hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

Animals

That's our Gaben photo
That's our Gaben

Gabe Newell will sign your horse mask, and then put it on


See the footage, complete with a Half-Life 3 'reference' and everything
Jan 31
// Jordan Devore
Don't let anyone say that Gabe Newell isn't a man of the people. After speaking to students at The University of Texas at Austin, which is where his quote about Apple being competition for the PC industry in the living room ...
Japan World Cup photo
Japan World Cup

Japonies 2013


A reminder that Japan World Cup is real
Jan 13
// Tony Ponce
So, like, this is nothing new. We briefly brought up Japan World Cup, a weird-ass horse race-betting DVD game, a couple years back. You might not have heard of it. Or, if you are like me, you completely forgot that this is a thing that exists. Consider this a refresher course in "Japan is f*ckin' nuts" 101. [Vinesauce] Studyguy - Japonies 2013 [YouTube]
 photo
TEAM MEOW
Edmund McMillen of Team Meat has just announced that he and Tommy Refenes are hard at work on their follow-up to Super Meat Boy. It's about cats. Mew-Genics was conceived during a game jam session, but the duo felt it had pot...

 photo

Flightless looks quacktastic, shooting for Steam release


You can't go wrong with ducks (and drop-in, drop-out co-op)
Oct 15
// Tony Ponce
Indie developer Nitrome, known for its disgustingly massive selection of free web games, is prepping its first major commercial release, Flightless. It's a fairly basic puzzle-platformer starring a thieving duck who has had ...
 photo

Tokyo Jungle gets four new DLC animals today


Oct 09
// Jordan Devore
As announced on the PlayStation Blog, Tokyo Jungle will be getting four additional playable animals today, and I think there's something here for everyone. Available for download at $0.99 each or bundled together for $2.49 ar...
 photo

More Ecco the Dolphin? Creator is talking with Sega


Sep 24
// Jordan Devore
I know! But before you get your hopes up, let's go through this one step at a time. Game designer Ed Annunziata, the creator of Ecco the Dolphin, tweeted this last week: "Ecco fans, I need you to follow & tweethank @scott...
 photo

Incredible unseen footage of Twelve Tales: Conker 64


Sep 17
// Tony Ponce
Sometimes it's hard to remember that Conker was not always the foul-mouthed drunkard we all know and love. He was supposed to be another kid-friendly mascot in Rare's software stable. He even managed to squeeze out a forgett...

Review: Tokyo Jungle

Sep 13 // Dale North
[embed]234885:45048[/embed] Tokyo Jungle (PlayStation Network)Developer: C.A.M.P, Crispy'sPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: September 25, 2012 MSRP: $14.99 First off, if you don't laugh your ass off at Tokyo Jungle, there's something seriously wrong with you. It's not the deepest or most polished game out there, but it makes up for any faults with ceaseless hilarity. Reading about how you'll first control a cute little Pomeranian pup to go up against other animals is one thing, but actually mashing the button to have the little guy swipe his paw at a roaring lion -- or a massive, chomping alligator -- is another. And when you nail a perfect takedown, where blood spurts from your prey's neck? Uproarious! I've dumped a lot of time into Tokyo Jungle's survival mode this past week, but the strangeness of its setting has yet to wear off for me.  Alligators and lions, you ask? Oh yes, as well as many other animals that you wouldn't expect to find among the highrise buildings of Japan's capital. Domesticated animals like dogs, cats, and rabbits run wild in the streets alongside beasts from the rural outer fringes, like pigs and deer. The really crazy animals, such as hyenas and bears, originate from the city zoo, now out on the loose to find enough prey to live through another day. Survival is key in Tokyo Jungle. The game's primary mode has you selecting an animal and immediately hitting the streets to look for prey to munch on. For every second that you're not eating, a hunger gauge continually decreases. When that gauge is fully depleted, your life bar begins to decrease, bringing you closer to death. It's as simple as kill (and eat) or die. When you finally do die, the game rates you on how long you've managed to stay alive. For the carnivores, learning to hunt is the only thing that will have them seeing another day. Early on, animals will have to track down smaller prey, like birds and rabbits, as anything else would be too dangerous to take on directly. But as the animal eats these smaller prey, it becomes larger and stronger, enabling it to take down bigger beasts and have an even meatier meal. All the while their caloric intake is counted; more food eaten makes for a stronger animal. These animals have both a clawing and biting attack to work with in the jungle. Clawing (square button) will swipe away at an enemy's life bar slowly, and biting (right button) will have it literally going for the jugular with a dash attack. Once dead, and if the coast is clear, the animal can begin devouring its kill, with each bite turning into experience points that can lead to increased levels. Only having two attacks may sound limiting, but it turns out that each animal type requires a slightly different approach. Plus, I never felt like scratching the faces off of cats was anything less than entertaining. Stealth play comes in handy when you have a small animal that is going up against a much larger one -- or worse, a full pack of beasts. All animals can quietly creep in high grass scattered all over the city to try to stay concealed until an attack opportunity arises. Hidden there, a correctly timed press of the bite button has the attacker jumping out and latching onto its prey's neck directly, instantly killing it. At the very top level, thorough patience, it's possible for even a little puppy to take down huge jungle-type creatures. And, as I said before, it's never not funny. Stealth play is the only way to go for the herbivores. Playing as a deer, for example, is much different than playing as a dog. The deer is forced to sneak around and nibble on plant life, working to avoid falling prey to roaming carnivores. It may have speed on its side, but they're always on the move as edible plant life is scarce in this post-apocalyptic world. Herbivores do have attack abilities, but they're more for defense, as a kill will never be a meal for these animals.  All animals can increase their chances of survival by mating. This involves "marking" territory in a given area, finding a compatible mate, taking it back to the nest, and then mounting that mate (Really! The mounting is shown) to make babies. If all goes right, the offspring will take on some of the traits and abilities of the parents, and then travel in a pack to carry on in the world. The pack works together from then on out while hunting and exploring, and should one member die, another immediately takes over. Hopefully, at least one will survive to find its mate to have their own offspring, bringing another generation into the world.  Although there's a lot to take in here, in practice, the gameplay really is as simple as trying to live for as long as possible. While there are equippable items (your dog can wear a cute hat or jacket) to find to improve stats a bit, Tokyo Jungle's survival game really boils down to scrambling to find enough food to last until you find a mate, procreating, and then doing it again. I've had stretches where I've lived through five or six generations and dozens of years, through rain storms, animal revolts, and toxic air outbreaks. But you will eventually die. That's just how it is. Each animal type has a list of challenges to take on to keep things interesting in survival mode. Early challenges have the animal doing simple things, like racking up kills, or marking territory. High-level challenges are more like quests, and have animals working to dominate an area. The top-level quest for the Pomeranian has it going to one district of Tokyo to take out all the cats in an all-out turf war. It gets messy! Completion of these top-level challenges unlocks a new animal to play as in survival mode. Tokyo Jungle's story mode features unlockable chapters (earned in survival mode) where some animals star in their own special tale. They use artwork and text to set up situations with a bit of a backstory, though the stories are pretty silly. Gameplay consists of missions that use survival mode's combat and exploration play, making for bite-sized sessions that aren't too much different than the game's main mode. While these stories can be fun, they don't have the holding power that the survival mode does. While mutilating and devouring the flesh of cute little animals under ruined, famous Japanese landmarks is a riot, there's not much more than this to do in Tokyo Jungle. The control is sufficient, and the hunting action is quite fun, but as soon as the thrill of the hunt wears off, it's really just running around in circles until you eventually die. And, unfortunately, there's not too much of a difference in the way the various animals control, which doesn't help the feeling of repetitiveness. While some may take pleasure in trying to top the leaderboards for their survival skills, I feel that most will quickly tire of this game after putting it through its paces. That said, you should still dive into Tokyo Jungle. While a bit shallow, it's an insane idea done really well. If nothing else, it's worth your cash just to see your fantasy animal match-ups go down. Really, you haven't lived until you've seen a pack of puppies take down an alligator.
 photo

We're not sure what took so long for Tokyo Jungle to be localized (we first played it at the 2010 Tokyo Game Show), but it's finally here and it's every bit as silly and hilarious as we had hoped it would be.   This acti...

 photo

The gun for Cabela's Dangerous Hunts 2013 is absurd


Two heartbeat sensors and infrared. Yep.
Sep 06
// Jordan Devore
"Fearmaster controller? What the hell is that?" I found out, and promptly had to write a post about it. The Top Shot Fearmaster is a gun peripheral for Cabela's Dangerous Hunts 2013, otherwise known as the series with some of...
 photo

Far Cry 3's lead designer explains what turtles are for


Dude, seriously -- look at all the turtles!
Sep 06
// Max Scoville
Hey guys, guess what? There's turtles in Far Cry 3. I know what you're thinking, you're like "Whoa, turtles?" and I'm like, "Yeah dude, I know!" I got to talk to Jamie Keen, the lead designer, at PAX this weekend. I aske...
 photo

Tokyo Jungle coming to North America September 25


Aug 20
// Jim Sterling
Tokyo Jungle, the demented "animal survival" game about a Tokyo chock-full of lions and bears, is destined to hit North America on September 25. What's more, the crazy game is going to be available for the rather pleasant pri...
 photo

Ecco the Dolphin celebrates 20 years of aquatic majesty!


Jul 29
// Tony Ponce
[Header by Ashley Davis] Every other videogame franchise seems to be celebrating a major anniversary lately. However, there's one little series that seems to have slipped everyone's mind. Everyone except Dtoider TheManchild, ...

Review: Bomb Monkey

Jun 27 // Tony Ponce
[embed]230214:44203[/embed] Bomb Monkey (Nintendo eShop)Developer: Renegade KidPublisher: Renegade KidReleased: June 28, 2012MSRP: $4.99 An inexperienced Bomb Monkey will soon discover that his finely placed bombs result in out of control detonations. He may accept this philosophically as a microcosm of life, or learn to control it by noticing that adjacent series of similarly-colored bloks will participate in a chain reaction. The above is an excerpt from Bomb Monkey's digital manual. I'm drawing attention to the manual because, as the first thing new players are likely to inspect, it's pretty damn clever. Instead of a clinical list of the rules, it reads like a warm and inviting career training guide. I always appreciate it when developers apply just as much care and polish to their ancillary materials as they do the games themselves. The manual's lighthearted tone reflects Bomb Monkey's gentle and low-key nature -- despite the gameplay hook of using bombs to blast away "bloks," it's a fairly stress-free experience. There are no arcane strategies to learn or strict regulations to adhere to. You're just a monkey dropping bombs because that's what bomb monkeys do! To play, you hold the 3DS book-style -- as in Hotel Dusk or Rhythm Heaven for the original DS -- and operate your monkey using only the D-pad (or stylus, if you prefer). Move the monkey into position on the tightrope and drop bloks wherever you like. Every few turns, you'll acquire a bomb that can destroy bloks horizontally and vertically in a one-blok radius; destroying a blok will also destroy any like-colored bloks adjacent to it. There are special bloks, too. When strikers are destroyed, they'll clear an entire row or column; strategic placement of strikers can lead to massive chain reactions. There are locked bloks that require two hits to destroy and can interrupt blast chains. Locked bloks can be destroyed instantly by time bombs, with double the blast strength and radius of regular bombs, but which must be dropped before they explode in your face, temporarily stunning you. Finally, by destroying letter orbs to spell out "BOMB," you'll go on a bombing spree for ten seconds. The main game mode is Endless, in which you simply play until the rising ocean of bloks reaches the top. Then there is 3 Minutes, similar to Endless only with a time limit; Rescue, in which you must blast a cage 50 times to free your monkey friend; and Numbers, in which you must clear as many screens as you can by destroying the three numbered orbs in increasing order. But the big surprise is the multiplayer. Both players play on the same machine -- Player 1 uses the D-pad and is assigned the touch screen, while Player 2 uses the four face buttons and is assigned the main screen. You can play Co-op, in which each player has a unique game board but can send gifts like extra bombs to their partner, or Versus, in which large combos will drop garbage bloks on the other board. Simultaneous multiplayer on a single portable device is such a rarity -- the only other title I can think of off the top of my head is WarioWare on GBA. Unless you are attending a major event like PAX or MAGFest, where almost everyone is toting a handheld of some kind, you aren't likely to bump into someone else with a 3DS while walking the street, much less one in possession of the same game as you. Single-device multiplayer is an invitation to anyone in the vicinity to go a few rounds, thus breaking down that barrier preventing handheld gaming from being a shared experience. It's a much, much welcome feature, and I give Renegade Kid tons of praise for incorporating it. Of course, you should be aware by now that Bomb Monkey couldn't possibly play well with any 3D effects. Just as well, because there isn't any 3D functionality whatsoever. There are 3DS games with 3D-less segments, but this is the first one I personally know of that lacks the feature entirely. I'm just glad 3D wasn't shoehorned in. More than that, I'm glad that there is at least one developer out there that understands that you don't have to force unneeded features for the sake of checking off a box. As with Mutant Mudds, Bomb Monkey plays well without necessarily shaking its genre's foundation. Lacking the excessive bloat of modern puzzlers, it echoes the Panel de Pons and Tetrises of the past -- easy to pick up, yet rewarding to those with the patience and perseverance to rack up a big score. However, your continued enjoyment is dependent almost entirely on your disposition towards score attack gameplay. I would have appreciated something akin to a challenge mode, a collection of levels in which you must clear bloks within a set number of moves. It would offer an alternative goal apart from the elusive "high score," plus it could help inspire advanced combos that can then be employed in the main game. The available modes are decent, but something else is definitely needed to "cleanse the palate" between modes as well as to extend the game's lifespan. Bomb Monkey is a solid puzzler that keeps the rules as well as the controls nice and simple. It might not totally blow you away or engage you for long if you aren't a total score junkie. Still, the ability to play with another person on a single 3DS is such a novel treat that I can see the game being pulled out months down the line for quick pick-up games with your friends.
 photo

Without a doubt, Renegade Kid totally killed it with Mutant Mudds earlier this year. With a simple, no-frills structure that struck a major chord with players, the eShop platformer was a sweet dose of purity in a genre that's...

 photo

Bomb Monkey will hit the eShop next week


Jun 21
// Chris Carter
Remember when I told you that Bomb Monkey would be out "hopefully in Q2 2012"? Well it looks like there's nothing to worry about, as the game will finally be gracing the eShop next Thursday, June 28th, for $4.99 (nice!). For...
 photo

Bomb Monkey flings a trailer at your face


Jun 15
// Tony Ponce
Bomb Monkey, Renegade Kid's follow-up to the stellar Mutant Mudds, has been shrouded in secrecy since its original announcement. So shrouded, in fact, that Jonathan Holmes was forced on pain of DEATH to not film any gameplay...
 photo

The DTOID Show: Dawnguard, Tokyo Jungle & Overstrike


Jun 15
// Max Scoville
Oh my darlings, here's today's Destructoid Show. Tara's still gone, because she's getting stung/bitten by bees/dogs, but Anthony's here to fill in. Anthony and I have fun. Today's news: Playdead's working on a follow-up to L...
 photo

How's your baby-throwing arm? Offspring Fling is out


Mar 30
// Tony Ponce
To all would-be parents, how prepared are you for the big day? You could probably stand to brush up on some important child-raising skills. For instance, how far can you toss a baby? You'll never know when you'll need to chuc...
 photo

Tokyo Jungle's animal outfits are too much


Mar 28
// Jordan Devore
The PlayStation 3 game in which a humorously diverse population of animals has taken over a human-less Tokyo just got slightly more absurd. It's not enough that there are Pomeranians fighting lions in Tokyo Jungle; no, we nee...
 photo

I'm hoping by now, you guys have all read Conrad Zimmerman's great writeup about Assassin's Creed III, and how it looks awesome and how there is snow. Now, here's an interview I did with Ubisoft Montreal's Alex Hutchinson. He was nice enough to answer some questions about the game's setting, the multiplayer, and most importantly, what kind of animals are in the game and can I eat them.

 photo

Bomb Monkey 'hopefully' out by Q2 2012


Mar 12
// Chris Carter
After being pestered for a bit, Renegade Kid recently confirmed on their Twitter that their eShop latest, Bomb Monkey, will be headed for the 3DS marketplace in "Q2, hopefully". While it isn't a hard release date, most of us ...
 photo

Renegade Kid's next eShop game is about bombs and monkeys


Mar 06
// Tony Ponce
Score one for Mutant Mudds! Renegade Kid's basic yet unbelievably enjoyable platformer for the 3DS has been kicking ass in a big way. In addition to the widespread critical acclaim, the game has been receiving plenty of expos...
 photo

Nintendo of America has hired a spokesdog


Feb 08
// Jordan Devore
They would do such a thing, wouldn't they? Yes, it's true -- Nintendo of America now has a spokesdog for February, which is Responsible Pet Owners Month. He's a Jack Russell terrier named Uggie who has also appeared in TV com...
 photo

Offspring Fling is all about throwing babies


Feb 02
// Tony Ponce
Do you guys remember playing Depict1 on Newgrounds? It was a puzzle platformer that fed you inaccurate instructions, so you had to ignore those directions in order to clear the game. It was made by indie developer Kyle Pulve...
 photo

HAWP: Why is there a bird on your shoulder?


Jan 26
// Tony Ponce
It's seriously the most random thing ever. This installment of Hey Ash, Whatcha Playin'? premiered during MAGFest, but I didn't bother to check for any new show uploads on GameTrailers until just a few hours ago. I hope you ...
 photo

Yahtzee's new game takes cues from Cave Story


Jan 12
// Tony Ponce
Ben "Yahtzee" Croshaw, the Escapist's bitter game critic who totally is Jim Sterling's brother / possible doppelgänger, has been known to make videogames from time to time. He's been toiling away in Game Maker for a whi...
 photo

Bear, the Skyrim chronicles


Jan 12
// Tony Ponce
Good news and bad news time! Bad news: this is not about SQUIDbear. Good news: no "arrow to the knee" bullsh*t. Enjoy the harrowing tale of... a bear. Skyrim : Bear [YouTube] (Very nice job, Joe!)
 photo

Cave Story maker releases iOS game about saving(?) seals


Jan 11
// Tony Ponce
Daisuke "Pixel" Amaya, the creator of everyone's favorite freeware-turned-paid-game Cave Story, has just released his first title on the App Store. Azarashi, an updated version of a quickie time-waster he made over a decade a...
 photo

These cats are better than you at Fruit Ninja


Dec 30
// Dale North
Gaming animals are rare, so we should treasure them. Especially on slow news days.  "Cat playing Fruit Ninja" is Mack1094's first YouTube video, and it's already nearing 49,000 views. His adorable kitty is a pro at Frui...
 photo

Bethesda devs actually talk about Squidbear


Oct 29
// Max Scoville
In case you guys missed yesterday's Destructoid Show, we had some big news. On their first ever Skyrim-centric episode of the official Bethesda podcast, a couple of the artists discussed Squidbear. I guess the mora...

Review: Rocketbirds: Hardboiled Chicken

Oct 17 // Victoria Medina
Rocketbirds: Hardboiled Chicken (PlayStation Network)Developer: Ratloop AsiaPublisher: Ratloop AsiaReleased: October 18, 2011MSRP: $11.99 Rocketbirds: Hardboiled Chicken puts players in the shoes of Hardboiled, a rebel chicken out to overthrow the evil and tyrannical penguin army. The single-player campaign is of a decent length, with 15 chapters of action, platforming and puzzles that will probably take about six hours to complete. There is a co-op section that I, sadly, didn't get to try. If it's anything like the single-player portion however, it's a lot of fun. The campaign is entirely a 2D affair, though the environment has 3D elements and, as my above statements suggest, it is an action platformer with some puzzle bits. The controls are fairly straightforward and, considering this was originally a PC game, tight and easy to pick up. As a killer chicken, expect to do a lot of bird murdering with a variety of weapons, including guns and grenades. There are also some clever puzzles scattered throughout the levels, and not all of the solutions are obvious at a glance. One of the major mechanics of the title, brain bugs, will allow players to take control of penguins. Some of the puzzles are only solvable by controlling a penguin, which is rather amusing. Once control has switched over to a penguin, you are given freedom to explore without fear of dying. Unless you shoot another penguin, you can walk around unmolested, which is sometimes necessary. When the pressure to slaughter finally overwhelms you, fear not: until you complete a penguin-control section, a limitless supply of killable birds is provided, and once a mind-slave dies, the penguin army goes back to business as usual. The other major part of the game is flight. There are a few levels that will require flying with rockets (because Rocketbirds), and while these sections served to add diversity to the game, they were also my least favorite. They aren't terrible, and even though they were the least interesting bits of the game, they were still challenging. The whole point in these areas is to eliminate the flying guards, which include regular grunts and rocket-launcher-wielding penguins, in order to board dirigibles. All that is required of these levels is flying around and shooting, which sounds a bit easier than it actually was. The camera, which started off zoomed-out to give a view of the entire area, would eventually zoom in, which not only limited visibility, but made finding enemies tricky at times. During later flight sections, five or six enemies would come out at a time, and at least two were always RPG-equipped penguins. Between trying to kill the birds, avoiding enemy fire and running away from rockets, things could get pretty complicated and death happened more than once. One thing that helped was that the rockets follow Hardboiled. It's bad if you aren't paying attention, but useful if you can get the missiles to hit a penguin instead of you. There was no shortage of creativity in killing penguins. While there were a number of options on how to go about the gleeful slaughter, none of the gun choices really mattered. Although each weapon had a unique rate of fire and power output, there was never a need to mix it up, because once a penguin was hit, juggling them was easy. All the weapons achieved the same goal relatively easily. Once I found a gun that fit my play style, that was the only one I used for pretty much the entire game. Combat was not overly challenging. Unlike in some games, I never felt that death was a punishment. Whenever I died, it was because I had done something wrong and all that was needed was a new approach. My favorite part about combat was that enemies required a bit of strategy to beat -- not in weapons used, but in how the fight was handled. It wasn't simply a matter of run and gun. Riot police (complete with shield and baton) required a different approach than grunts, or elite penguins. Despite the lack of attention paid to weapons, there was enough variety in enemies that combat never felt stale or boring. While no motivation is needed for Hardboiled to kill penguins (do we ever really need a reason to shoot things in videogames?), he does have a back story, which is presented in cut scenes between chapters. There's no voice acting in these flashbacks, but the scenes do a fantastic job of conveying the story without words. Plus, if there was dialogue, it would be harder to hear the incredible music by indie band New World Revolution, and the music is much better than words. Tunes by N.W.R. are about the only music you'll hear in the game, but they fit well and there was never a need for lots of background music. As far as the story goes, while a history on our hero may not have been necessary, it is a nice touch that adds some weight to what Hardboiled is doing, and may be the only serious part of the entire game. Any other dialogue or interactions that take place within the story tend to be humorous and light. Penguins will occasionally have conversations, or think aloud, and the obvious angle is comedy. I stopped what I was doing more than once just to see what a penguin or rebel had to say. The game's bright art style adds to the feeling that this is meant to be a fun and lighthearted experience, despite the serious tone the story can take, and the levels are varied enough that they don't ever feel reused or overdone. There isn't a ton of exploration, and the gameplay is fairly linear, but different paths can be found that lead to the same goal. This gives some choice in not only the way you get where you're going, but how you defeat enemies (or sneak past them; the game offers a few stealthy routes). There are also little signs in each level, tucked into corners and out-of-the-way areas, which encourages not only exploration but retracing your steps. The only thing that was upsetting about the entire title was its length; Rocketbirds was so enjoyable that it was sort of a downer when the game ended -- which is more of a compliment to the developers than a legitimate complaint. It isn't at all too short for the price, and with the extra unlockables and co-op mode, there is plenty there if you're concerned about getting your money's worth. Perhaps I'm just being selfish, especially considering five extra levels were added for the PSN release, but I want more of this game. Despite my selfish demand for more Hardboiled Chicken, I am pleased with Rocketbirds overall and can't wait to see what Ratloop Asia does next. Making the jump from one platform to another can be tricky and doesn't always turn out well, but they did a fantastic job. Not only did they take their time making sure that the different controls worked properly and the game would look good, they added new content and gave fans a reason to pick up the game on the PSN. Rocketbirds does everything well: the story is solid, the combat is fairly balanced, the puzzles are never too hard and there is quite a bit of replayability. No one element makes this game great; instead, all of the various pieces are put together seamlessly enough that the entire package makes the experience enjoyable. It did feel as though Ratloop Asia was playing it safe (which is understandable and hard to blame them for); it would have been nice to see them try to bring something unique to the table. The game is incredibly polished, and all of the components fit very well together, but they are all components that other games have introduced with a slightly different twist. They have clearly mastered the action platformer, now I would like to see them take it further and try something new. That is not to say I did not enjoy playing it; far from it. It was an incredibly entertaining experience and I will be saddened greatly if there is no sequel, but because they did so well with this title, I will be expecting something even better next time. I have faith that they can pull it off.
 photo

Growing up playing side-scrolling action games like Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee and Another World has cemented my love of the genre, so any time I get the chance to play another title in that vein, I jump at the chance. Enter Roc...


Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...