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Aksys Games

XBlaze Code: Embryo photo
XBlaze Code: Embryo

XBlaze Code: Embryo is the BlazBlue game you didn't know you wanted


Visual novels are love
Jun 26
// Brittany Vincent
Can't get enough BlazBlue? Check out XBlaze Code: Embryo, something completely different. Arc System Works' visual novel follows Touya Kagari as he finds himself entangled within a network of secretive organizations and a gag...
EVO money photo
EVO money

Arc System Works, Aksys add $30k to BlazBlue EVO 2014 pot


Guilty Gear Xrd -SIGN- playable, if I was BlazGreen I would die
Jun 24
// Steven Hansen
I had a pretty nice EVO 2013 at the live streaming get together we here are Destructoid threw in a San Francisco bar. Meanwhile, contestants (as opposed to us novice drunks) are in store for an even nicer EVO 2014 as Arc...
Persona-like photo
Persona-like

Hope you don't mind: Mind Zero now available on Vita


Persona-like
May 27
// Steven Hansen
Mind Zero is a dungeon crawler wherein high schoolers with mind powers battle against a seedy government, alternating between the real and spirit world. And it's out today in North America, physical and digital, and will be out in Europe right after, exclusively as a digital title.
Muramasa DLC discount photo
Muramasa DLC discount

Hot deal: Muramasa Rebirth DLC discounted on PSN


Both Genroku Legends available for $2.49 apiece
May 20
// Kyle MacGregor
Aksys Games has some nice deals on PlayStation Vita this week, with both episodes of Muramasa Rebirth's Genroku Legends downloadable content available for a song. A Cause to Diakon For and Fishy Tales of the Ne...
BlazBlue Visual Novel photo
BlazBlue Visual Novel

BlazBlue spin-off gets a trailer, demo out on PSN


XBlaze: Code Embryo hits PS3 and Vita in full next month
May 15
// Kyle MacGregor
Have you ever wondered what BlazBlue would be like if Arc System Works removed all the fighting game bits? Probably not. But, on the off chance you're interested in finding out, the brand-new demo for XBlaze: ...
XBlaze Code: Embryo photo
XBlaze Code: Embryo

BlazBlue visual novel gets a demo for PS3, Vita this week


Take XBlaze Code: Embryo for a spin this Tuesday!
May 11
// Kyle MacGregor
XBlaze Code: Embryo, a visual novel set in the BlazBlue universe, is coming to North America for both PlayStation 3 and Vita on June 24. Until then, Asksys Games is hoping to whet your appetite with a demo version. That'll be...
Fighting Games photo
Fighting Games

Arcana Heart 3: Love Max strikes PS3, Vita this fall in North America


'Bash the cute out of each other'
Apr 30
// Kyle MacGregor
Arcana Heart 3: Love Max is air-dashing its way to PlayStation 3 and Vita in North America this autumn, Aksys Games has announced.  The all-girl fighting game from Examu and Arc System Works is an enhanced version of the...
BlazBlue Vita photo
BlazBlue Vita

BlazBlue: Chrono Phantasma gets an official Vita release date


June 24th
Apr 14
// Chris Carter
BlazBlue: Chrono Phantasma has arrived on the PlayStation 3, but we were waiting on a Vita release date for what seems like forever. Until this week that is, when publisher Aksys Games announced that the Vita port will arrive...
Mind Zero photo
Mind Zero

Mind Zero crawling to PlayStation Vita next month


Persona-like RPG hitting North America and Europe in late May
Mar 28
// Kyle MacGregor
Get ready to go crazy, because Mind Zero is coming west next month. The PlayStation Vita dungeon crawler will debut as physical and retail release in North America on May 27 before making its way to Europe exclusively via do...
Not a game photo
Not a game

999: The Novel is a Choose Your Own Adventure book


Should have charged nine dollars
Mar 17
// Steven Hansen
What really is a game, anyway? This is a question that bothers a lot of insecure people with insignificant things to argue about. Actually, when 999 came out on iOS in Japan we learned it had removed the "escape the room" puz...
999: The Novel photo
999: The Novel

999: The Novel is coming to iOS


On March 17th for $4.99
Mar 11
// Chris Carter
Aksys Games is bringing the DS game 999: 9 Hours, 9 Persons, 9 Doors to life in the form of a visual novel on iOS.  It's set to drop on March 17th and priced at $4.99 -- since it is interactive, you'll have some choices,...
Muramasa DLC photo
Muramasa DLC

Muramasa Rebirth's second DLC is out next week


'Genroku Legends A Cause to Daikon For'
Feb 20
// Chris Carter
Muramasa Rebirth is getting its second DLC campaign next week, and it's the most interesting one yet. It features Gonbe, a widowed farmer, and his grass roots rebellion against his lord. He has a sickle, bamboo spe...

Review: Sorcery Saga: Curse of the Great Curry God

Feb 02 // Wesley Ruscher
Sorcery Saga: Curse of the Great Curry God (PS Vita)Developer: Compile Heart, ZeroDivPublisher: Aksys GamesReleased: December 10, 2013MSRP: $39.99 Sorcery Saga tells a story that is about as light-hearted as it gets. Pupuru, a recently suspended magic school student, loves nothing more than the delicious curry from Smile Curry. It’s the local restaurant that is facing tough times due to the new mega trendy chain store that has opened up in town. Sort of like the Starbucks of curry shops, this corporate conglomeration is running out all the local competition with its cheap and quick curry. Luckily for Pupuru, and her local shop, she’s happened to come across a magical book with the recipe for the “Ultimate Curry.” It’s the one thing that can save her favorite delicatessen – and something that requires Pupuru to embark on an epic quest to gather all the necessary ingredients. Though she may not be saving the world, she’s saving her world and it couldn't be any more delightful. [embed]269883:52430:0[/embed] If you dig lighthearted anime, then you will be right at home with the game’s narrative. Ever since 999, Akysys Games has consistently delivered excellently penned banter. The game’s cast of characters is quite ridiculous, but I often found myself laughing at the absurdity of every situation between dungeon crawls. Perhaps my favorite side character was Gigadis, an evil lord from the netherworld and stalker of Pupuru. His brashness and idiotic ways can be cringeworthy at times, but it’s of no fault of the localization. The guy just constantly puts his foot in his mouth and is borderline creepy with his failed attempts to get Pupuru to fall for him (kind of like the vampire dude from Twilight -- editor’s note: this comes by way of my girlfriend). Additionally, his overly cocky theme song -- comprised of broken English -- championing why he is the greatest ever, is another reason I couldn’t help but root for the buffoon.  Alas, while you will spend a decent amount of time pushing through the game’s story segments, the meat of Sorcery Saga is not nearly as sweet as the rest of the game’s presentation. At its core this title is a hardcore Japanese roguelike. Similar to games like Shiren the Wanderer and The Guided Fate Paradox (one of my favorite titles from last year) the majority of your time will be spent grinding away through the depths of many punishing dungeons. Roguelikes are known for their often unfair difficulty spikes and Sorcery Saga is no different. The game starts innocently, as it warms players to its subtle nuances that separates it from others in the genre, but by the time the third dungeon is reached you can expect more than a few occasions that make you want to toss your Vita in disgust. Death can come swiftly without notice, no matter how prepared you are. The game incorporates all the nastiest staples of the genre and it’s not afraid to pile them on and make you cry. There are enemies that can walk through walls; randomly overly powerful suicidal creatures; traps that cause status ailments; random floors that take away abilities (like using items or spells); and random floors filled with overwhelming amounts of monsters. The sense of elation when you overcome the odds is one of the greatest gifts the game can instill in its players, but sadly dying and losing all your on-hand inventory is an all too frequent occurrence. The game does do a modest job in bringing a sense of freshness to the genre with its cooking system. Along with dropping weapons, gear, and other useful items, defeated enemies drop basic ingredients for creating your own delicious curry. Collecting these items in each dungeon, and then bringing back to Curry Smile, will grant Pupuru with guaranteed recipes she can execute in a dungeon when no enemies are present. You can still attempt to mix ingredients without recipes, but often the results end in inedible disasters. Where cooking comes in handy is in the status buffs it can provide for Pupuru and her A.I.-controlled partner Kuu. Cooking the right curry recipe can make all the difference in successfully navigating any one of the game’s tumultuous floors. But luck still plays a major factor since the status isn't permanent and food can rot as well. The other standout feature to Sorcery Saga is Pupuru’s bunny-like companion Kuu. He fights alongside of you in dungeons and is quite handy when he behaves properly. Like Pupuru, he begins each dungeon at level one (it’s a roguelike thing), but how he gets stronger is all up to the player. A garbage disposal of sorts, Kuu levels up from all the unwanted items you feed him. The types of items you toss down his gullet additionally grants him extra skills (like weapon forging) that can make all the difference in escaping the game’s later stages. My only real complaint of Kuu comes from the way he sometime just does what he wants. He can often get stuck on an obstacle, and subsequently left behind. You need him alive to progress floors, so when he goes off and dies having to backtrack for him and can be quite costly. He’s a great companion when he’s by your side, but he can also be your worst nightmare  -- especially when he’s starving, since his hunger pangs attract monsters. The only other thing that irked me in Sorcery Saga was the random slowdown that would hit the game at times. When you look at the game’s visuals, you can’t help but think you’re playing an uprezzed PS One game -- which makes this phenomenon all the more strange. It’s never to the point where it makes the game unplayable, but it’s frankly inexcusable for a game with such simple graphics. In the end, Sorcery Saga was a title that took me by surprise. It may not the best of games, but it’s far from the worst. Its lighthearted nature is hard to recommend if you're not a fan of the genre, but if you're willing to try something a little different, there’s enough delicious pleasantries served throughout to satisfy anyone's dungeon-crawling cravings.
Sorcery Saga reviewed photo
I'm still hungry
With the amount of role-playing adventures I’ve journeyed through in my life that culminate in apocalyptic showdowns, I’m a little tired. Save the world, rinse, and repeat. It’s so rare that a Japanese RPG d...

Muramasa DLC photo
Muramasa DLC

Muramasa's Uprising of the Oone Resistance DLC detailed


Starring Gonbei
Jan 16
// Chris Carter
Muramasa: Rebirth is set to have four side stories arrive in the form of DLC, and they all seem to be pretty meaty diversions. America just got its first, The Fishy Tales of Nekomata, and the second has just dropped in ...

Review: Muramasa Rebirth: Tales of the Nekomata DLC

Jan 15 // Chris Carter
Muramasa Rebirth: Fishy Tales of the Nekomata (PlayStation Vita)Developer: MarvelousAQLPublisher: Aksys GamesReleased: January 14, 2014 (US) / January 22, 2014 (EU)MSRP: $4.99 First things first, upon downloading the first DLC, Fishy Tales of the Nekomata, you'll have the option to select "Genroku Legends" from the main menu (don't forget the title update if it's not showing up). That's right -- there's no need to complete the core story in any way, as each DLC is a completely separate option that has no ties to your original save file -- Genroku Legends has its own menu and save system, almost like an expansion. That's great news for newcomers, as the tales are not only gaidens (side stories), but they also don't require any prior knowledge or specific ending to enjoy. As an added bonus, they can be played on both Legend and Chaos difficulty from the start. Fishy Tales of the Nekomata starts off right -- with the ability to control an adorable cat and innocently spy on some villagers. The tale quickly goes from cute to disturbing however, as a brother and sister are brutally murdered by thugs hired by her family's chef, all for a prized tea set that was going to be delivered to the shogun. Swearing revenge, Okoi is transformed into an avatar of hate by way of the aforementioned feline, and becomes a host to a cat demon. In true Muramasa form, the cat spirit (Nekomata) is based on actual Japanese folklore. This is where things get pretty interesting, despite the fact that this tale is essentially a familial and more intimate affair. All of the characters (even the vile betrayer) are interesting, and Fishy Tales really did a great job of sucking me into Okoi's world. It helps that there's full spoken Japanese dialog present in tandem with the impeccable Vita translation, and it really drives home the point that this DLC isn't some cheap rush-job addition. Okoi's gameplay and fighting style is also very fluid, and you can take advantage of her standard human form with the added benefit of claw attacks, as well as her "Miike" form (which is literally a cat) who can scratch and breathe fire, and the all-powerful "Avatar" special attack (which is only usable after you power up a special meter). Both main forms have their advantages, and are unique in their own way as you'll soon learn after busting out your first few combos with them. It's like playing with two different characters in a fighting game. The Avatar is pretty ridiculous, as you're able to commandeer a phantom spirit consisting of a giant face made up of cats. You can breath fire and attack as one, and as usual, the animation is top notch. It adds ridiculous element to the game and complements the theme of the DLC perfectly -- not to mention it's fun to actually use. When your meter runs out all the cats scurry off. Adorable. Changing forms is like changing swords in the core game (with durability in tow), but more fun and impactful. Rather than shift to a similar-looking sword that may not make a whole lot of difference (depending on your equipment of course), morphing between human and cat form makes for a vastly different set of tactics every time. Learning when to use close combat and ranged attacks is not only fun, but unique to Okoi as a character, which further differentiates the DLC from the main game in a good way. You'll also still have a skill tree (which is also specific to Okoi, and not to the swords like Rebirth proper), equipment unique to the DLC, and all of the other details that Rebirth allows for Kisuke and Momohime. It also still looks as beautiful and as smooth as ever, and most importantly, it's still challenging. Even the first fight on Legend difficulty can be an ordeal, and it kept me on my toes throughout the entire DLC. Nekomata will run you around two to three hours your first time through, although there is a speedrun trophy for finishing it under an hour. This might sound light, but it ensures that the story is streamlined, and results in less backtracking or tedium. In ways, it's more fun than the core game because it's basically nonstop action and story with little downtime. There are also two endings and a boss rush mode should you want more. I heartily enjoyed my time as a cat in Muramasa Rebirth, and I can't wait to see what the other DLC stories can do. Vanillaware ingeniously was able to tie the heart of the game into its first Genroku Legends side story, while giving it a fine heart of its own. It's so well done in fact, that I could easily see a full game starring Okoi one day.
Muramasa DLC reviewed photo
Meow-velous
Muramasa Rebirth is a fine upgrade to the original game, but there was one thing that didn't sit right with me. For whatever reason, someone decided to take the only new content that was created for the game (four new ch...

Muramasa Rebirth photo
Muramasa Rebirth

Muramasa Rebirth gets a trailer for its second DLC


He's a farmer who attacks enemies with his tools
Jan 09
// Chris Carter
Muramasa Rebirth was re-released on the PlayStation Vita, and not only does it look great, but it plays great as well. Four DLCs await us in turn with new characters and tales, the second of which can be previewed above by w...
Aksys' Magus photo
Aksys' Magus

Umm, Aksys has a short teaser for PS3 exclusive Magus


'More than a man'
Nov 20
// Steven Hansen
Aksys has released an incredibly brief teaser trailer for its upcoming action game Magus, co-developed by Black Tower. I mean brief. There are more logos than footage. Magus is headed exclusively to PS3 early 2014. In it, yo...
Vanillaware photo
Vanillaware

Muramasa Rebirth transports DLC westward early next year


Meow
Nov 01
// Kyle MacGregor
Muramasa Rebirth's long-awaited Genroku Legends downloadable add-ons will finally make their way to North America in early 2014, Aksys Games has announced. The supplementary content for Vanillaware's PlayStation Vita action ...
PS Vita photo
PS Vita

Aksys looks to curry favor with new Sorcery Saga trailer


Hot and spicy, everything nicely
Oct 12
// Kyle MacGregor
Aksys Games' upcoming roguelike dungeon crawler certainly seems good-humored. In Sorcery Saga: Curse of the Great Curry God, an adventurous young chef sets out on a quest to save a local restaurant by whipping up t...
Aksys 3DS and Vita sale photo
Aksys 3DS and Vita sale

Aksys throwing a sale on 3DS and Vita digital shops


Save big bucks on Virtue's Last Reward, Muramasa, BIT.TRIP, and BlazBlue
Aug 22
// Tony Ponce
Atlus isn't the only company ringing in the start of a new school year. Aksys Games is also so pleased that all the little brats are sweating in a classroom where they belong that it decided to place a number of games on the ...
Otome Games photo
Otome Games

Sweet Fuse: At Your Side hits PSP in August


Otome game starring Keiji Inafune's niece drops later this summer
Jul 26
// Kyle MacGregor
Sweet Fuse: At Your Side will arrive on August 27, Aksys Games has announced. In addition to being among the last games join the PlayStation Portable's library, the title's release marks something of a rarity, as otome visual...
PS Vita photo
PS Vita

Aksys to publish PS Vita roguelike about cooking curry


Deliciously bizarre
Jul 07
// Kyle MacGregor
Aksys Games announced its next project at Anime Expo in Los Angeles earlier this weekend and it certainly sounds strange. The Muramasa Rebirth publisher has acquired the license to localize the hilariously named So...

Review: Muramasa Rebirth

Jun 28 // Chris Carter
Muramasa Rebirth (PlayStation Vita)Developer: VanillawarePublisher: Aksys GamesReleased: June 25, 2013MSRP: $39.99 Muramasa actually gives you pretty much all the tools you need at the start of the game after you choose one of the two potential main characters -- Kisuke or Momohime --  each who have a different story (but ultimately visit the exact same areas, just in a different order). In a somewhat initially confusing fashion, each character can equip up to three swords, allowing the player to switch between them. If you use a sword too long, it breaks, forcing you to switch to another while it "heals" (they're spirit swords) and recovers its durability. Everything's great from a combat perspective, as all the staples are fully intact -- the downward thrust, the uppercut slash, the dashing cut, dodge rolling, blocking -- it's all right there at the start, and it allows for quite a bit of finesse and skill based play. As I said, these are pretty much all of the tools you're going to get during the roughly two 10 hour campaigns outside of crafting, and it's just about all you're ever going to need. But while the setup and foundation are solid, where the game somewhat fails is that most of the time, it doesn't quite give you a venue to show off said finesse, as it's consistently intent on delivering you handfuls of goons and relatively low-rent enemies who don't do much more than fill the screen. Thankfully, the environments are classic Vanillaware -- gorgeous and full of life, especially on the Vita's OLED screen -- and compliment the incredible soundtrack quite well to the point where you may not mind it as much. Boss fights are the absolute highlight of the game, and show off how fun the combat system really can be without any elements of repetition involved. In top Vanillaware form, every boss looks incredible from a visual standpoint, and will test your skills to the max mechanically -- especially on a higher difficulty setting. I'd go so far as to say that a few of them in particular are among my favorites of this generation, as they have a clear old school feel to them, and a sense of challenge. With a pared down story and a few more boss fights, any semblance of combat repetition could have been eliminated -- they're that fun. It's not just thug fighting that gets repetition too -- actually getting around in the game's environments, despite how stunning they are, is at points, grating. Often times playing Muramasa is like playing a sprawling Metroidvania with large heaps of barren wastelands, with massive amounts of backtracking. Some form of real fast-travel system outside of the bare-bones one included, even if it was only for areas you've been to before and at limited areas (save points) would have been a key addition in the Vita version, but alas, you'll be hoofing it quite a bit -- and thankfully, that's when you can put the Vita on its idle setting and come back later. The translation is definitely improved from the Wii version, as each character is now more defined. Kisuke is a lot more standoffish in particular here, as his newly improved dialog helps cement his cold demeanor far better than the original script. While I didn't notice an Earth shattering difference in quality, you can easily tell that it is superior if you've played the original. As a side note, the voices are still in Japanese, and they're still great. Outside of the flaws of the original, there is one major new problem that should be addressed: the DLC elephant in the room. The powers that be have strangely decided to not include the four new characters in the retail version in favor of selling them as DLC, for an undetermined price, and at an undetermined date. When you're charging fans for a full price portable version of something that's barely been updated content wise, you better have a few extras ready to sway people -- but in this case, it's paid DLC not available at launch. While the core game with all its blemishes and wonder is fully preserved, I can't help but think how great this re-release could have been with the characters fully intact as unlockables. For those of you who are on the fence, waiting for a verdict on the DLC and picking up the Vita version at a lower price may be the best option. But in spite of the lack of new content, Muramasa at its core stands on its own as a solid action game. Vanillaware's visual style is absolutely timeless, and even though you may get sick of seeing the same locales over and over, the Vita's portability and instant standby feature make it much easier to pick up and play over the course of a few days. If you've already played Muramasa to death, I doubt you'll find anything worth paying full price for in Rebirth (yet), but for those of you who haven't experienced it and haven't played a Vanillaware game, this is a great way to see that beautiful art everyone keeps talking about.
Muramasa Rebirth review photo
A slightly sharper blade
Muramasa: The Demon Blade was probably Vanillaware's most uneven game. Alongside of the expected spectacular visuals, a beautiful soundtrack, and surprisingly simple yet enjoyable combat system, came a fairly uninteresting st...

Muramasa Rebirth Vita photo
Muramasa Rebirth Vita

Muramasa is reborn on the PlayStation Vita this week


I can't get enough Vanillaware
Jun 26
// Chris Carter
Although Muramasa wasn't my favorite Vanillaware game, it still had the signature style of the developer, and ultimately was an enjoyable experience. It looks like I'll be giving it one more shot this week on the Vita, in th...
PS Plus Update photo
PS Plus Update

Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward goes free via PS Plus


Sony rolls out another set of deals for its premium service
Jun 24
// Kyle MacGregor
Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward headlines this week's PlayStation Plus update. The follow-up to 999: Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors joins Sony's Instant Game Collection today as a free download on PlayStation Vita for...
 photo

Save big time on a bunch of Bit.Trip games on Steam


Up to 75% off in savings for two weeks
May 10
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Gaijin Games has a huge sale going on right now on a bunch of the Bit.Trip games over on Steam. Bit.Trip Collection (Bit.Trip Beat, Runner, Core, and Void) is going for $11.98, and that includes the soundtracks for each game....
 photo

Slice all the things in this Muramasa Rebirth trailer


Plus the song is pretty badass
May 09
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Muramasa is gorgeous, this we know. It's still always a delight to see the game in action though, as is the case with this latest gameplay trailer for Muramasa Rebirth. Not much longer till the release! Rebirth will be out o...
Muramasa Rebirth photo
Muramasa Rebirth

Muramasa Rebirth out on June 25 for the Vita


Collector's Edition also announced
Apr 10
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Muramasa Rebirth is an amazing experience that plays great on the Vita. And now we know the game will be out on June 25 for the PlayStation handheld. What's that? You want more? Lucky for you, Aksys Games has a Collector's Ed...
Muramasa Rebirth photo
Muramasa Rebirth

Check out Muramasa Rebirth's improved translation


Compare these screens from both Wii and Vita versions
Apr 06
// Tony Ponce
Muramasa Rebirth, the Vita port of 2009's Muramasa: The Demon Blade for Wii, is more than just a simple up-res. As noted in Steven Hansen's recent preview, publisher Aksys Games has re-translated the game, resulting in a much...

Muramasa for Vita is amazing, plays great

Mar 27 // Steven Hansen
This is one of the prettiest games I’ve ever seen. Like, look at these screenshots, and then imagine something infinitely better, thanks to meticulous animation and other visual flourishes. The copper haze of a setting sun, pink cherry blossom leaves fluttering on the wind. Man, I’m as much of a sucker for cherry blossoms as I am for rain-slick neon signage. It’s the best foliage. The Japanese mythology inspired aesthetic is such a treat. For the similarly uninitiated, Muramasa stars two protagonists, an amnesiac ninja being hunted by his own alleged former friends, Kisuke; and a princess, Momohime, whose body has been possessed by an evil spirit. The two characters are making their ways in opposite directions (east to west, west to east), all the while trying to collect all 108 Demon Blades. Collecting Demon Blades is an important part of the game. Either character can have three equipped at any given time and each carries its own special move. The blades wear down with use -- particularly when deflecting attacks or using special moves -- and will eventually “break,” requiring it to be sheathed and you to switch to a different blade. After a while in the sheath, broken blades will repair, incidentally sapping your soul in the process. They are demon blades, after all. There are two types of blades, quicker ones and slower long blades, which also help differentiate the 108 amongst each other beyond their special moves, which get decidedly complex for the better swords. In addition to finding blades throughout the game, they can be forged from enough souls and other items, from the start menu. The environment is littered with other items, including cooking supplies. With the purchase of cookbooks, you can do into certain locations and order food, actually pressing square to take bites or dip individual sushi rolls in soy sauce before scarfing down. It’s kind of amazing. The cook in me dug it. You can also go to hot springs patronized by monkeys and chill with them to replenish your health. Best game. I tried out both characters in a couple of separate, early boss fights, and I dig the combat a lot. The jump button is now mapped to “x,” versus the Wii version that employed a fighting game styled “press up to jump,” and it works well. The boss fights are lengthy varied, and multi-tiered -- switching betwixt blades and using different specials in conjunction with combos helps to that end, too. There also two gameplay modes, one of which is suited to a more hack and slash, level up style, and the other of which calls more precise swordplay. Other environments are strung together 2D exploration, with a sort of overworld hub linking various locations in the game. Rather than have enemies bandying about, the game uses something like a random encounter mechanism, in which you’ll be attacked by a group of enemies, have a quick brawl, and keep on keeping on. Otherwise, the there is a lot of exploration off of the beaten path available as you collect money or items or find out of the way locations to talk to various NPCs, all of whom feel interesting and worth talking to due to the incredibly original art style. If you haven’t played Muramasa yet, Muramasa: Rebirth is a welcomed point of entry. Even if you’ve played it, you might want to check out the fresh localization and banging visuals, as well as the additional, post-launch content. It’s a perfect game for handhelds.
Muramasterful photo
Hoping to breathe new life into an underrated gem
God damn this game is pretty. Vanillaware’s 2009 Wii title Muramasa: The Demon Blade inevitably pops up in just about any discussion of the best Wii games. It’s sitting on my shelf, snug in its shrink wrap, becaus...


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