickle out slowly -- just enough at a time to barely placate prospective players, their longing for th...

Review: Assassin's Creed Unity: Dead Kings

Jan 15 // Brett Makedonski
Assassin's Creed Unity: Dead Kings (PC, PS4, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Ubisoft MontpellierPublisher: UbisoftReleased: January 13, 2015MSRP: Free Dead Kings eschews Unity's crowded Paris in favor of the relatively quaint Franciade (present-day St. Denise). It's there that Arno longs for passage to Cairo, but one last task awaits him. He has the wealth of kings to find, and it's wrapped up in layer after layer of mystery. It's the sort of treasured prize that turns men mad and converts former allies into evil, no-good-doers (as confusing and not elaborated upon as that is). Actually, that's the bulk of what Dead Kings does wrong: it weakly strings together plot points that might be okay on their own, but are cohesively unconvincing. There's the greed of mankind constantly trying to one-up one another to be the first to take sole possession of the coveted, secret treasure. There's a supernatural element wherein spirits guide Arno along the way, if he can solve their rudimentary puzzles. And, there's a child sidekick that tries taking the entire operation down from the outside, whom Arno reluctantly teams up with. Not that all of this is outside the realm of possibility for Assassin's Creed; it's just that it doesn't quite work in this instance. Really, it smacks of a love letter to Raiders of the Lost Ark more than anything else. One setting in particular evokes memories of the Spielberg classic if you're willing to trade snakes for rats. [embed]286101:56870:0[/embed] That isn't to say that Dead Kings doesn't feel like an Assassin's Creed game; it very much does. That's wildly evident by the sheer amount of content in the add-on (especially considering how much of it consists of menial tasks). The six main missions are a sizable chunk, and the rest mostly serves as the filler that has become synonymous with Ubisoft open-world games (for better and for worse). Despite Franciade boasting a respectable three outdoor regions, it's the underground interiors that are highlighted for a change. They feel otherworldly in a sense -- a foray through dimly lit, maze-like, narrow passages when we're used to anything but. It's not at all a stretch to say that these spaces double Dead Kings' playspace from three to six different areas -- two halves that are polar opposites from one another. In these tunnels, packs of explorative scavengers roam with intent to loot -- ravaging caves, tombs, and human remains in pursuit of wealth. While their numbers are strong, Dead Kings mercifully grants an out for almost every combat situation. Each group has a leader, and once he's dead, his followers quickly surrender rather than suffering the same fate. Essentially, this means that a well-timed assassination maneuver or a crafty projectile blade to the head disposes of a half dozen men instead of just one. It may seem like a small example, but it kind of acts as a knowing nod from Ubisoft that perhaps the tedium of the Assassin's Creed rubric is in need of some sort of shake-up. Maybe it's not ready to fully relent, but at least it allows clever assassins to work smarter, not harder. That potential revelation extends to the gameplay in that the six campaign sections possibly serve as the best sample platter of Assassin's Creed missions in recent memory. Interchanged with relative frequency, Dead Kings offers stealth (though not required), combat sequences, environmental puzzles, and exploration-based platforming challenges, all in the few hours that it has to work with. Unfortunately missing are elaborate assassinations (hands-down, the best part of Unity), but nevertheless, this add-on should nicely placate the impatient franchise fan that's easily bored with the "same old, same old" despite the fact that it's still kind of exactly that. For all the directional changes that Ubisoft took with Dead Kings, the most confounding decision is that the add-on isn't really comfortably positioned for any one audience. Those that have completed Unity will find it a bit under-challenging, as end-game gear will usually quickly eliminate the mid-level opposition. However, Dead Kings takes place after Unity ends, meaning that anyone that's statistically aligned with the enemies will have to play the game out of order. All in all, Dead Kings adds up to a package that's somewhat schizophrenic in nature. At times, it seems like both the story and the gameplay aren't quite sure where they want to go. Even more surprising, it kind of works. Anyone that knows Assassin's Creed will feel an innate familiarity with Dead Kings and maybe even a bit of excitement (particularly the last section, which conjures memories of a classic series moment). However, there's an air of freshness about it that works in some ways and falls flat in others. Dead Kings isn't likely to reignite anyone's love for Assassin's Creed, but it certainly won't extinguish any existing flames, either. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided for free to the public as apology DLC.]
AC DLC review photo
What's old is new again... kind of
If our time spent wandering the Parisian streets in Assassin's Creed Unity has taught us anything, it's that Arno Dorian is a self-serving man. Almost all of his actions, whether aligned with the cause of the Brotherhood or n...

Writers Guild Award photo
Writers Guild Award

Big names dominate Writers Guild Award nominations


Two Assassin's Creeds, Alien, and The Last of Us DLC
Jan 13
// Brett Makedonski
Anyone that's of the belief that mainstream videogames are often devoid of great writing will need to look somewhere other than the Writers Guild of America for vindication. The organization's nominees for Outstanding Achieve...
AC Unity DLC photo
AC Unity DLC

A new trailer commemorates the release of Assassin's Creed Unity's free DLC


Available now
Jan 13
// Brett Makedonski
Do you believe in ghosts? I'm not sure Arno does, but who wouldn't temporarily suspend their disbelief for "ancient artifacts and lost fortunes?" "Sure, the spirits of dead kings are everywhere. Whatever. Big money, big mone...
Mega Bloks photo
Mega Bloks

These Assassin's Creed Mega Bloks were 'designed with adult collectors in mind'


Hey, kids, wanna stab?
Jan 08
// Jordan Devore
Brett told us about the Assassin's Creed Mega Bloks only to totally leave us hanging now that the toys are viewable online. Never did trust that guy. Makedonski? Obviously a phony last name. Anyway, yes, Ubisoft has posted im...
Assassin's Creed movie photo
Assassin's Creed movie

The Assassin's Creed movie is probably totally, definitely, absolutely releasing in 2016


Uh huh...
Jan 06
// Brett Makedonski
Just like the legendary Morrissey, stop me if you think you've heard this one before: a silver screen adaption of a popular videogame has a definite (albeit far off) release date. This time, it's Assassin's Creed, and it's to...
AC Unity photo
AC Unity

Assassin's Creed Unity's free DLC is a week away, and it looks too spooky


Human remains will do that
Jan 06
// Brett Makedonski
Assassin's Creed Unity was mostly an adventure that took place on the crowded Parisian streets, all jam-packed with people. The game's first add-on looks to be similarly populated -- not by lively dissenters, but by the...
More Amazon deals photo
More Amazon deals

A really cheap bundle of Assassin's Creed games highlights some decent Amazon deals


And a few other noteworthy items
Jan 05
// Brett Makedonski
Amazon must've had a bunch of download cards left over following Microsoft's holiday promotion featuring a reduced Xbox One bundle. Apart from several unsold Assassin's Creed packaged consoles, how else could you ex...
Panache photo
Panache

Assassin's Creed creative director has a new game


This sounds pretty familiar
Dec 19
// Laura Kate Dale
Patrice Désilets is a man whose name you may not know, but whose work you probably do. Patrice used to be the creative director on the Assassin's Creed series, before Ubisoft kicked him to the curb and held on to the r...
AC Unity photo
AC Unity

Come get your free game, Assassin's Creed Unity season pass owners


It's really easy
Dec 18
// Brett Makedonski
Ubisoft's offer for a free game for Assassin's Creed Unity season pass owners is now live, and it's extremely simple. In fact, it only took a few clicks before I was the proud new owner of Far Cry 4. Here's how to do it....
Xbox One contest photo
Merry Christmas, ya filthy animals
[Update: Contest over! Winner is Sam Butler1!] Our friends at Microsoft have bestowed upon us an Xbox One Assassin's Creed Unity bundle to give away to one lucky Dtoider! Included in the bundle is a standard Xbox One console ...

Unity patch photo
Unity patch

The latest Assassin's Creed Unity patch is a meager, tiny 40GB on Xbox One


Luckily, there's a work-around
Dec 17
// Brett Makedonski
The fourth Assassin's Creed Unity patch released yesterday, and Xbox One users found that it was substantially larger than advertised. The update, which was meant to be 6.7GB, clocks in at 40GB on the Microsoft console. ...
Free game photo
Free game

Assassin's Creed Unity season pass owners' free game is coming this week


Six to choose from
Dec 15
// Brett Makedonski
As an attempt to make amends for the flubbed Assassin's Creed Unity launch, Ubisoft announced last month that it'd grant the Dead Kings story add-on for free to all Unity players. This put out the season p...

The next Assassin's Creed reportedly takes place in Victorian London

Dec 02 // Brett Makedonski
Ubisoft responded to our inquiry for comment with a semi-confirmation of the title's legitimacy. The publisher's statement in full to Destructoid is: "It is always unfortunate when internal assets, not intended for public consumption, are leaked. And, while we certainly welcome anticipation for all of our upcoming titles, we're disappointed for our fans, and our development team, that this conceptual asset is now public. The team in our Quebec studio has been hard at work on the particular game in question for the past few years, and we're excited to officially unveil what the studio has been working on at a later date. In the meantime, our number one priority is enhancing the experience of Assassin's Creed Unity for players." In his piece on Kotaku, Jason Schreier states that he's seen a seven-minute "target gameplay" video that looks polished enough to be an E3 demonstration. It highlights some firsts for the series such as fighting on top of moving vehicles, and a grappling hook for speedy traversal. It also looks to have some new UI features, like the interface blending into gameplay -- something that was shown to us at an E3 demo of Unity, but never made it into the final game. We'll have to wait for Ubisoft's official reveal of this project, but this seems like a legitimate look. Some may be burned out on the annual iterations of the Assassin's Creed franchise, and that's perfectly understandable. Those who aren't can prepare for anarchy in the UK. Next Year's Big Assassin's Creed Is Set In Victorian London [Kotaku]
Next Assassin's Creed photo
That was quick
The Assassin's Creed franchise goes through a little routine each spring where someone leaks information about the next installment in the series before Ubisoft can properly make the announcement. Tradition's true to for...

Ubisoft removes Assassin's Creed Unity Season Pass from the marketplace

Nov 26 // Alessandro Fillari
"The launch of Assassin's Creed Unity was a highly-anticipated moment for me and for our development teams around the world who dedicated a tremendous amount of energy, passion and skill to the game's creation," said Mallat. "For us, it was the culmination of years of work on new technologies, the development of multiple innovations -- including an all-new game engine -- and an evolution of the Assassin's Creed franchise's core pillars. More importantly, we know that it was a highly-anticipated moment for many of you as well, as you looked forward to taking part in the first truly next generation Assassin's Creed game." As we all know, the state of Unity was in shambles, causing many game-breaking and unintentionally humorous bugs. With the recent patches having repaired the game, the publisher recognizes that there is still more work to be done. "We've been working hard to fix the problems players are reporting, and the patches we have released so far have resolved many of them," said the CEO. "Today, we're releasing our third patch, which fixes a variety of specific issues related to the game’s stability and performance, matchmaking and connectivity, gameplay and menus." This sort of move is rather unprecedented for a major publisher. With everything going on with Unity over the last month, we can all assume this decision was not made lightly. An Update on Assassin's Creed Unity from Yannis Mallat [Ubisoft]
AC Unity DLC update photo
The publisher seeks to regain trust by offering free content
Earlier this morning, several users on NeoGAF noticed that Steam, PlayStation Network, and other online stores had removed all pages for the Assassin's Creed Unity Season Pass, with German games site GamersGlobal claiming tha...

Assassin's Creed photo
Assassin's Creed

Ubisoft aims to draw kids into the Assassin's Creed brand


Kill 'em with cuteness
Nov 21
// Brett Makedonski
Ubisoft owns one of the most popular videogame properties in Assassin's Creed, but that's not stopping it from trying to extend the series' appeal to an audience that some might frown upon -- children. That's the publisher's ...
Assassin's Creed photo
"Oi, Guv! Did you nick my Vichyssoise?!"
Max and I are still working our way through the first hour of Assassin's Creed: Unity. I really like re-watching this part of our playthrough because every time I do, I see a new NPC twitching or jostling around. Also, we made jokes about reality television and stuff. 

Assassin's Creed Unity photo
Assassin's Creed Unity

Ubisoft outlines the bugs it's killing with third Assassin's Creed Unity patch


'Won't solve every problem, but we're expecting that it will dramatically improve your experience'
Nov 17
// Brett Makedonski
Less than a week after release, Ubisoft's already planning and detailing the third of Assassin's Creed Unity's patches. This update is said to be "larger in scope" than the previous patches, and will focus on several problema...
Cheap Xbox One photo
Cheap Xbox One

Get an Xbox One online, cheaper than Black Friday prices


Right now, from home, without murder and human contact
Nov 16
// Steven Hansen
Save for gift cards on top, there is parity among Xbox One options on "Black Friday," which actually starts Thursday. Toys 'R' Us, Walmart, Best Buy, Target. It's $330 for an Xbox One with the two new Assassin's Creed ga...
Assassin's Creed photo
What if AssCreed existed in a world were the developers could finish it
Max and I were fighting to stay awake through the beginning of Assassin's Creed Unity, and Max posited a theory that many Ubisoft published games exist in the same universe. Then we saw a fancy boy and a pig and at least had something to joke about for a while.

Assassin's Creed photo
From boring to broken in just 10 minutes
Oh boy... Max and I jumped into Assassin's Creed Unity. Max started out cautiously excited at what this new iteration might bring, while I have never been at all interested in the series. It's not long before both of our sentiments landed at the same astonished disappointment. Trust me, it only gets uglier from here.

Review: Assassin's Creed Rogue

Nov 13 // Brett Makedonski
Assassin's Creed Rogue (PlayStation 3, PC, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: Ubisoft SofiaPublisher: UbisoftRelease: November 11, 2014 (PC in 2015)MSRP: $59.99 While it's loathsome to reference other games for detail in a review, it's near impossible not to in the case of Assassin's Creed Rogue. This is nothing more than a patchwork quilt of Black Flag's systems (right down to the interface and fonts) with other Assassin's Creed ideas sprinkled in liberally. It plays like a greatest hits album of the franchise, and while some might welcome that, it's difficult to heartily applaud the effort. An argument could be made that outlining Rogue's gameplay would be best served be republishing an original Black Flag review. It's nearly identical, after all. Heavy emphasis on sailing, counter-based combat, a lot of open sea naval combat, many small island or coastal locations to explore -- it's all there. Even most of the places feel eerily similar to those in Black Flag, just re-skinned with a bit of snow to suit the Northeastern setting. When it isn't copping Black Flag's style, Rogue's borrowing concepts from other Assassin's Creed games before it. Remember the reparation project introduced in Assassin's Creed II? Renovating various buildings around the three major locales is the means of earning passive income in Rogue. How about the task of liberating small Borgia-controlled areas in Brotherhood? That's here too, as "gangs" occupy various sections of the world. They're all present, like a family reunion made up of only the relatives that you don't mind. [embed]283665:56274:0[/embed] This isn't inherently a bad thing, just uninspiring. Black Flag was an enjoyable title, one that reversed course from the often dull Assassin's Creed III. But, would we heap praise upon Leonardo da Vinci if he painted a second Mona Lisa a year later but added a bush behind her? Rogue is derivative of the series' past works to a discouraging extent, and that's saying something given the culture of annual releases in the videogame industry. The little that Rogue does to innovate mostly falls flat and is inconsequential. A bit more than a third of the way through, the player's given access to a grenade launcher -- a device that needs to be used exactly once, and that's in the mission immediately following its introduction. The grenade launcher can be used to brute through some doors, but that's probably ill-advised when compared to the more subtle approach of lockpicking -- a feat that's accomplished by simply holding down a button. It's really too bad because the juxtaposition between the thought put into the narrative and the effort put into the gameplay is glaringly obvious. The presentation of protagonist Shay Patrick Cormac is one of the best in Assassin's Creed history, telling the tale of a man keenly aware and critical of his own actions, not just simply fighting for his side because it's "his side." Rogue's hook is that it's the first game in the franchise to put the player in Templar robes (apart from a short stint in Assassin's Creed III), and it can, at times, wonderfully drive home that there are two sides to any story. Shay leaves the Assassin brotherhood after embarking on a mission that went horribly awry and did untold destruction upon a city's populace. Believing that his superiors knew this would happen, Shay turns his back and fights for a more noble cause -- humanity. Finding that his interests align with those of the Templars, he joins their corner to prevent the Assassins from accomplishing their will and causing even more unnecessary death (an intention that's starkly dissonant from his actions when he sticks his blade in hundreds of soldiers that had the audacity to live in a different country, but I digress). What lends Shay such a sympathetic demeanor is that his story is properly established. It's not until several hours into Rogue that the major event takes place that gives way to his betrayal. In the time leading up to that, the audience is given a glimpse at who Shay is. He's more than just a killing machine. He's playful at times, but professional when he needs to be. Always though, Shay's a good-natured fellow, even if this means being too trusting of others. When Shay eventually turns his back on the Assassins, it doesn't at all feel like an unnatural transition from the shoes that Ubisoft's had us walking in for the six previous installments. Rather, it gives pause; it lets us reflect. Maybe the Templars aren't an entirely evil organization, and maybe the Assassins aren't so altruistic with their ways. Maybe things aren't as black and white as they've always seemed. There are certainly shades of grey, and Rogue expertly reminds us that that every story has another point of view. Surprisingly, this is nowhere more apparent than in the modern setting. As in Black Flag, the out-of-Animus actions take place inside Abstergo Entertainment -- a division of Templar-run Abstergo Industries and a cheeky meta nod at Ubisoft. The higher-ups are hellbent on extracting Shay's memories because they want to shove his side-switch in the Assassin's faces. Along the way, there's plenty of lore to rediscover. As menial tasks are prescribed, a wealth of information is made available to those willing to find it. By hacking -- erm, "repairing" -- computers through a never-changing mini-game, files are unlocked that profile notable Templars from past installments, painting them in a light that's far more redeeming than what was learned through the eyes of the Assassins. The "Inspiration" videos are especially rewarding, but there are other interesting files that cover the past, present, and future of Abstergo and Templar involvement. Hiding in one of these tablet entries is an aggressive wink at the root of the problem with Assassin's Creed Rogue. "...While I want to recycle assets to save money, the experience has to be totally fresh," reads an Abstergo note. Ubisoft's push to release two Assassin's Creed titles on the same day significantly hampered the potential of the last-gen release -- a borderline travesty given all that the protagonist and narrative do to shake-up the tried and true approach. Those who yearn for a return to Black Flag's sandbox will take comfort knowing this is "more of the same," as the clichéd review expression goes. But, Rogue's systems do nothing to move Assassin's Creed forward, leaving it fittingly stuck in the past like the last-generation consoles it graces. Anyone who expects more will be disappointed. Anyone who just wants another open-world adventure replete with sailing, exploration, and killing might find comfort in its familiar ways. The reception to Assassin's Creed Rogue's gameplay systems and mechanics will likely vary and mirror the sentiment that the game's narrative and tonal direction pride itself upon. It's all just a matter of perspective.
AC Rogue review photo
A matter of perspective
Ever since its 2007 debut, the Assassin's Creed franchise has been presented as a one-sided affair. Chronicling the persistent struggle between the Assassins and the Templars, Ubisoft has always framed the story casting ...

Ubisoft photo
Ubisoft

Ubisoft is well aware of Assassin's Creed Unity issues


Fixes are on the way
Nov 13
// Kyle MacGregor
Assassin's Creed Unity is a bit of a train wreck at the moment. The Parisian playground is plagued with a myriad of glitches, most of which aren't as fun or hilarious as the nightmare fuel pictured above. Understandably, many...
Fun with glitches photo
Fun with glitches

Let's watch Assassin's Creed Unity glitch out to the tune of 'Barbie Girl'


That's our Assassin's Creed
Nov 12
// Jordan Devore
Kyle sent me this compilation of Assassin's Creed Unity glitches and, six minutes later, I'm calling it: I've spent more time watching these games mess up than I have playing them. When they screw up, they tend to do so spectacularly. Best glitch happens at 4:26.
Assassin's Creed Unity photo
Assassin's Creed Unity

Assassin's Creed Unity really nails those next-gen glitches


I mean 'current-gen'
Nov 11
// Brett Makedonski
Or, maybe this guy's not a glitch. Maybe he's an assassin sent with a darker purpose. Maybe he's supposed to infiltrate your nightmares and make sure you never sleep soundly again. Kudos to you, Assassin Brotherhood; you've found a way to inflict a punishment more terrifying than death.

Review: Assassin's Creed Unity

Nov 11 // Chris Carter
Assassin's Creed Unity (PC, PS4, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Ubisoft MontrealPublisher: UbisoftRelease:  November 11, 2014MSRP: $59.99 Unity once again adapts entirely to an iconic period in world history: the French Revolution of the 18th century. Without delay you're reintroduced to the timeless battle of the Templars and Assassins, but this time, the former are on the defensive after a witch hunt from the ruling class. It's at this tenuous time that you'll meet Arno Dorian, the hero of the tale. Much like Ezio, Arno's father is killed right at the start, which leads him to the discovery of a conspiracy involving the two major groups, as well as the awakening of his true power as an assassin. Although his story and subsequent actions are mostly predictable, I was on board with Arno from the get-go. He's not quite as memorable as Ezio or as dashing as Edward, but he's likable, and believable in terms of how the team ties him into the narrative. Ubisoft is clearly getting better at drawing emotional performances out of its subjects, and the current-gen visuals help a lot of the characters come to life like never before -- even if what they're actually doing isn't all that exciting. About an hour into the game, you'll get to the actual revolution, and things kick off nicely. Although Ubisoft once again nails the time period, mirroring events with its own signature faction spin, it doesn't have as much charm as Black Flag did. Gone are the vast open-sea sections, the memorable sea shanties, and the sense that at every turn, some new bit of buried treasure or fortress may be there for the taking. Paris is a huge playground, though -- perhaps one of the biggest single-setting areas so far in the series. As long as you don't mind that many areas look similar to one another (there's not enough district variation as in other Assassin's Creed games), there's quite a bit of ground to cover here. The modern half of the story -- or should I say, the modern fraction -- is a lot less prevalent this time around. At the start you're billed as yet another employee of Abstergo Entertainment, the modern-day incarnation of the Templar order, and every three to four hours you'll be contacted by Desmond's crew for a quick briefing on what's going on in the current age as you're recruited into the Assassin order. It's basically more "Templars are bad, mmkay" dialog, and you'll quickly be ported back into Arno's tale after the short expositions. [embed]283448:56272:0[/embed] In fact, everything outside of the 18th-century Arno core is streamlined. There are only three bits of gameplay where you aren't exploring the revolution, which deal with three specific periods in time throughout France's history: the 1800s, Nazi-occupied Paris, and the Middle Ages. These sections are, for a lack of a better word, unified (and roughly 15 minutes long each), and for those of you who aren't fans of the overarching modern-day story, you'll be pleased to know that it's almost non-existent. If you dig it, you may want to look elsewhere to get your fix. I'm not a huge fan of the modern stuff, but I could have stood for a little more of it, much in the vein of Black Flag. Gameplay is relatively the same, with the completely new addition to free run "up or down" by holding the run trigger and a specific button. It's mostly the same as before with a couple of extra button taps to get used to, but the movement system thankfully prevents more accidents than in previous games; you'll rarely jump off cliffs to your doom now because you accidentally jimmied a direction in a way your character didn't like. The animations are also smoother, and I specifically noticed a lot more variation with Arno's parkouring like extra spin moves and tumbles, which were a neat surprise. Unity also adds a more RPG-like element to the game -- the ability to "level up" by doing more missions, gaining new powers in the process. These are things like more health, better lockpicking skills, abilities like restoring your ammo at will, and gaining new close-combat moves. I like this addition since it allows you to build your character the way you want from the start without getting into the minutiae of skill points or anything in-depth. You earn points by doing random actions out in the wild, which encourages you to start tussles and actively level-up. In terms of gear, everything is more streamlined this time around, and you won't be fumbling around gigantic menus to access different variations of smoke bombs. Instead, Ubisoft kept things simple with a few flashy pieces of gear, a sidearm, and the new Phantom Blade -- which is a fancy way of saying "powerful projectile" -- that can be used for long-range assassinations. Like the story, it's not elaborate or new, but it gets the job done and there's enough tools to have fun in multiple situations. Even better, you can fully customize Arno by purchasing new clothes, uniforms, and weapons all from a simple menu. It's a welcome addition, especially since you can switch up Arno's threads right from the start, changing his new blue look to the iconic white setup. There's over 100 different outfit combinations, including classic costumes with a few unlock requirements. The biggest upgrade in Unity has to be the bigger crowds as a result of the current-gen push, and it's noticeable from the start. It's unreal to see a couple hundred citizens rage in what feels like a real revolution, and it feels like a real struggle at points, which is unique to Unity. The draw distance is also greatly improved. You can see the Parisian countryside in the background at nearly all times. Indoor settings are also a sight to behold, as my jaw actually dropped after seeing the interior of the Notre-Dame Cathedral for the first time. Unfortunately, Ubisoft seems to have had some issues adapting the series to current-gen systems; I encountered a number of nasty glitches on the Xbox One. For starters, the most common ones were constantly repeating dialog during key story parts, issues with the close-combat animations, some freezing while climbing tall structures, and falling through the floor during the start of certain missions. Since Unity offers checkpoints constantly it wasn't really a game-breaking affair, but I encountered at least one small glitch every two missions or so. Enough for the technical issues to get annoying. The actual mission types don't stray too far from the classic formula, but there are occasionally more open-ended events that are less structured. I wouldn't say they're necessarily "organic" as described by the developer, since they just add a few optional objectives that make the mission slightly easier, but they're a nice way to jazz up assassination missions, as they make you think of ways to solve a problem other than "get to the target and kill him." If you're a completionist, you'll enjoy the murder mystery optional missions, which allow you to gather evidence and accuse citizens of a crime, netting a "first try" bonus if you get it right. The crowds are also more dynamic this time around; there are thieves to tackle and criminals to stop randomly throughout the town, signified by miniature missions that can just pop up on your map. It's not a new idea, but it's nice to see something happen out in the world that helps those mesmerizing crowds seem more life-like. There's also "Paris Stories" to complete (involving iconic figures in French history), the aforementioned three extra time periods to explore in the form of additional obstacle courses, and of course, funny database entries by Shaun the Assassin. Multiplayer this time around is stripped down in favor of a streamlined co-op experience. There's no competitive element in Unity, no second disc to insert or menu option to select -- it's all built into the campaign in one giant mode. It's the same world as the core story, but with certain missions you can use matchmaking or partner up with three friends to tackle them as a team. It's inoffensive at its worst, as there are some exclusive co-op missions you can play that can't be done solo, and it all fits nicely into Unity without feeling forced. I'm fine with the removal of the competitive gametype, because almost every single game since Brotherhood has included it. It's time to try something different, and although co-op didn't set my world on fire, it does have potential that can be better realized down the line. My lack of enthusiasm for the multiplayer is mirrored by my experience with the rest of the game. Unity does take a few extra strides towards advancing the series, but in many ways it feels like a step back from Black Flag. It was fun to roam around Paris looking for trouble and ogle at the power of current-gen consoles, but the game lacks that grand sense of roaming the uncharted seas in Assassin's Creed IV, or even the open-ended feel of the wilderness in Assassin's Creed III. In other words, it struggles to make its own mark on the franchise outside of the new French Revolution setting. If Ubisoft fixes the glitches, Assassin's Creed: Unity will be a much stronger game, even if the ceiling is a bit lower in general. Unity's potential is not as strong as some of the better entries in the series, but it's good enough for existing fans to continue the journey.
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Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death
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