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Nintendo partners with DreamWorks for 3DS videos


Oct 04
// Dale North
Nintendo has signed a deal with DreamWorks Animation to bring their videos to the 3DS...in stunning 3D. Kicking this partnership off will be a couple of Halloween-themed animated shorts, the first of which, a "Monsters vs. Al...
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Study says 51 percent of gamers are against 3D consoles


Sep 29
// Dale North
I'm not against 3D consoles; I just don't want one. You can have one -- sure. If it doesn't hurt your eyes and scramble your brain like it does for me, enjoy.  Games comparison and marketplace site Playr2.com h...
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The House of the Dead on PS3 may make your eyes hate you


Sep 27
// Liam Fisher
The nostalgia-fest that is The House of the Dead: Overkill - Extended Cut for PS3 continues with Sega's announcement that the game will support not only Sterescopic 3D on your fancy new display, but also the anaglyphic 3...
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Study: 3D gaming unpopular among 3DS owners


Sep 25
// Jim Sterling
Research group Interpret LLC claims that almost a third of 3DS owners feel the system's main attraction -- its 3D screen -- actively detracts from the gaming experience. Shockingly, there are even people who don't know the 3D...
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Sony's 3D head-worn visor thing costs $800, supports PS3


Sep 23
// Dale North
I saw this silly head-mounted personal 3D display earlier this year at CES. It was at Sony's booth, where I was too excited by the glasses-free 3D to care about some cyclops visor thing. It seemed like something too far away ...
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Child of Eden is ready to Move you on the 27th


Sep 23
// Smurgesborg
The PS3 version of Child of Eden is almost here and Ubisoft gave us a fancy launch trailer to show off.  There's not too much to say about it. Just like Rez the game is a swirl of pretty colors and abstract visuals, and...
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Watch the graffiti hero of Sideway: New York do his thing


Sep 21
// Victoria Medina
We've already told you about the PSN game Sideway: New York and its October 11th release date, and if you were curious, enjoy this gameplay trailer to get a look at how the 2D/3D works. The game follows Nox, a graf...

Review: The Ico & Shadow of the Colossus Collection

Sep 08 // Dale North
The Ico & Shadow of the Colossus Collection (PlayStation 3)Developer: Team ICO Publisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentTo be released: September 27, 2011MSRP: $39.99  Ico Here's the CliffsNotes version of Ico's story for those who have somehow missed this game: Ico's opening shows a young boy with horns being dragged off to a massive stone temple. He is placed inside a large stone container and put on an even larger stone shelf containing many more of these containers. The boy was to be the next sacrifice. Some kind of natural tremor happens just after his imprisonment and this allows him to escape. While working to make his way out of the temple, he encounters a mysterious girl held captive in some kind of bird cage, held up and away from scary shadow people who seem to want to drag her underground.  After freeing her, the boy finds out that they will have to work together to make it out of the temple.  Ico's gameplay is platforming, but the twist is that this boy has to drag along his companion, Yorda. Literally. You'll hold down the L1 button to hold her hand and guide her away from danger, onto platforms, over ledges and more. She really sucks at all of that, but at least she holds some mysterious power that lets her open temple doors for Ico. Together their powers make for excellent puzzle platforming. There's also a bit of scaredy-cat combat, with Ico swinging a little stick at Yorda's creepy pursuers. Your stick doesn't do much, so the swinging is frantic and sad. Still, you'll find yourself doing what you can so that she isn't dragged under.  Puzzle-platforming, dragging a girl around and wimpy stick combat together sounds tedious, but it works really well, and we have Team Ico's beautifully paced and designed levels to thank for that. Fantastic artwork, eerie audio and innovative storytelling all add to this combination to make this an unforgettable experience. It's a game that you'll be happy to get lost in. It's one of those rare games that takes you away to another place, one that's hard to forget after completion. Sure, you could nitpick on edge/ledge detection or the syrupy-slow camera movement, but I promise you that once you complete this hauntingly beautiful title, you won't be hung up on minor details like that.  Everything I've said so far applies to both the original and the PS3 remake, so if you've somehow missed this game, I'm hoping my high praise will get you to pick it up. Well, either that or its technical upgrades. Ico is even better now with its graphical overhaul. It won't blow your eyes out with color and shininess, though. Ico was always a visually muted game, and the remake does not change that. The lighting seems to have been tweaked; it's so pretty now, though not always perfect. The higher-resolution textures make the game's design and architecture even easier to appreciate. It's so true to the original that those who have played Ico won't think much about it after it gets going. They did just enough with this overhaul to make sure that anyone who wouldn't be able to get over early PS2-era graphics would have nothing to complain about here. Seriously, there's nothing to complain about. Shadow of the Colossus If you thought the opening to Ico was depressing and heavy, get a load of this: A desperate guy travels to a strange land on the back of his trusty horse. His only other companion is his dead girlfriend. Their journey ends at a sort of temple (Team Ico loves temples), and there he places this girl on an altar, begging for her life to be restored. A huge voice from the sky actually responds, telling him that he has to visit every corner of this realm to slay 16 colossi in order for his wish to be granted. Sure, no prob.  Shadow's gameplay is a mix of open-world exploration/platforming and massive, drawn-out, insanely-scaled boss battles. Our hero has to travel rugged, varied land by horse, guided only by a legendary sword that focuses sunlight as a sort of compass. About 25 percent of the fun is looking for the big bastards, and the other 75 is taking them down. Beasts of every type await you, and all of them are so huge that you'll have to scale them, working up them like you would a tower in a 3D platformer. You'll ride on the backs of massive flying creatures, hang from the fur of stories-tall upright bipedal walkers, and roll and duck from mountain-sized rammers. Each one is an absolute wonder, so much so that if you're anything like me you'll die many times just marveling at them.  The magic in Shadow is the scale, and how it shows just how weak you are in comparison. Scaling these beasts takes so long that you could look at each of the colossi as a game level. After scaling them, if you manage to survive and hang on, all sense of accomplishment fades as you peck away at the colossus's life bar with your little weapons. Each beast has a weak spot, and you'll have to use every trick in the book to find them and attack them with your comparatively small and weak sword or arrows. Only after successfully scaling a beast, managing your limited grip strength, and getting in enough hits to take its life will it fall. Trip up and you'll start all over. Trust me on this: you'll start over many, many times. Some of those times you may curse the game's wonky camera or Agro's (the horse) reluctance to let you mount, but most of the time it will be your fault. You won't care about any of this when you see just how beautifully this game's story unfolds. The original game had a few issues in the graphics department. Maybe Team Ico dreamed too big for the PS2, as I remember the game's frame rate coming down to a stutter in some really intense sections. Pop-in and other graphical glitches were blemishes on this otherwise beautiful game. I'm glad to say that all of these issues disappear in the PS3 version. And unlike Ico's upgrade, which was more subtle, Shadow's really shows off all the fine art and detail we missed in the original. This looks pretty close to a modern-day PS3 release. Everything from wall textures to backdrops looks so much better that I found myself a bit distracted during the heat of battle. I really shouldn't be dying this much, considering how many times I've played this game! Summary Everyone wins with this collection. I don't know of a fan of Team Ico's games who wouldn't kill to play them again in high definition at 1080p, not to mention with added Trophy support and a 3D option. If you're like me, and have played each of these games a few times, you'll probably forget that you're playing a PS2 game most of the time. Both games really look so good that they feel new. I'm sure that current fans of these games needed no convincing, so I'll stop here. Oh, but you've got to see the colossi in 3D! Borrow a 3D television if you must. Those who have somehow missed either or both of these titles have the perfect excuse to jump in now. The price is right at $40 for the two. You can see what all the buzz is about without having to deal with those blurry old PS2 textures and frame rates, or hiked collector's asking prices for the originals. You shouldn't notice that these are old games aside from a few small glitches. My guess is that new players will be sucked in, joining current fans in adding both of these titles to their all-time favorites list.  To the new player: I've slapped a lot of scores on a lot of games in my games-writing career, but I'm asking you to forget about scores for now. Both of these games remain at the top of my list of games to recommend, even today. I really can't think of any other games that I'd recommend more. The originals are both so lovingly crafted and inspiring that I think gamers 50 years from now will still be talking about them. No, they're not perfect, but they're both fine examples of brilliant game design, and they both put forth an experience you won't soon forget. Please, play these games.
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Two of the finest PlayStation 2 titles I know of were created by the same team. Both Shadow of the Colossus and Ico were crafted by the creative minds at Team Ico, a group that is slow to release games, but makes masterpieces...

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Star Fox, Kid Icarus, Link/Sonic porn, and more now in 3D


Aug 28
// Jonathan Holmes
One of my favorite features of the 3DS is the ability to explore the world of mainstream media in 3D. Unfortunately, other than the still expanding Nintendo Video (which has some good stuff from college humor and few quality ...
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Sony: 3DS doesn't work very well


Aug 24
// Jim Sterling
Sony has offered some snarky commentary on the 3DS, attempting to avoid a direct assault but very clearly letting the world know what it's talking about. The attack comes by way of Mick Hocking, who expressed no surprise...

Review: 3D Classics: Urban Champion

Aug 21 // Jonathan Holmes
3D Classics: Urban Champion (3DS eShop)Developer: NintendoPublisher: NintendoReleased: August 18, 2011MSRP: $4.99 "This game is genius!" giggles Miyamoto. "If only people today understood how great it is!" Iwata presses pause on the game, grabs Miyamoto by the cheeks, forcibly turns his head towards Iwata's, and looks him dead in the eyes. "I'm the President of the greatest videogame developer on the planet," he hisses. "I'll make them understand." "I'll make the world see that it doesn't get any better than Urban Champion. On the 3DS, it will become the most popular portable game of all time." "Damn straight, son!" bubbles Miyamoto. "Angry Birds can suck Urban Champion's chin-chin [Japanese word for penis]." OK, maybe it didn't happen exactly like that, but there had to be some kind of non-logic-based Folie à deux at Nintendo for a game like this to be included in the 3D Classics line-up.  Have you ever talked to someone who hates fighting games? I sure have, and I'm usually quick to ask them why they don't enjoy the genre. Most often, they say something along the lines of "They're just stupid. One guy punches another guy until one of the two guys falls down and doesn't get back up. That's all. That's it. That's stupid." In the case of most fighting games, that bleak summation would be missing a lot of the fine details. When it comes to Urban Champion, it's one-hundred percent accurate. Urban Champion is a versus fighting game with a grand total of one selectable character, who comes equipped with two types of attacks (high and low). That attack comes in two flavors (weak/fast and strong/slow), giving you a total of four different attacks, spread across two glorious buttons. As for defensive options, you can block (high or low) and dodge. That's all you get in Urban Champion; no jumping, no ducking, and there sure as hell aren't any Hadoukens. It's sort of like Punch-Out!! turned on its side, except even more simplistic. There aren't even any health meters. The winner of each fight is determined by who can knock the other guy off the opposing side of the screen first. The combat plays out sort of like competitive rock/papers/scissors, except without the scissors. Rock (high punch) crushes paper (low guard) unless paper (low punch) hits rock (high guard) first, and vice versa. You could also say that Urban Champion is like that non-videogame game where you try to slap someone on the top of their hands before they can move them out of the way. It's game that wholly relies on reflexes and guessing games, rather than on dexterity or complex strategy. There are a couple of other random elements thrown into the game to keep things from getting totally repetitive. Disapproving neighbors will try to drop flowers pots on you and your combatant. If they score a hit, you'll be dazed, giving your enemy an opportunity for a free attack. The cops also come by every so often, breaking up the fight and causing the young, eager street toughs to head back to their respective sides of the block to avoid looking like criminals. That causes the fight to more or less start over from scratch, which can be a problem as you also have to watch your stamina and your time as the match goes on. If your stamina runs out, your punches will be much slower; if time runs out, whoever is closest to losing the fight will be hauled off by the cops. And that's really all there is to the game. Nintendo didn't add too much to the formula for this re-release. Of course, you get some glasses-free stereoscopic 3D. The game's world and characters are now made from polygons, though they stay completely faithful to the original game's low-res, sprite-based style. The 3D here looks really good, especially with the angled camera mode turned on. Seeing old NES games remade with new visual pop via the 3DS' glasses-free 3D display still hasn't gotten old for me. I just hope that in the near future, we see more deserving NES games -- games like Kung-Fu, the original Mario Bros., and the previously mentioned Punch-Out!! would be great for this 3D classics treatment. That's not to say I don't like Urban Champion. I know that I really should dislike it, as it is incredibly stupid, but I just can't help but enjoy it. The game asks so little of the player in terms of thought or effort, and is so quick to reward you for simple violence, that it's hard to not get back more than you put in. It reminds me a lot of one of the many addicting micro games from the WarioWare series, except stretched out into a full, standalone title. There are a couple of catchy little chip tunes to keep you smiling, some simple and charming little animations, and constant moments of anticipation to keep you playing. "Am I about to punch a man?", "Are the cops going to catch us being bad?", and most intensely, "Why am I still playing this?" are questions you'll be constantly asking yourself while playing the game. The action, as incredibly shallow and random as it may be, is still non-stop. Unlike in most real fighting games, there are no moments of breaks between "big moments." There's no waiting out a turtling opponent, no sense of deflation after failing to pull of a big combo, or feeling as though you are incredible outclassed by your enemy. There's also no bordom in being pitted against an opponent you can easily beat the crap out of. With Urban Champion, all you get is non-stop, stupid violence. The enemy A.I. in single player mode also ramps up considerably. I've only been able to get to round 61 (which took about an hour, and earned me the in-game achievement of "Village Champion"). By that point, I was really getting my ass kicked. A quick save feature allows for you to put the game down if you don't want to slog through that many rounds in one sitting. There is also local multiplayer, though I haven't been able to test that out, as I don't actually know anyone else in real life who is willing to purchase the game. I have played "competitive" Urban Champion on the NES plenty of times though, and assuming that this 3D port is faithful enough, I can wager that the Vs. mode is just as stupid and compelling as the single player "campaign." All in all, Urban Champion is almost an un-game. There is nearly no design here. I'm sure that most of you will hate it, but I know for a fact that few like-minded readers of Dtoid will enjoy it. In fact, I've already gotten a few private messages requesting that I fight them online. The game doesn't actually support online play, which shows just how weirdly enthusiastic fans of Urban Champion can be. This is an extremely acquired taste. Even fans of the game will likely admit that it is technically shallow and idiotic, almost to the point of self-parody. That said, if you have similar tastes as Miyamoto, Iwata, and myself, you'll find yourself enjoying Urban Champion much more than you rightfully should.
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A 3D update of Urban Champion? How did this happen? Here's how I think it went down... Nintendo President Satoru Iwata (the responsible one) heads over to the house of Nintendo creative mastermind Shigeru Miyamoto (...

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Batman: Arkham City will be in 3D for PS3, 360 and PC


Aug 16
// Dale North
Warner Bros. Interactive announces today that Batman: Arkham City will be in stereoscopic 3D in all versions: PS3, Xbox 360 and PC. This means that any display that supports 3D with active-shutter glasses will be compatible w...
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Gears of War 3 to support stereoscopic 3D


Aug 15
// Nick Chester
If you've got a 3D television, hordes of Locusts are gonna be coming right at ya' this September when Gears of War 3 ships. Epic Games has announced that the Xbox 360 exclusive will support stereoscopic 3D. "It's still fledgling technology," executive producer Rod Fergusson told Eurogamer. "It's still a niche feature. But it was something we could support, so we felt, why not?"
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Kingdom Hearts 3D will be playable at Tokyo Game Show


Aug 10
// Dale North
I should cosplay in honor of Kingdom Hearts 3D being playable at next month's Tokyo Game Show. Keyblade, belts and all. No. Not really. Man, if I did that, I'd want to be impaled by a key blade.  Still, I'd like to check...
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MotorStorm game replaces Resistance 3 in PS 3D TV bundle


Aug 05
// Dale North
Remember that PlayStation 3D display that was announced during Sony's press conference at E3 this year? They told us that the 24", $499 set bundle would come with a pair of 3D glasses, an HDMI cable, and a copy of Resistance ...
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Sony: Adding 3D to games costs as low as half a percent


Aug 04
// Dale North
I wouldn't suspect that adding a 3D mode to console games would cost much, but I didn't realize it could be this low. SCEE's senior development manager Simon Benson makes it sound like adding 3D is the cheapest, easiest thing...
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Iwata: Future 3DS titles may not use 3D feature at all


Aug 03
// Dale North
What I love about the Nintendo 3DS is that I have the option of shutting the 3D display off. I like to look at it for a few minutes, but then when it comes to getting into the game, the 3D slider gets pulled down. I'm more in...
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Electronic Arts turns back on 3D gaming


Jul 29
// Jim Sterling
Despite some companies going so far up 3D gaming's arse it would need a rescue team to escape, Electronic Arts isn't impressed. The publisher sees no reason to invest in the concept and will focus its efforts elsewhere. "We s...
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Skyrim director 'couldn't care less' about 3D gaming


Jul 22
// Jim Sterling
Todd Howard, the main man behind The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim has declared that he doesn't give two hoots about 3D technology, despite those who claim it to be the next big thing.  "Honestly, I couldn't care less - having...
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Square Enix: 3D gaming with glasses a huge problem


Jul 21
// Jim Sterling
Publisher Square Enix has claimed that, while glasses-free 3D is a great idea, the ocular requirements that 3D consoles like the PS3 represent a "huge" problem.  "I think 3D without glasses is a win; 3D with glasses is a...
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Ewww: Wii U will support 3D televisions


Jul 07
// Dale North
Got a fancy new 3D television set? I know. No one does. But the Wii U will support 3D sets. Just don't expect 3D games from Nintendo. According to a post on Joystiq, "the Wii U will support 3D televisions but Nintendo itself ...
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Hot Shots Golf: Out of Bounds to get Move, 3D support


Jun 22
// Dale North
One of my most played games ever is the PS3 title Hot Shots Golf: Out of Bounds. It's my go-to game when I'm not really gaming. It's my crack. And now it's getting Move support? Great! Oh, and 3D.  Famitsu says that HSG ...
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Rest easy, Tetris for PSN is now playable in 3D


Jun 14
// Nick Chester
I bought Tetris on PlayStation Network when it launched awhile back. Don't look at me like that, I really like Tetris. Now, Electronic Arts has announced, it's getting a 3D update.  Yes, that's right, the PS3 version of ...
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E3: Hands-on with House of the Dead Overkill Extended Cut


Jun 09
// Conrad Zimmerman
Tara Long and I checked out the upcoming House of the Dead: Overkill Extended Cut, coming soon to PlayStation 3. Sporting a lovely visual upgrade with rather impressive use of 3D and the excellent accuracy of the PlayStation...

E3: Sony's PlayStation 3D TV has some voodoo magic inside

Jun 08 // Dale North
With a simple push, with the glasses on, I could toggle between each player's views, as could anyone else also wearing glasses. Glasses off, the screen just looks like a blurry mess. Sony says that they're working to keep these glasses affordable ($69.99), so no worries there. The set itself is pretty nice. It's a thin LCD with two HDMI ports and one component port. The right rear of the set also has a headphone port. The set has flat speakers on each side. The curved styling may be a little too bold for some, though. The set sits on a small base that would look nice on any desk.   $499 gets you a full spec 3D set: 1080p at 240hz. Add in the glasses, game and made-for-consoles view switching, and this bundle quickly becomes attractive to those wanting to take the 3D gaming plunge.
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Sony showed off a new 3D television at their E3 press conference. I didn't think much of it at first showing, though I'll admit I was a bit more interested when learned of its price point, features and included items. The 24"...

E3: Silent Hill: Downpour is exactly what I wanted

Jun 07 // Dale North
I had a chance to try out Downpour in 3D. Vatra warned that they still have a bit to go with optimizing frame rates and textures, but I felt like the game was already in a good place, even in the alpha stage of development. Some of the depth effects down corridors toward the end of the demo were quite good. When I was running for my life near the end, the 3D really heightened the tension.  The demo took me through the edge area of Toluca Lake as Murphy Pendleton, a guy that was luckily sprung during a transport accident while being transfered to a maximum security penitentiary. The journey takes him into the outskirts of Silent Hill as a convict.  My first goal was to find my way into the city. I came across the now classic broken road, which sent me to an abandoned gas station. I had to find something to use to break a lock on a gate so that I could proceed. A crowbar from a toolbox did the trick, but I was told that rocks and other things from the environment would have also worked. All of this was controlled with pretty standard third-person control -- none of that silly backwards movement from the early Silent Hill games. Later in the demo I worked my way into a building to proceed. Things caught fire with a gas pipe accident after a bit. I pulled the fire alarm to start the sprinklers and that's when things got funky. Stuff started floating, walls started warping, and the world became dark. Water flowed, electrical hazards popped up, and soon I was running for my life. Just when I thought i was safe, some unseen, warped darkness began following me. I had to run down corridors with doors shutting in my face. The tension was really high in this sequence where I knew I was prey. It reminded me of some classic moments from one of my many playthroughs of Silent Hill 2.  Silent Hill: Downpour is technically a survival horror game, but it felt a lot more open to exploration, and definitely more focused on slowly scaring the sh*t out of you later. The tension in the game seemed to rise naturally and gradually, but I was running for my life before I knew it. It looked great, sounded great, felt great, and had some pretty immersive 3D to boot. And again, this is in the alpha stage of development. Things are looking really good for Silent Hill: Downpour already. It's safe to get excited about this one.  
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I'm coming fresh from just having spent some time with Silent Hill: Downpour. I wanted to hurry and write this up while it was still fresh on my mind. I wanted to tell fellow Silent Hill franchise fans that I'm feeling really...

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House of the Dead: Overkill is heading to the PlayStation 3 with full Move, 3D support and Sharp Shooter rifle shell support. The once Wii exclusive is getting majorly overhauled and will feature about 60 percent more content...

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E3: Sony pushes hard to get consumers invested in 3D


Jun 06
// Jonathan Holmes
Sony just announced to new products aimed to get consumers to give 3D gaming, TV, and movies a try. First up is the Playstation 3D monitor -- a 24 inch HD/3D TV that has the added capacity to play local co-op games without th...
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First 3D mobile games on HTC EVO 3D


Jun 01
// Dale North
Sprint has the exclusive on the HTC EVO 3D, so its service will get the first 3D mobile games. This summer the HTC EVO 3D will be our country's first 4G phone. This Android-powered phone comes with a with a 4.3-inch qHD 3D d...
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Gross and probably BS: 3D Xbox 360 rumor for E3


May 23
// Dale North
Gross. Like wash your face with cold water gross. I visited Amsterdam last week and in the red light district I saw a midget woman painted blue, from head to toe. IRL Smurf, folks. This rumor is grosser than that.  The r...

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