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Very Quick Tips: Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

Sep 01 // Chris Carter
General tips: Use night vision often when you're searching for a human target, even if it's daytime. The core reason is because it's hard to see in-game models at times, especially with the dynamic lighting engine. Using night vision will highlight humanoid character models with a bright hue, allowing you to extract them with ease. Always upgrade your Fulton device as soon as you can -- it will help you for core and side ops alike. Pick a favorite weapon, upgrade it constantly, and remember it. You can use the loadout system (similar to Call of Duty) to set your preferred gear. It's easy to get overwhelmed and forget that you're using one of eight rifles, then go into battle with the wrong one. If need be, you can call for entire loadouts to be dropped in mid-mission. Once you get to R&D level 17, buy the flare grenade. It allows you to instantly call chopper support under duress, without having to use your iDroid. Since the game doesn't pause while looking at your device, it can get sticky. When you start Mission #5: Over the Fence, the wolf pup near the first objective marker on the hill is of the utmost importance. He's easy to miss, but if you tranq and Fulton it, he'll grow up to become an entirely new buddy for you to use. You can lock in your crew with the L2 button when assigning Mother Base operations. Use this method to prevent your preferred squads from down-leveling after shifting people around using the auto-sort option. As a general rule it's important to spread the wealth, but favoring R&D for tough missions so you can acquire new tools is never a bad idea. When searching for a target that has a wide circular array on the map, create multiple marks on your iDroid to set your own perimeter. In other words, "draw" bits of the outside of the circle with multiple letters, so you can clear the entire surface area. Marks will automatically erase when you reach them, so you'll know where you've been. Spend your cash upgrading the main stations of Mother Base, first and foremost. Construction takes a long time, but they pay dividends, and you'll want to start working on them as soon as possible. In the same vein, make sure you grab every resource you can on the field to ensure that you can constantly grow Mother Base -- don't just rush past open doors. Go back to the open world often! Fulton everyone you find and actually do those Side Ops. They're not necessarily required, but they'll reward you with tons of new weapons to use in the story, and your backup will be that much more advanced. As a last resort, press triangle while prone. This will bring you into a special "play dead" stealth mode, and you can even avoid being seen if the enemy is right next to you at night. This is especially useful in the "no alert" missions. You can change the type of support called with the R1 menu while using your binoculars. Along with the flare grenade mentioned above, you'll be able to instantly call in your chopper for everything but extraction. It's particularly useful during some boss fights to instantly call in a bombardment after locating an enemy. Play with headphones if possible! Listen for hit songs playing in the background, and follow the noise to the tape. Don't be ashamed of using the chicken hat sometimes if you need it. Some missions will checkpoint you right before a particularly difficult part, and there's no need to bang your head against the wall over and over. In Side Ops #144, the target is laying on the ground in the open in the large base. This one took me forever to find, as I kept going inside, expecting it to be there. Without spoiling anything, to unlock the true ending, you'll need to complete all available main missions after the story seemingly ends abruptly -- yep, all those retread ones with higher difficulties.
Metal Gear Solid V tips photo
Kaz Be Not Proud
Metal Gear Solid V, from a gameplay standpoint, is one of the most complex titles in the series. While it was fairly easy to understand the limited amount of gear you were provided with in past entries (everything was basical...

Metal Gear Solid V photo
Metal Gear Solid V

Kojima leaves P.T. Easter Egg in Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain


R.I.P.
Sep 01
// Vikki Blake
A long time ago, when Hideo Kojima still worked at Konami and the world was ablaze with expectation about an all-new Silent Hill instalment, Kojima treated us to a brief Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain/P.T. cro...
Evolve photo
Evolve

Who wants to try Evolve for free?


PS4 players are exempt, though. Sorry!
Sep 01
// Vikki Blake
If you've been on the fence about shooter, Evolve, here's your chance to try-before-you-buy - developer Turtle Rock Studios is making the game free to play on PC and Xbox One this coming weekend (that's September 4 and 5...
Halo 5: Guardians photo
Halo 5: Guardians

Watch the Halo 5: Guardians opening cinematic


Enough military-speak to sink a fleet
Sep 01
// Joe Parlock
Halo 5: Guardians is on the horizon, and so 343 Industries have given us a peak of the game’s opening cinematic. It’s got your usual Halo stuff: Covenant, people in obsurdly big armour, and lots of holograms. The...

Mad Max photo
Mad Max

All four Mad Max films are on Steam to celebrate the game's release


Fury Road releasing September 21
Sep 01
// Joe Parlock
The Mad Max game comes out today. I’ve been incredibly sceptical of it, seeing as it’s been on frequent big discounts on various websites, so I’m happy to wait for our review before buying it. However, the g...

Review: Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

Aug 31 // Chris Carter
Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain (PC, PS3, PS4 [reviewed], Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: Kojima ProductionsPublisher: KonamiRelease: September 1, 2015Price: $59.99 (PC, PS4, Xbox One) $49.99 (PS3, Xbox 360) [There will be no story spoilers here, though themes and gameplay elements will naturally be discussed in this assessment. I'll be as vague as possible.] Phantom Pain opens up with a brutal playable sequence that sets the tone for the game. Big Boss has woken up after a nine-year coma, and just in time, as an elite infantry unit has invaded his location, ready to kill anyone and everyone just to get to him. Looking back on this opening, it's amazing to see how well thought out everything is in Phantom Pain -- there is very little wasted time. This rapid fire mentality shines throughout the entire game. No longer will you spend hours listening to two portraits talk back and forth via codec. Instead, it's all done through a radio seamlessly integrated into regular play. David Hayter's endless monologues are eschewed for Kiefer Sutherland's more deliberate interjections, and as a result, the entire experience has a very different feel to it. That's not to say there aren't some classic conventions present, or that Kojima has abandoned his roots. There's still plenty of silliness that ensues, crazy mutated boss fights, tons of robots, and Easter eggs for days. It's the gameplay that feels a bit more grounded this time around -- one mission even provided me with flashes of Splinter Cell, but with the obvious Kojima flair to it. The main setup involves a timeline in 1984, 11 years before the first MSX Metal Gear, in which the Soviets invade Afghanistan. Your first job as a newly awakened Big Boss is to rescue your comrade Kazuhira Miller, and begin work on an entirely new Mother Base as the "Diamond Dogs" -- taking on Skull Face and his forces. From here, it evolves into a tale of espionage and deceit, complete with franchise-wide reveals and some breathtaking action sequences. Yep, it's still Metal Gear all right. [embed]305699:60106:0[/embed] But thanks to the advancements Kojima has made over the years refining his craft and the power of the Fox Engine, this is the biggest game yet in just about every regard. To accompany this huge shift is a suitable open-world focus, which allows you to explore a giant portion of Afghanistan, and another region I won't spoil here. It's interesting to see a mainline Metal Gear go this route, but after a few hours, I was used to it. The principle reason I was able to acclimate so quickly is Kojima and his team have made the game fun to play almost at all times. Nearly every situation can either be taken head-on by knocking down the front door, by stealth, or any combination therein. By researching different weapons and tools in Mother Base, you'll have the option to equip hundreds of different loadout variations, and face challenges in completely different ways. For instance, I later came back to one area, took an utterly new route, and used the Fulton extraction system to kidnap an entire base -- one member happened to be a translator who upped my force's efficacy considerably. What's even crazier is how deep the customization goes. You can choose from an assortment of "buddies" (which include the horse and wolf that have been previously revealed, among a few others) to accompany you on missions, all of whom have various costumes and loadouts themselves. You can also choose to alter the appearance of Big Boss, Mother Base, and even your own support Helicopter team. If you enjoyed the prospect of switching up camo suits in Snake Eater, you'll spend hours customizing all your junk here. Mother Base is a whole different animal as well. By using the Fulton system in the field you'll slowly acquire new soldiers, which you can in turn visit at your base at any time. It's similar to the Farmville-esque Garrison system from World of Warcraft, but much more rewarding. While I usually tend to ignore mechanics like this, your crew is integrated into the game in a number of ingenious ways. New weapons rely on the R&D team's efforts, for example, and the Intel team can inform you of incoming weather, as well as nearby enemy patrols if they are sufficiently staffed. The rewards are both tangible and poignant. You can also visit some more important NPCs, partake in a few target practice minigames, hit the shower to wash off the blood of your enemies, and generally just explore the base's nooks and crannies for collectibles. As I touched on a tad, the Fox Engine renders this all beautifully. It's insane to see a portion of the game and realize that it's not a cutscene, but actually done with in-game visuals. Although I've only had access to the PS4 version of Phantom Pain, it's run flawlessly, with minimal load times and no major framerate issues during my time. Another huge thing I noticed was the impeccable sound direction, which may be the best I've ever witnessed in a game to date. It's especially delightful if you're wearing headphones, as you can hear every clomp of your horse as the wind rushes behind you, bullets darting past your head. In terms of my assessment of the plot from start to finish (which all told took me roughly 40 hours to beat), it's definitely not one of my favorite entries, but it does a good job of closing a number of storylines and providing us with a few revelations of its own. As a fan it was tough to forget Hayter at first, but Sutherland really works here, especially with how different Phantom Pain is tonally. Which again, isn't to say that it's all serious all the time, as plenty of absurd characters and storylines pop up fairly quickly. For those of you who are curious, you won't be completely lost if you haven't played previous games in the series, but Snake Eater and Peace Walker knowledge will definitely up your enjoyment of the narrative. But as satisfied as I was with the story, there are a few inherent issues with the way the missions are structured. For starters, a number of levels are uninspired, and force a degree of backtracking, usually for a menial task you've already completed multiple times. This is especially evident later in the game, as it's required to redo some missions with either the "Subsistence," "Extreme," or "Full Stealth" modifiers in tow. The former drops you in with no items or assistance, Extreme ups the amount of damage you take considerably, and the latter ends a mission automatically if you're spotted. Series regulars will probably remember playing a lot of these higher difficulty levels on their third or fourth optional playthrough, but now they're incorporated into the game itself. I have a feeling these objectives are going to be incredibly polarizing, especially since a few of them took me at least 30 tries to complete. It's a level of dedication that hasn't really been seen lately in the gaming arena, but to me, it's classic Kojima. I powered through these tough and sometimes aggravating sections, and was sufficiently rewarded, both in the sense of storyline progression, and the acquisition of completely new tactics. As a note, I couldn't test the online features of the game, including the base-to-base combat sections (FOB). The story calls for at least one scripted invasion, but I was required to play the game in its entirety offline. Once Phantom Pain launches we'll provide some impressions of this feature, and we'll provide a separate review for Metal Gear Online, which has been delayed until October 6. Rest assured, the entire campaign can be played offline, beyond the reach of microtransactions or pre-order bonuses. Despite the fact that I hit a few snags along the way, Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain feels like a simultaneous celebration of the series, and a decidedly new chapter. It's equal parts tough and flashy, and it's fitting that if this is Kojima's last Metal Gear, he goes out on a high note. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher. We did not attend the review event.]
Metal Gear V review photo
Happy trails, Kojima
Despite the fact that most of the spinoff Metal Gear games are good in their own right, they just don't get me excited the same way the mainline console editions do. Every core Metal Gear entry has something new, and offers up some sort of revelatory storyline event that has fans talking for years on end. Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain is no exception.

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Video Review: Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain


Words that kill
Aug 31
// Myles Cox
In case you haven't seen Chris' written review of The Phantom Pain (or you're not fond of reading), I've prepared a relatively* spoiler-free video review of the long-awaited final(?) entry in the Metal Gear Solid series. *All gameplay footage is spoiler-free. All cutscene footage has been shown in previous trailers.
Mad Max review? photo
Mad Max review?

Where is our review for Mad Max?


Soon (tm)
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
It's midnight, and Mad Max has arrived on the PC, PS4, and Xbox One platforms. As you may have noticed, our review isn't up yet. So what gives? Well, we obtained a PS4 copy today. So, as is the case with all of our ...
MGS V photo
MGS V

Metal Gear Solid V's mobile app is rolling out, are you getting Phantom Pain at midnight?


On Android now
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
[Update: Sony is reporting that "some PS4 owners" who pre-ordered digitally will have to wait until 12:00 AM Pacific. This is my reaction.] Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain is launching in just a few hours. Are you g...
Metal Gear Solid V photo
The first hit is free
Having obtained a retail copy of Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, I've had a chance to test out the online functionality a bit, as the servers have been switched on in preparation for the game's midnight launch. You may ...

Shovel Knight photo
Shovel Knight

Nintendo isn't producing the Shovel Knight amiibo (updated with video interview)


Distribution also up to Yacht Club
Aug 31
// Mike Cosimano
At PAX Prime 2015, Yacht Club games "Captain" Sean Velasco told Destructoid that Nintendo isn't actually making the Shovel Knight amiibo. The figure's production and distribution was left in the hands of Yacht Club, which is ...
Bloodborne PVP photo
Bloodborne PVP

Let's see someone top this Bloodborne triple kill


Nobody does it better
Aug 31
// Jordan Devore
Despite not touching Bloodborne in quite a while, the game kept coming up in conversations (some sober, some not) at PAX this past weekend. Kyle and I tried to sell Steven and Brett on it. Zack and I talked at length about ga...
Deadpool photo
Deadpool

Deadpool returns with pricey new PS4 and Xbox One ports


DLC from old platforms included
Aug 31
// Jordan Devore
It was surprising to see High Moon Studios' Deadpool resurface on Steam in July after its removal from digital marketplaces in 2014. The game is no masterpiece, but if someone wants to play, let 'em. I'm glad Activision worke...
New 3DS photo
New 3DS

New 3DS headed to North America in September


Bundled with Animal Crossing stuff
Aug 31
// Jordan Devore
It's been an unnecessarily long wait, but Nintendo is bringing the New 3DS to North America. The handheld with swappable cover plates launches September 25, 2015 in a bundle. For $219.99, the package includes a white New 3DS, Animal Crossing: Happy Home Designer, two cover plates, and a lone amiibo card. You'll have to continue waiting if you don't want those mandatory pack-ins.
Call of Duty photo
Call of Duty

Nuketown reborn in Black Ops 3


But there's a catch
Aug 31
// Robert Summa
If you are a fan of the Nuketown maps in the Call of Duty: Black Ops series, then you'll be happy to hear that Treyarch is bringing the popular map to Black Ops 3. However, this time it's got an edgy name and you'll need to p...

Review: FEIST

Aug 31 // Caitlin Cooke
FEIST (PC)Developer: Bits & BeastsPublisher: FinjiRelease: July 23, 2015MSRP: $14.99 In FEIST you control a small furry creature trying to make its way through a mysterious forest rife with larger, furrier, and angrier beasts who have a penchant for killing and/or capturing your kind. Along the forest path you encounter smaller monsters who, unsurprisingly, are also extremely hell-bent on killing you. The only protection you have is within the environment -- ie grabbing a stick, pinecone, or other forest object to hurl at the creatures, or if that fails then running away. Much of the game consists of learning these monsters’ patterns and using the environment to either avoid or directly confront the problem. Making use of the environment is also critical in progressing throughout the levels -- crates, sticky pine cones, ropes, and rocks are all puzzle mechanics which allow you to move through the game, sometimes while also being ambushed. There is very little direction in how to approach each situation, so often times arriving to the solution involves lots of experimentation and do-overs. For example, leveraging a crate as a shield against a dart-throwing centipede and pushing other monsters into the fray is a common tactic to avoid death. Nothing is randomized, even the behaviors of enemies are predictable, however FEIST manages to make each level extremely difficult by throwing a lot at the player. The encounters are sometimes clustered and can escalate quickly if not approached in the right manner. There aren’t any power ups in the game so relying on your platforming skills and muscle memory is key. In other words, FEIST is not a game where you have time to pause and think of what the solution is -- it’s best to run through, burn out, and repeat what you’ve learned from your death. I find that because of this premise, FEIST teeters on the edge of being almost too demanding. If you’re not able to master these precise movements and quick reactions, the game can become frustrating fairly quickly. The first couple of chapters through the forest were intriguing, latching onto more of a puzzle-solving nature, but sadly as I progressed I found the mechanics and monsters to be repetitive and annoying. The visuals are simple but captivating, displaying a bright and sunny environment beyond the veil of the dark forest -- a constant reminder that you’re trapped. The music is also entrancing, matching the ambience of the game and sometimes even providing a sense of calm in the chaos. I did find myself hoping for more setting to accompany the strife of actually making it through the levels -- as FEIST only has a loose story that wasn’t entirely clear, or interesting for that matter. Unfortunately, FEIST also suffers from a number of other issues. For a game that demands so much precision, so much is left out of the player’s hands. In many situations monsters have a hive mentality or tossing mechanism which essentially throws the player back and forth, making it useless to combat. It’s also impossible to tell how many hits you can reasonably take, as there is no health bar yet many ways you can get hurt to varying degrees. It’s also unclear when, or if, the game is saving your state. When dying, it brings you back to the beginning of the scenario as expected, however when exiting the game there is no clear indication of where you will begin when re-entering. At one point, I had spent an arduous amount of time getting through a level only to find that when I picked the game back up the next day, it had erased my progress and placed me back at the beginning of the chapter. Despite it drawing similarities from Limbo and other games in the genre, FEIST manages to separate itself and make the experience its own through dynamic gameplay and an emergent environment. However, that experience is a brutal one, and something that is extremely hard to swallow. Although its premise was simple and delightful at first, playing through FEIST was a trying experience and one that I would not want to repeat. Others who have a penchant for unforgiving games like the Souls series may find joy here, and if you’re looking for something more thoughtful or forgiving, keep walking.
FEIST Review photo
Masochism at its finest
FEIST is at first glance very reminiscent of Limbo, checking all the boxes in terms of its dark visuals, lonely atmosphere, eerie music -- it even has the same creepy, hanging crates and doom spiders. Despite the similarities...

X-COM photo
X-COM

ESRB rates X-COM: Enemy Unknown Plus for Vita


Zuh
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
An ESRB rating has popped up for X-COM: Enemy Unknown Plus, which is being listed as a Mature game for the PlayStation Vita. It's important to note that the listing is for "Unknown," which is the base game, and not the "Withi...
Pokemon Shuffle photo
Pokemon Shuffle

Pokemon Shuffle is hitting iOS today in the west


Much better suited for mobile
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
If you haven't tried Pokemon Shuffle yet, now's your chance -- it's hitting iOS today in North America and Europe. It was always better suited as a mobile game anyway, one that you could always have on your person no mat...
Street Fighter V photo
Street Fighter V

Capcom details Street Fighter V pre-order bonuses, Collector's Edition


So many CEs today!
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
Today is just the day to unveil Collector's Editions, guys. Capcom is the latest to join the craze, with details for Street Fighter V. It'll come with the game, a 10-inch "fully painted" Ryu statue, a 48-page hardco...
Uncharted 4 photo
Uncharted 4

Uncharted 4: A Thief's End will be released on March 18, DLC detailed


A Collector's Edition, too
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
Uncharted 4: A Thief's End, which I really hope is better than the disappointing Uncharted 3, will be released on March 18, 2016, on PS4. Collector's ($119.99), Special ($79.99), and Digital Deluxe ($79.99) editions have been...
Jackbox photo
Jackbox

Hey, a Jackbox Party Pack sequel just got announced


Focus on streaming and Fibbage 2
Aug 31
// Laura Kate Dale
In the world of party-based video games, you're really missing out if you haven't given the Jackbox Party Pack a go yet. The collection of five games, all controlled using Internet-connected devices like phones, tablets, or h...
King's Quest photo
King's Quest

King's Quest's second episode will be out 'soon'


Love this game
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
Back in July, the first episode for the new King's Quest series was released, and it was pretty fantastic. The second episode has been revealed as "Rubble Without a Cause," and will heavily feature the goblin horde. Rub...
Tropes vs. Women photo
Tropes vs. Women

New Tropes vs. Women episode deals with 'Women as Reward'


Kicking off with Metroid
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
A new episode of Tropes vs. Women is out today, involving "Women as a Reward." The start heavily references Metroid before working its way into some other retro titles like Double Dragon, and modern games like Ride to Hell: ...
Mega Man photo
Mega Man

Archie's Mega Man series is getting another massive compilation


'Master Edition'
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
Archie has already been putting out collections of several issues of the Mega Man comic, but according to a new listing, it looks like this compilation series will be collections of those collections -- comic-ception, if...
Microsoft photo
Microsoft

Microsoft unveils new Xbox One Elite bundle, exclusive GameStop controller


$499 and $64.99 respectively
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
Microsoft has announced the new Xbox One Elite Bundle, which will come with a 1TB Solid State Hybrid Drive and an Xbox Elite Wireless controller. It's priced at $499, on sale in November at GameStop and the Microsoft Store. W...

Review: Satellite Reign

Aug 31 // Josh Tolentino
Satellite Reign (PC)Developer: 5 Lives StudiosPublisher: 5 Lives StudiosReleased: August 28, 2015MSRP: $29.99Reviewer's Rig: Intel Core i5 3.40Ghz, Nvidia Geforce GTX 780 Ti, 8GB RAM I mentioned the discrepancy between my memory of what Syndicate was and the fact of how it actually played, and Satellite Reign's existence makes that difference all the more apparent. That's because, despite the latter game's obvious tonal and thematic debt to Syndicate, it's a closer cousin, mechanically speaking, to Firaxis' XCOM: Enemy Unknown.  Whereas Syndicate and Syndicate Wars had you controlling a squad of roughly identical agents, each distinguished mainly by the weapons you had them carry, the corporate wetworks team you run in Satellite Reign's consists of four distinct character classes; each class has unique abilities unlocked through the leveling system, as well as individualized ways of dealing with the obstacles in their way. Soldiers can attract and resist enemy fire or hardwire enemy power generators to turn off turrets, doors, and cameras. Hackers can shut down security systems, use drones, and "hijack" enemy and civilian NPCs to puppet as they please, a la Syndicate's Persuadertron. Support agents heal their comrades and can use a "World Scan" ability to trace systems and find suitable hacking targets. Infiltrators can use ziplines, vents, and cloaking devices to sneak past guards while packing powerful melee and sniper attacks.   [embed]307082:60210:0[/embed] This class system, in addition to the game's requisite suite of cybernetic augmentations, weapons, and equipment, as well as an XCOM-like cover system, makes every encounter and excursion in Satellite Reign a far more involved affair than in its inspiration. Whereas those older encounters usually boiled down to how quickly your guys could mow down theirs, here, every member can work in concert, their abilities complementing each other to lay even the toughest defenses bare. Evasion, subterfuge and pitched combat all have their place, and can happen at virtually any time on the game's open map. That open map is another way 5 Lives stands apart from its peers and inspirations. Instead of missions, whether bespoke like in Syndicate or procedurally-generated like in XCOM, Satellite Reign opts for an open-world structure set on what the developers claim is one of the largest maps ever generated for the Unity Engine. The map is that of a city owned and run by Dracogenics, a massive future megacorporation propped up by selling "Res-tech", a cloning technology not unlike that seen in The Sixth Day. Your team, part of a rival corporation, is dropped into the city with an older, pirated version of Res-tech (their explanation for respawning), and tasked with overthrowing Dracogenics' monopoly in the name of business, no matter how much murder and robbery it takes to do so. Everything happens on the map, as your agents claw their way through the city, with nary a loading screen between tasks. Each district, from neon-soaked Downtown to the smog-choked Industrial zone, houses a number of side missions designed to reduce Dracogenics' control. For example, infiltrating the local police station can lengthen the time it takes for guards to call in reinforcements, while planting bugs in a surveillance center keeps security cameras from recognizing your agents too quickly. Breaking into the district bank can increase the speed at which ATMs funnel cash into your coffers. Bribing a disgruntled sanitation worker can unlock a side entrance into a heavily-guarded military base. Locating a conveniently hung power line might give your agents a quick way over the walls, but only if your Soldier can sabotage a nearby generator to keep that line from frying anyone trying to slide down it. It all feels interconnected and detailed in the manner of the best obstacle courses and levels. Through it all your agents will be getting their hands on new gear, unlocking new abilities, and getting more formidable, as the game's structure allows for a near total freedom of approach. Virtually every scenario can be handled in the way you choose (short of peaceful negotiation), limited only by your ability to coordinate your agents and their own equipment and abilities. Every upgrade makes you feel more powerful, but not just in a simple "numbers went up" sense, but in the way that new upgrades unlock new options and ways to break past barriers that limited you before. Unfortunately, like a proper cyberpunk story, Satellite Reign's shiny, polished exterior reveals some grit and ugliness upon close examination. Civilians walk aimlessly to and fro, only there to provide a source of fresh clones for your agents and inconvenient witnesses for their crimes. The open-world structure of the game excises the possibility of truly lasting consequence, with the world, guard patterns, and even destroyed cameras eventually resetting over time. Enemies are a touch too durable as well, their multiple layers of armor, health, and energy shielding limiting certain approaches, and turning most firefights into drawn-out affairs as enemies summon reinforcements faster than you can kill them. Perhaps the most disappointing thing about this otherwise brilliantly-executed game is how hollow its world feels. Despite the gorgeously rendered city visuals and a goodly amount of text to be found by digging through random data terminals, Satellite Reign's city feel less like a world than a cyberpunk-themed playset. You direct your little squad of action figures around and play as you like, but rarely feel lost or immersed in the setting. It would be churlish and greedy to demand storytelling on the level of, say, Deus Ex from the game when it already does everything else so well, but it's saying something when Syndicate still manages to establish a better mood despite being nearly twenty-two years older. At the same time, rough edges like that are a small price to pay when Satellite Reign does Syndicate better than Syndicate ever did.  [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.] [embed]307082:60210:0[/embed]
Satellite Reign Review photo
Guerilla Startup
I can still remember the first time I played Syndicate. It was after school in late 1993, and I was messing around on an office computer while waiting for my mother to finish a meeting and take me home. I remember the cool mi...

VR photo
VR

We tried the HTC Vive and had a chat about comfort in VR


Cloudhead Games showed us The Gallery
Aug 31
// Myles Cox
The dawn of ubiquitous consumer virtual reality is nearly upon us, and there are still some questions left unanswered. While Oculus may have led the monopoly in the VR game for a few years, multiple VR solutions have started ...
Destiny photo
Destiny

Oh for goodness sake, Destiny's Taken King raid won't be in at launch


Bungie...
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
When the last Destiny expansion hit, we got the recycled, poor excuse for endgame content -- the Prison of Elders -- instead of a real raid. Bungie claimed that a raid would be "coming later," leading many to believ...
Cave shmups photo
Cave shmups

Cave shmups are coming to Steam this year


Published by Degica
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
An ominous teaser site has popped up on the web, titled caveshmups.com. According to the landing, publisher Degica will assist Cave in bringing iconic shooters to the Steam marketplace, which will go down sometime in winter o...
Deus Ex: Mankind Divided photo
Deus Ex: Mankind Divided

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided dated, with a whole mess of pre-order nonsense


'Augment your pre-order,' haha
Aug 31
// Chris Carter
Square Enix and Ubisoft sure know how to do a terrible mean Collector's Edition! Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will launch on February 23, 2016, and with it, multiple "tiers" of pre-order bonuses and a Collector's Edition tha...

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