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Is classic Survival Horror considered old fashioned now?

Oct 15 // Dale North
[embed]282542:55979:0[/embed] Survival horror games aren't that old. I did enjoy several of the early graphical adventures that had scary themes. Clicking around haunted houses wasn't nearly as interactive as, say, Resident Evil, but the chance for creepiness was still there and that was worthy of a play for this thrill seeker. Alone in the Dark still holds up, I'd say. Back in the PlayStation/Saturn era, the genre was still shaping up. Resident Evil got us rolling, Silent Hill started a sick craving, and games like Clock Tower and D served as a sort of bridge between games that gave us the creeps and ones that would actually make us jump out of our seats. The scares were there, but some of the stronger hooks that were soon to draw so many fans in were still budding. When we really got going, back in the early 2000s, you could find legitimate scares in games. I look back at those times fondly. Between the prior console generation's titles I missed and the new ones coming out, I had a steady IV drip of freaky experiences to work through. I played them all, too. The big ones like Clock Tower and Resident Evil weren't any more important to me than the less popular ones, like Dreamcast games Carrier and the not-so-hot Blue Stinger. Remember Haunting Ground? Rule of Rose? Both the Fatal Frame and Silent Hill franchises had my heart. And, oh man, Siren.  [embed]282542:55980:0[/embed] Recent talk about how survival horror is dying and giving way to scary action games scares me. Yes, tastes change, gamers change, and sales results speak. But I'd love to believe that there's a number of fans out there that still crave checking fifty doors to eventually find that one that has gruel-covered, multi-limbed baddies behind it. I'd love to believe that there is a group of fans that think that we need to get back to basics. That being helplessly lost in the fog is a million times better than shooting aliens with an overgrown nail gun.  I blame Resident Evil 4. But before you come after me with your "muerte" chants and sharp implements, know that I love this game as much as you do. I don't need to tell you how well it balanced the scares and combat equally, or how it launched a thousand memes. Hell of a game. But the problem was that it sold so well that Capcom began chasing sales numbers over scares. And then, like a flashlight flipped on in the dark, all the other game-making ghouls came out for a juicy hunk of their own. The genre hasn't been the same since. I'm not out to write the same piece Jim Sterling shared some years back as he did a fine job then. But has the situation continued to decline since then? Fatal Frame—the first game—hasn't aged well, I've just found. Neither have its early sequels, actually. Not on a technical level. Not to this games professional that has spent most of the last year with his face in shiny, polished, high-definition games. But nostalgia goes a long way, as do dark, gritty textures. The low-res murk of the earlier survival games are my puffy Nintendo clouds and dancing trees. Good feels. Great memories.  So I've been screaming at night this past week during my replaying of these games, waiting for The Evil Within to come out. I'm usually playing late at night when everything is quiet and dark. It doesn't matter that these games are old and haven't aged well or that I've played them many times before. I'm still quietly giggling at myself when I get wrapped up in exploring the too-dark hallways or when the echo-y sound effects catch me off guard. I've wondered on several occasions this past week if I'm going to enjoy The Evil Within as much as I'm enjoying replaying these old PS2 games.  You can blame the market, or lazy developers, or disconnected management, but we've also changed. It feels like gamers are less open to being freaked out these days. I guess it's hard to ask players to come off their super powers, air strikes, and unlimited ammo and start playing something where your only defense is a camera. Or running away. I felt like the only person who liked Silent Hill: Shattered Memories back in 2009. While I was singing its praises, others were downplaying it for having no combat, or worse, for being on the Wii. Who cares?! I have fond memories of sweating, running (virtually) scared for my life. For me, that makes for an outstanding survival horror. I feel like a few bad eggs have people writing off modern-day horror games. Not-scary games, or scary-for-the-wrong-reasons re-releases. Resident Evil 5 was one of the biggest disappointments of the genre for me. Fun game? I guess. But not even close to scary. Nothing's scary about a co-op buddyfest. And that probably bummed out a lot of fellow survival horror fans off expecting another Resident Evil 4. But this doesn't make Silent Hill: Homecoming a bad game, does it? Amnesia: The Dark Descent is still brilliant, right?  It's a mindset thing, too. That inverted movement system from the older top-down games would be called broken or at least cumbersome by today's gamer. For me, the challenging movement added to the tension. And it's the same for the slushy and slow combat systems of some of the PS2 survival horror games. Some may have hated it. I thought that it made perfect sense that these grotesque horrors from the underworld would be that difficult to take down. That low-res grit? That's an asset, not a tech problem!  I sometimes worry that our reviews and feedback from those old games we loved served as nails in the classic survival horror games coffin. Aside from the change in focus or mechanics, maybe it's just  that current-day horror games are less scary. There are lots of reasons why, too. Remember how every room in Fatal Frame 2 had its own camera angle? What you couldn't see made you just as nervous as any monster would. It just felt lovingly crafted. Regardless of how you felt about Silent Hill 4: The Room, you had to at least give it that they went above and beyond in making it feel really fucked up. Even now, this many years later, that game had some of the most disturbing imagery I've seen in a game.  [embed]282542:55981:0[/embed] There was a nice bunch of independent horror games that hit recently that give this old-fashioned gamer hope. Outlast and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs filled voids that those action-y games didn't. Even Slender did something for me. This year hasn't been the worst. If Alien: Isolation doesn't make you feel like you're going to piss yourself, I don't know what will. The jury is mixed on brand new Mikami release The Evil Within (review coming soon!), but it's something, right? But I'm holding out for something a lot like the survival horror classics. The next Silent Hill 2, if you will. Something with the spirit of Fatal Frame 2. Something that's not scared to go weaponless/powerless. Maybe we can revisit Japanese horror a bit more. How about way less action and way more fucked-up storylines about horrible orphanages. Try an openness to there being gamers out there who loved walking down a seemingly endless staircase for five minutes. Have some faith, game makers. Ditch the guns and the HUDs. Get with the wiggly mannequins.  [embed]282542:55978:0[/embed] Don't let me down, P.T. I got more out of that "interactive trailer" than I have with any other full horror game as of late. Until then, I'll go on with the late night replays of all of my favorites, continuing to milk them for all their scares until another good fix comes along. It's less about being stuck in the past and more about just needing more of what I love so much. Scare me, someone. Please.
Is Survival Horror dead? photo
Not scary anymore
I like to be scared. I'm not some kind of dark-obsessed weirdo, though. I just really enjoy the feeling of being tense or terrified, so much so that I used to think that there was something wrong with me. Maybe there is. A fe...

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Yeah, so that Tears to Tiara II review...


...
Oct 15
// Dale North
PS3 RPG Tears to Tiara II came out...yesterday. So, where is the review?  [cringe] That's my fault. It's busy season here at Destructoid, so I'm wrapped up with multiple reviews as of late. It's nowhere near Chris Carte...
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It looks like Sony will be launching an official eSports league


Starting in Spain, with other countries soon
Oct 15
// Dale North
Spanish site Gamereactor has details on what looks to be an official PlayStation League for eSports on the PS4. The PlayStation Official League initiative was created in Spain, with other countries following. The report says ...
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Here's what the Persona Q Premium and Limited editions will look like


I need!
Oct 15
// Dale North
The Velvet Room theme song started playing in my head as I began writing this news blurb this morning. Igor and friends would be glad to know that after all of these years (and games) that the song stuck. It's in there for go...
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Watch Vine on Xbox One starting today


Six seconds at a time
Oct 14
// Dale North
I almost made a Vine about Vine being on Xbox One. I was thinking about using Bruh or something, but ultimately decided against it.  I'm disgustingly addicted to Vine. Ask Brett Makedonski or anyone that has traveled wi...
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Atelier Escha & Logy Plus coming to PS Vita in Japan


Maybe us later, please?
Oct 14
// Dale North
Yes, this is another one of those "...in Japan" kind of posts, but Atelier Escha & Logy: Alchemists of the Dusk Sky is a fine video game, and an RPG coming to Vita is fine news. Uh, and while we're at it, my sinceres...
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Resident Evil: Revelations 2 release date is Feb. 17, says PS Store [Update]


Maybe
Oct 14
// Dale North
[Update: The official Resident Evil Twitter calls the date a placeholder and says that the true release date is still unconfirmed.] Are these things usually wrong? Wait, don't answer that. But the PlayStation Store is at leas...
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BRRUUAAAPPHH!


Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures 2
Oct 14
// Dale North
It's probably the 12-year-old in me that digs this new commercial for PAC-MAN and the Ghostly Adventures 2. Burping with force waves? Cool. Sound effect stand-ins for farts? Love it. The scream-y Ask Ketchum/Naruto voice over narrator? Tops, man.  Not going to lie: I've watched this more than once. I'm also pretty proud of my screenshot of the boy belching.
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Tales of Hearts R works just fine with PlayStation TV


Kick back
Oct 14
// Dale North
Vita game Tales of Hearts R works with PS TV, says Bandai Namco. This means you can enjoy the portable title on your larger TV screen.  Duh, you say? PS TV has what are basically the Vita's innards, and it is compatible ...
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WayForward and Amazon Game Studios team up on Til Morning's Light


Touch-based action adventure for Fire phone
Oct 14
// Dale North
Til Morning's Light was developed by WayForward in cooperation with Amazon Game Studios, and it's coming exclusively to the Fire phone.  So far we know that Til Morning's Light is set in a haunted New England mansion th...
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Show-off


Oct 13
// Dale North
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Zone Runners: Sonic-themed hip hop


This exists
Oct 13
// Dale North
Sonic-themed hip hop exists. Check out Zone Runners, a game music-inspired hip hop trio that just released their debut album of Sonic the Hedgehog type tunes. They run through a number of zones over the 11-track release, with...
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Test your might with the first 4K Ultra HD benchmark from 3DMark


Good luck!
Oct 13
// Dale North
You know that hammer carnival game where you hit the base as hard as you can to test your strength? I feel like every benchmark I try is like that. I hit it with all my might (new hardware, OS tweaks, etc.) and the damned thi...
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Bandai Namco announces Battleline: Steel Warfare


Upcoming PC free-to-play tank game
Oct 13
// Dale North
Check out the newest from Namco Bandai and Creant Studios, a free-to-play PC tank game called Battleline: Steel Warfare. It's coming to PC later this year, with a closed beta launching next month. If you want to get in on th...
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Sega fans, you should be watching the SeHa Girls anime


Dreamcast, Saturn, and Megadrive go to school
Oct 13
// Dale North
The first episode of the new Sega-themed anime Hi*sCool! SeHa Girls has launched. As a diehard Sega fan, and a gamer that still uses his Sega consoles, I watched this adaptation of a ridiculous light novel weekend and loved ...
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PlayStation Experience Event takes place in December in Las Vegas


You're invited
Oct 10
// Dale North
The very first PlayStation Experience will take place in Las Vegas on December 6 and 7. This is a community event that Sony says that they've been planning for awhile. A community event! Not some stuffy press event! Yes. It w...
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Disney Fantasia Music Evolved demo is out


Try it out!
Oct 10
// Dale North
I believe that Harmonix's Disney Fantasia Music Evolved is one of those games you'll have to experience for yourself to really get. You can read our previews and get some idea of how it made us feel, but I really think that t...
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Look at this super skinny gaming rig from PiixL, two inches thick


Straps to the back of your TV
Oct 10
// Dale North
I've hid my gaming/media PC rig behind or under my television for years. It's much easier these days with all of the small form factor boxes available.  But I don't care how lovely they make these things; I'm still hidin...
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Get hype with this Japanese PS4 title lineup video


BIIGU TIETORU!
Oct 09
// Dale North
This new Japanese PlayStation 4 commercial shows off a lot of the upcoming games. You might be excited about some of them. Watching it, I was like: yes. Yep. Oh yeah. Yep, that too. Uh-huh. They lost me a bit with a couple o...

The game trailers with the most feels

Oct 09 // Dale North
[embed]282327:55914:0[/embed] The Last Guardian It was at Tokyo Game Show -- I know that. Was it 2009? 2010? Whatever. I remember this clearly: what felt like a floor-to-ceiling display played the debut trailer. Full-blast sound, brilliant color. It stopped me in my tracks. I instantly fell in love with the dog/bird thing. This one. This super cute, cheery one. But the E3 one. Oh, wow. Even now, something about this trailer makes my heart rate slow. I breathe deeper. It's quite a bit more emotional than the TGS one. It makes you feel something. The final shots gave me goosebumps, even today as I put this piece together. The spears in its back get me every time. This game is going to fuck me up if it ever comes out.    [embed]282327:55915:0[/embed] Final Fantasy Tactics When did we first see this? I don't remember. Was it a bonus trailer on a disc? Something like that. Anyway, I watched it hundreds of times. It had me from the spinning crystal and that adaptation of the Final Fantasy "Crystal Theme." The music picks up quickly and then the "The Lion War!" text pops up, hammering in the hype. Then, that phased chorus brings us back into the Crystal Theme. Short, sweet, perfect.  This trailer sold me on the game. 100% effective.   [embed]282327:55917:0[/embed] Metal Gear Solid 2 Prediction: you forgot how great this trailer was. You're completely gone from three seconds in, thanks to that haunting vocal.  What's amazing about this trailer is that the hype holds for over nine minutes, all the way through to the majestic wall-of-strings theme ending. It doesn't let go. I think trailers these days are mostly shit. This is how you do a videogame trailer.    [embed]282327:55918:0[/embed] Dead Island This Dead Island trailer did nothing for me. Maybe I have no soul. Maybe I saw the future and knew we'd be tired of zombies. But there is no way that I would leave it off this list as it resonated with so many. Destructoid's staff was extremely vocal about it needing to be in this article. So here it is. Have you seen it reversed?   [embed]282327:55922:0[/embed] Gears of War The "Mad World" ad for Gears of War proved so popular that the song from it hit #1 on the iTunes charts soon after its release. Microsoft and Epic were surprised at how effective the ad was. The song really made the whole thing. It's amazing what a song can do.   [embed]282327:55923:0[/embed] Dead Space Speaking of songs, "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star" was never as fucked up as it was in that early Dead Space trailer. Wow, that was some dark shit, right? The original words and that very end where the singer's voice wavers really make this one stick in your head.   [embed]282327:55929:0[/embed] Silent Hill 4: The Room I felt darkness wash over me the first time I saw the debut trailer for Silent Hill 4: The Room. Testing today, it still works on me.  The moaning and hazy imagery still freak me out. That floating with the shadow? Holy fuck! Yikes! This was an all-new kind of dark for the franchise. The trailer accurately conveyed the game's feelings of solitude and confusion. I loved you so much back then, Konami.    [embed]282327:55927:0[/embed] Smash Bros. Brawl Though the new one is no slouch, the Smash Bros. Brawl trailer from E3 2006 was super-powered original steam engine on the hype train. When that choir kicks in you feel it in your bones. That shot of Mario with his hands out, shaking his head in a power-fueled rage? I do the same thing when watching this trailer. This is a work of art.   [embed]282327:55916:0[/embed] Kingdom Hearts The king of them all. In my eyes, this is the pinnacle of game trailers that make you feel something. Today, even after all of these years, after pressing play on the video to verify it was the right one, goosebumps started at my toes and went to the very top of my head. My eyes watered up. What the hell is wrong with me?
Trailers with feels photo
A round-up of the best
I'm easy. And I think you are, too. Those debut game trailers get me every time. It usually goes like this: Stirring, slow beds of strings and woodwinds underlay a dramatic shot; an extreme closeup of some unknown character. ...

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Rakuen's first trailer is so sweet


Laura Shigahara's upcoming game
Oct 09
// Dale North
Laura Shigihara, composer and musician behind the Plants vs. Zomies and To The Moon soundtracks, has her own game coming up. She describes Rakuen as a mix between Maniac Mansion, The Legend of Zelda: Link...
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Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series hints 'Ironwoods'


Ironwoods
Oct 09
// Dale North
Look at this brand new tweet from Telltale Games. Ironwoods, eh? What does that mean for their upcoming Game of Thrones game? Well, besides hard trees. And how does it relate to the earlier Forrester hint they dropped awhile back?
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These 8- and 16-bit EWI videogame remixes are outstanding


Super Scope!
Oct 08
// Dale North
EWI is a wind controller, or an Electronic Wind Instrument. Basically, it's a synthesizer you blow into, allowing players of acoustic wind instruments to get into the digital music world. It looks kind of like a clarinet or ...
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Reminder: Hatsune Miku to appear on The Late Show with David Letterman tonight


I can't even
Oct 08
// Dale North
This will never fully compute. I doubt that it'll make sense in my head while it's airing, even.  Vocaloid's Hatsune Miku, the voice synthesizer turned popular character, will be performing live on The Late Show with David Letterman at 11:35 p.m. Eastern Time. As a hologram. Right alongside Anderson Cooper and Gina Rodriguez.  Is this world really real?
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Xbox Live has a dedicated weather news app now


WeatherNation launches
Oct 08
// Dale North
Xbox Live does just about everything, now including streaming weather news. WeatherNation has launched for the Xbox 360, bringing 24/7 streaming weather news to users, straight from their television network. It will also feat...
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I'm a sucker for a good Kingdom Hearts trailer: HD 2.5 ReMIX


Sparkles and chimes
Oct 08
// Dale North
That very first trailer for the first Kingdom Hearts game killed me. I still remember that first viewing, being completely overcome with goosebumps and trying to hide that I was tearing up. Moving? Oh man. Yes. I still love ...
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Nindies at IndieCade. Wait, Nindies? I love you, Nintendo


New Nintendo indies to be shown at IndieCade
Oct 08
// Dale North
The list of new Nintendo independent games to be shown at IndieCade that we received this morning? Great. Great news. But I'm more hung up on the title of the press email that Nintendo sent out: Nintendo Showcases Prolific &...
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Link: Open letter to Microsoft, Turn 10, Playground Games on DLC


Nice work, Cheapy D
Oct 07
// Dale North
Forza Horizon 2? Pretty damned good, right? Having to buy a car pack to get the most desired DLC car? Not so good. I have strong feelings of my own on that and other DLC topics surrounding the Forza franchise, but I can save ...

Review: Driveclub

Oct 07 // Dale North
Driveclub (PS4)Developer: Evolution StudiosPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: October 7, 2014MSRP: $59.99 Evolution Studios, the folks behind the MotorStorm games, wanted to create a racer where everyone would play together in one big racing hangout. Driveclub is that. Its strongest point is that it is smartly networked so that even single-player events' scores and times are automatically compared to your friends' results, making for instant competition fuel. Leaderboards exist for nearly every trackable aspect of Driveclub, and the game's Social Hub keeps you up to date on yours and others' stats. Being online also adds pop-up challenges to just about every race. The connective-ness of it all really does have it feeling like a big, digital hangout.  And then there's the actual club aspect of the game, which lets you team up with five friends to work through the game as a group. Your successes benefit the rest of the team along the way, with points going to each member for taking on challenges. When you earn new rides or access, your club members do, too.  Driveclub has a single-player mode that branches into single races and a full career mode, and a multiplayer mode that relies heavily on the social system. All of these modes will eventually put you into about four dozen of the hottest cars and just as many tracks, based on locations around the world. With its challenges and face-offs, slick environmental system, strong course visuals, and constant online connectivity, it always feels like there's something to do or see. But when you boil it down, you're only really taking on three race types in Driveclub: time trials, standard races, and drifting challenges -- a pretty short list. There's nothing like rally or snow racing to mix things up. That all said, even after a couple of weeks of play, I have yet to grow bored of the racing. I suppose this is a testament to the strength of Driveclub's connectivity and social features. For as big as it is, there's a refreshing core that makes Driveclub incredibly accessible. You simply get in the car and drive; there's nothing in the way of tuning or customization, save for a few color/coat options. In fact, outside of Auto/Manual transmission selection, there isn't anything you can change. Everyone is on the same page. Those that like the tinker under the hood may be disappointed at how locked down Driveclub is, but I'd bet that the majority of those that will play the game wouldn't bother if the option did exist. That's not to say that you can't change any options.  Driveclub has six camera views to choose from, all of which have their uses. There are two third-person views, a clean first-person view, a hood view, and two interior views. The two in-car views (cockpit and hood/partial dashboard) are among the best I've ever seen in a racing game. Both sport slick reflective modeling on the windshield, making the view impressively realistic. Under bright light the reflection is sometimes a bit too strong, though. And I wish the height of the behind-glass hood view was a tad bit higher.  The single-player tour has you on the path Evolution has picked, in the cars they've chosen, racing on the the track they've set up. In other words, this is a pretty straightforward career mode. While it branches out a bit with more event types after a few events have been completed, you're still basically on the course they've set. Each of the events has its own requirements, which, when completed successfully, earns you a star. Subsequent event groups are unlocked at set star levels.  Aside from stars, every event and challenge earns you Fame points. These points are at the heart of the game's leveling system, allowing you to unlock more of the game as you play. The better you play, the more points you earn. In classic form, you'll race, eventually place, and then earn new cars and tracks with these points. Club activities also earn you points. Multiplayer has a few different faces in Driveclub. Asynchronous functionality lets you send your just-completed races as challenges, essentially copying your exact race for others to go up against when they're ready to. They've made it really easy to issue a challenge, making for nearly endless competitive play. Conversely, the social system lets you browse others' accomplishments and tackle them as you please. It's kind of like picking a fight. Of course, there's also live multiplayer races to take part in. Driveclub digs through your friends list and tells you who is playing, making matches very easy to put together. The game does a nice job of keeping what's going on in your face at all times, again, making you feel like you're hanging out in a big racing event with everyone else.  The panel-based menu system that lets you do all of this is sufficient, but I wouldn't call it elegant. Sometimes you'll find yourself in a menu loop when trying to find how to accomplish a task, especially on the social side. To be fair, there's a lot of information to be presented. But it would be nice to, say, be able to sort through the list of friends' results by race type. The system could use a bit more polish. There are some bugs, too. I ran into plenty of errors and stalls while trying to join or create multiplayer sessions. Hopefully these will be ironed out in patch releases. The driving feel of Driveclub rides a pretty confident line between simulation and arcade racing, which is impressive to this fan of both sides of racing games. I immediately grinned at the super-assisted cornering and braking as I barreled into my first corner at too-fast speeds without consequence. This means that those just looking for some casual fun will have no problems here. But, unlike some of the more casual arcade racers, Driveclub is respectably responsive and seems to have some solid physics foundations under the hood. This all means that you can approach things like drafting and cornering by the book, or you can just go nuts with the drifting and sliding. You can't please everyone, but this racing fan was mostly satisfied. I found myself completely in the zone when it came to time attacks and other driving challenges, as Driveclub's feel is very easy to get into. But I was literally knocked out of the zone by the constant AI car bashing. This is my biggest problem with Driveclub -- the constant crashing from the single-player AI cars.  Yes, avoiding collisions is a part of racing, but there were too many instances during my time with Driveclub where they felt unavoidable. Pretty much every single race I took part in had me playing what felt like bumper cars with AI cars in some way. At best, I'd get an unfair bump off the road by a passing car during the last stretch of the last lap of a race, knocking me off the road, taking my chances of a podium finish off the table. At worst, AI cars would ram me from behind, smashing me into a wall, making the time spent racing up until that point fully wasted. There have been several instances of an unexpected, unwarranted AI car crash resulting in me earning a collision or cornering penalty. Imagine having your car temporarily throttled for something you didn't do. That's not fun at all. Constant, senseless crashing made Driveclub's single-player tour mode feel like being stuck in the worst version of online racing at times. Crashing is a part of racing -- sure. But the frequency in this case is highly frustrating, so much so that having to take on any challenge against other cars really started to feel like a chore. Thankfully, after unlocking cars and courses, you can play Driveclub against real people and not have to worry about the crashy AI. If you're not fully leveled up, the game will loan you cars until you are. Even with as much as I dislike the constant crashing in the tour mode, Driveclub still has legs with the wealth of multiplayer and challenge options.  It helps that Driveclub is very nice to look at. The cars models are highly detailed and very easy on the eyes. But the courses take the cake here. The beauty of the sun beams flooding the spaces between the trees in the surrounding forests are almost distracting in one course. Snowy mountain passes, dirty back roads, lakeside drives -- all of it lovely, and all serve to show what the next generation of racers should look like.  It's too bad about the infrequent weird visual bugs, especially in the in-car views. Floating gauges and highlights from the environment looked to be pasted on the windshield at times, like weird decorative stickers. Other times I saw floating semi-transparent boxes obscuring the race view in first-person modes, sometimes way in the distance, and others just at the corner of my view. When glitches distract from or obscure the player's view like this, it's hard to overlook them. But it always sounds good. The sound coming from some of the cars in Driveclub is so good that gear heads might fight themselves salivating. Engines roar convincingly, always making beautiful noise as you race. Equally impressive is the treatment of car sounds to fit the visuals. The in-car views in particular have it sounding like the car's machinery is just beyond the monitor.  For racing wheel fans, Driveclub only supports PS4-compatible wheels.  Driveclub is fast and easy to get into, nice to look at, and it has a lot going on in the background to keep you connected and competitive with your club members and other individuals. But that doesn't change the issues in the foreground. Its approachable and enjoyable racing is marred by AI cars that love to unfairly bash and crash on the single-player side. And bugs with the interface and the networking kept me from fully enjoying the multiplayer side. Beyond all of this, it feels like Driveclub needs more race and event types. What it offers has kept me going for a couple of weeks, but how much longer will it continue to do so? It's then fitting that Driveclub will be offered in a free form for PlayStation Plus users. The offering gives players about a fifth of the full game's total cars and tracks, but is otherwise unlocked for exploration both offline and on. Players can see for themselves if Driveclub has enough to offer over other new and upcoming racing alternatives out there.
Driveclub review photo
In the Club
Driveclub was supposed to be a launch day title for the PS4, but it was delayed for a while, pushing back until now. We got our hands on it at the E3 following the PS4 announcement last year and thought it needed more time in the oven, so a delay was actually welcome. But that was a long delay. So, how much of a difference has a year made? 

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Mevius Final Fantasy trademark filed in Europe


Gotta light?
Oct 06
// Dale North
The sharp eyes of NeoGAF have found a European Square Enix trademark for "Mevius Final Fantasy." The trademark covers games and merchandise, so this is probably some kind of videogame. I have no idea what a Mevius is, but I w...

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