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Review: Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster

May 10 // Dale North
Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster (PS Vita, PS3 [reviewed])Developer: Square EnixPublisher: Square EnixReleased:  March 18, 2014MSRP: $39.99 The original Final Fantasy X was and still is a great game. It took the franchise to a new place with its fully voiced scenes, strong storytelling, and visual flair. Its story, which follows summoner Yuna on her journey across the world of Spira to fight Sin, is one of Square Enix's best. Likable characters with memorable outfits, a fantastic musical score, and a powerful ending made this game one of the best role-playing games of the PS2 era. All of these positive aspects hold their value even today in this remake, though some other parts of the game haven't aged as nicely. While it was fully engaging so many years ago, Final Fantasy X's turn-based battle system now seems a bit simplistic compared to more recent JRPGs. Its true turn-based nature leaves the player open for careful decision making, it pales a bit when put up against even other newer franchise games where action is the focus. That said, there are still some great battles to be had in Final Fantasy X, and those that favor strategy over action will certainly enjoy this flash from the past. While Square Enix has spent a fair bit of time on upgrading the visual side of Final Fantasy X, they weren't able to change how cameras used to work in older RPGs during exploration. Set backdrops have the camera jumping abruptly between two scenes, which can be disorienting during exploration, and sometimes downright confusing when navigating dungeons. We're spoiled by modern RPGs where the camera will automatically pan and follow the character. But, current-day RPGs could learn a thing or two from Final Fantasy X. I appreciate that it wastes no time getting the player into real battles, and that it isn't scared to put some early pressure on players. Players are given full access to the game's systems, with little in the way of training wheels or babying. Its directness is somewhat refreshing, and its lack of complicated systems makes it seem more like a pure role-playing experience. One of its systems, the Sphere Grid, is open from the beginning for the taking. Using earned AP from battles to move through a sort of game board to collect abilities and increase powers is fun. This remake adds an Advanced Sphere Grid (from the international version), which brings even deeper levels of exploration and customization. Its navigation is more open and free, which gives the player more freedom to shape characters' powers. Final Fantasy X was always a nice looking game, but Square Enix's overhaul has added so much more visual appeal. I'm pleased to say that this isn't some quick upscale job. They took the time to upgrade backdrops, textures, lighting, user interfaces, and more, and it definitely shows. Spira has never looked better. If you've played Final Fantasy X more than a few times, you'll appreciate how it seems like you're seeing the game's varied locales for the first time. Details pop out, and foreground set pieces have been shined to a polish. Hats off to Square Enix for completely overhauling the character models of the game's main characters. A critical eye will catch that the new Tidus, Yuna, Wakka, and others still have some corners cut in places, but these models still hold up nicely when compared to newer 3D Japanese role-playing games. I'd bet that there's not a series fan out there that won't appreciate their reworking. The cutscenes have been revamped for HD resolution and look great. Some seem like they've been cropped to fit, but the scenes don't really suffer for it. They look and sound great despite being over ten years old now. But there's a slight downside to the visual upgrades in that they sometimes serves to highlight the smaller bits that have not received the upgrade treatment. While the foreground elements of scenes sport shiny new textures, pieces in the background are still made of lower resolution ones, making them look blurry in comparison. The shortcuts stick out, too. In one early scene, crowds of townspeople were made up of a mix of polygonal models and pre-rendered animations. They didn't blend, making this background detail a distraction. For the character models, while your eyes are drawn to their faces in close-up scenes, looking at anything else kind of ruins the magic. Some of the lower parts of the models, like their clothing or legs, appeared to use less polygons than their upper halves. The higher quality main character models never looked right up against second tier characters and NPCs, as other characters did not receive similar visual upgrades. Scenes can jump between a main character and a NPC, showing a high quality face one minute, and then another that looked to use one flat texture for a face. You can't help but feel that all the rest of Spira was cheated. While the HD resolution upgrade works against the whole on occasion, the improvements are mostly excellent, and greatly appreciated. The music has also seen an overhauling, though the changes might be less agreeable to fans of the original score. For the most part, the quality of sound has improved greatly, though some of the choices for certain instruments seem odd. For example, some of the more brassy instruments stick out of the mix against other higher quality sounds. However, most songs sound great. Final Fantasy X still has one of the greatest role-playing game scores ever created, so a few odd patches aren't that big of a problem in the end. It has been quite awhile since I last played Final Fantasy X. I forgot how challenging some of the battles are, how great it felt to acquire and use a character's ultimate weapon, and how high the random encounter rate was. I also forgot how strange this game is in places (Blitzball, thongs, swimming with boots on, an so on) and how much I loved some of the cutscenes. I'm happy to have been able to play Final Fantasy X again; it was a nice upgraded trip down memory lane. I enjoyed Final Fantasy X so much that I was sad to see it end. So when spin-off/sequel Final Fantasy X-2 came along, I was more than ready to jump back into the world of Spira. When I was finally able to play it, I was surprised to find that it featured a different tone, brand new systems, and completely different gameplay. Despite all this, it still ended up being one of my favorite games of the PS2 era. The sphere-hunting antics of Yuna, Rikku and Paine are as entertaining as ever in the HD remaster of Final Fantasy X-2. The mission-based gameplay is a departure from its predecessor's mostly linear progression, but there's plenty of fun to be had in exploring Spira. The new visual upgrades and gameplay features easily make this the best Final Fantasy remaster yet. The battle system of Final Fantasy X-2 holds up well, though it is still too easy to create a powerful class combination to breeze through just about any battle. By my measure, the balance is off; smart players will be able to walk through this game after earning the right equipment. Still, even with the broken balance, X-2 manages to entertain. The Dressphere job system spin-off is still great after all these years, and the mid-battle magical transformations are just as funny as you remember, though they look much better now with their upgraded visuals. Some new dresspheres have been added to the mix; their transformation and attack animations are hilarious and worth seeking out. New Garment Grids have also been included. Final Fantasy X-2's remaster brings along with it the international release gameplay additions. The new Creature Creator is pretty good fun for fans of collecting. Enemies can be captured and trained to be used in battle, but I found that capturing NPCs was even more enjoyable. It's like a complete game within another game with the full ability to customize creatures with different skills. Properly collecting and leveling enemies and NPCs gives you more story bits and sometimes even character-specific endings. Last Mission is a separate game mode that has the heroines working through a tower crawl and a series of bosses to reveal new story elements as play rewards. This game ditches X-2's free customization and open exploration for straight-ahead gameplay that requires careful choices and smart strategy. Last Mission definitely speaks to me as a fan of rogue-likes, but it may not have as much appeal to fans of your typical Final Fantasy game. Compared to the Final Fantasy X remaster, X-2 HD seems more inconsistent. While the upgraded character models are even higher quality than those of Final Fantasy X, the NPCs look even worse alongside them. Close-ups of these NPCs are pretty rough in cutscenes. Background textures are also inconsistent; it doesn't take much sleuthing to realize it. But, when it looks good, it looks really good. The character models seem to sport even more polygons than they did in the remaster of Final Fantasy X. Faces are more filled out, eyes move more realistically, and mouth animations look spot-on. The girls appear to have more makeup on, too. The lighting and spell effects in particular are great, making X-2 look like a current-gen JRPG at times. Oh, and I forgot how great the X-2 opening cutscene was. This J-Pop video of laser beams and hot pants is one for the ages, so I'm really glad it got the remaster treatment. I still think that Final Fantasy X-2's soundtrack is delightfully dorky with its action themes and singers though. It holds up nicely today and fits the game's tone perfectly. Unlike Final Fantasy X, it doesn't sound like they changed much other than a bump for the sound quality. Overall, I think Final Fantasy X-2 looks and feels better than Final Fantasy X. But, unfortunately, it also does not let you pause or skip cutscenes, and there are times when voice and animation synchronization gets off track. The game's frame rate would dip in some dungeons, though never to a terrible number. Admittedly, X-2 is a bit of a hot mess, but I've always loved this game. This remaster has made it even more enjoyable with its new look and content additions. It's not as lovingly crafted as Final Fantasy X is overall, but it makes up for that in pure entertainment value. As far as videogame remasters go, Final Fantasy X and X-2 are at the top of the list as far as quality is concerned. It's clear that Square Enix put a lot of time into both of these beloved titles, and as a series fan I really appreciate that. They've made both of these great games even better with this remastering, and any fan of either should definitely check them out.
Final Fantasy X & X-2 photo
Praise be to Yevon!
Y, R, P -- in position. It's showtime, girls. 

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Resident Evil goes manga, serves as a prequel to Resident Evil 6


New title from Viz Media
Oct 17
// Dale North
Resident Evil goes manga in a new series from Viz Media. Resident Evil: The Marhawa Desire serves as a prequel to Capcom's Resident Evil 6, created by Naomi Serizawa. The 5-volume series launches November 18 on Viz's Signatur...
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Project Cars delayed to March 2015


Traffic delays
Oct 17
// Dale North
Bandai Namco sends word that Slightly Mad Studios' upcoming racer, Project Cars, has been pushed back to March 20, 2015. This goes for all versions: PS4, Xbox One, and PC.  They say the move helps them break away from th...

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Here's another one of these things: $99 Google Nexus console


Goole goes set-top
Oct 16
// Dale North
Google's new Nexus Player is an Android-based $99 set-top game console / video box. Well, disc. It's round. Crazy brilliant idea, right? An Atom processor at 1.8Ghz (quad core), 1GB of RAM, and 8GB of storage will let you pla...
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Final Fantasy and World of Warcraft composers join up for a concert


Coming to Naka-Kon in Overland Park, Kansas
Oct 16
// Dale North
Final Fantasy composer Nobuo Uematsu and World of Warcraft composer Jason Hayes are teaming up with their respective bands, The Earthbound Papas and Critical Hit, to perform live at Naka-Kon in Overland Park, Kansas this Nove...
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Guilty Gear Xrd Sign dated for December 16 in North America


Preorder now
Oct 16
// Dale North
Aksys announced that fighter Guilty Gear Xrd -Sign- will be released on December 16 in North America, for both PS3 and PS4. That's just a couple of weeks after the Japanese release.  There will be standard and limit...
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OnLive brings free game play to Samsung Galaxy Note 4


Part of Galaxy Gift package
Oct 16
// Dale North
Cloud gaming service OnLive has partnered with Samsung to bring streaming games to Samsung Galaxy Note 4 users for free for three months as a part of a new Galaxy Gift package. This means that PC and console games from OnLive's PlayPack bundle can be streamed right to that big ol' phone over any Wi-Fi or 4G connection. Do you have one of those huge phones?  
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Square Enix trademarks 'Masters of the Masks' in Europe


Hopefully a new IP
Oct 15
// Dale North
Masters of the Masks, eh? This trademark by Square Enix Europe is for a game, of course. But that's all we know. That's how it usually goes with these trademark things.  Any guesses? Something brand new, you think? Square Enix files trademark for 'Masters of the Masks' in Europe [AGB]

Is classic Survival Horror considered old fashioned now?

Oct 15 // Dale North
[embed]282542:55979:0[/embed] Survival horror games aren't that old. I did enjoy several of the early graphical adventures that had scary themes. Clicking around haunted houses wasn't nearly as interactive as, say, Resident Evil, but the chance for creepiness was still there and that was worthy of a play for this thrill seeker. Alone in the Dark still holds up, I'd say. Back in the PlayStation/Saturn era, the genre was still shaping up. Resident Evil got us rolling, Silent Hill started a sick craving, and games like Clock Tower and D served as a sort of bridge between games that gave us the creeps and ones that would actually make us jump out of our seats. The scares were there, but some of the stronger hooks that were soon to draw so many fans in were still budding. When we really got going, back in the early 2000s, you could find legitimate scares in games. I look back at those times fondly. Between the prior console generation's titles I missed and the new ones coming out, I had a steady IV drip of freaky experiences to work through. I played them all, too. The big ones like Clock Tower and Resident Evil weren't any more important to me than the less popular ones, like Dreamcast games Carrier and the not-so-hot Blue Stinger. Remember Haunting Ground? Rule of Rose? Both the Fatal Frame and Silent Hill franchises had my heart. And, oh man, Siren.  [embed]282542:55980:0[/embed] Recent talk about how survival horror is dying and giving way to scary action games scares me. Yes, tastes change, gamers change, and sales results speak. But I'd love to believe that there's a number of fans out there that still crave checking fifty doors to eventually find that one that has gruel-covered, multi-limbed baddies behind it. I'd love to believe that there is a group of fans that think that we need to get back to basics. That being helplessly lost in the fog is a million times better than shooting aliens with an overgrown nail gun.  I blame Resident Evil 4. But before you come after me with your "muerte" chants and sharp implements, know that I love this game as much as you do. I don't need to tell you how well it balanced the scares and combat equally, or how it launched a thousand memes. Hell of a game. But the problem was that it sold so well that Capcom began chasing sales numbers over scares. And then, like a flashlight flipped on in the dark, all the other game-making ghouls came out for a juicy hunk of their own. The genre hasn't been the same since. I'm not out to write the same piece Jim Sterling shared some years back as he did a fine job then. But has the situation continued to decline since then? Fatal Frame—the first game—hasn't aged well, I've just found. Neither have its early sequels, actually. Not on a technical level. Not to this games professional that has spent most of the last year with his face in shiny, polished, high-definition games. But nostalgia goes a long way, as do dark, gritty textures. The low-res murk of the earlier survival games are my puffy Nintendo clouds and dancing trees. Good feels. Great memories.  So I've been screaming at night this past week during my replaying of these games, waiting for The Evil Within to come out. I'm usually playing late at night when everything is quiet and dark. It doesn't matter that these games are old and haven't aged well or that I've played them many times before. I'm still quietly giggling at myself when I get wrapped up in exploring the too-dark hallways or when the echo-y sound effects catch me off guard. I've wondered on several occasions this past week if I'm going to enjoy The Evil Within as much as I'm enjoying replaying these old PS2 games.  You can blame the market, or lazy developers, or disconnected management, but we've also changed. It feels like gamers are less open to being freaked out these days. I guess it's hard to ask players to come off their super powers, air strikes, and unlimited ammo and start playing something where your only defense is a camera. Or running away. I felt like the only person who liked Silent Hill: Shattered Memories back in 2009. While I was singing its praises, others were downplaying it for having no combat, or worse, for being on the Wii. Who cares?! I have fond memories of sweating, running (virtually) scared for my life. For me, that makes for an outstanding survival horror. I feel like a few bad eggs have people writing off modern-day horror games. Not-scary games, or scary-for-the-wrong-reasons re-releases. Resident Evil 5 was one of the biggest disappointments of the genre for me. Fun game? I guess. But not even close to scary. Nothing's scary about a co-op buddyfest. And that probably bummed out a lot of fellow survival horror fans off expecting another Resident Evil 4. But this doesn't make Silent Hill: Homecoming a bad game, does it? Amnesia: The Dark Descent is still brilliant, right?  It's a mindset thing, too. That inverted movement system from the older top-down games would be called broken or at least cumbersome by today's gamer. For me, the challenging movement added to the tension. And it's the same for the slushy and slow combat systems of some of the PS2 survival horror games. Some may have hated it. I thought that it made perfect sense that these grotesque horrors from the underworld would be that difficult to take down. That low-res grit? That's an asset, not a tech problem!  I sometimes worry that our reviews and feedback from those old games we loved served as nails in the classic survival horror games coffin. Aside from the change in focus or mechanics, maybe it's just  that current-day horror games are less scary. There are lots of reasons why, too. Remember how every room in Fatal Frame 2 had its own camera angle? What you couldn't see made you just as nervous as any monster would. It just felt lovingly crafted. Regardless of how you felt about Silent Hill 4: The Room, you had to at least give it that they went above and beyond in making it feel really fucked up. Even now, this many years later, that game had some of the most disturbing imagery I've seen in a game.  [embed]282542:55981:0[/embed] There was a nice bunch of independent horror games that hit recently that give this old-fashioned gamer hope. Outlast and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs filled voids that those action-y games didn't. Even Slender did something for me. This year hasn't been the worst. If Alien: Isolation doesn't make you feel like you're going to piss yourself, I don't know what will. The jury is mixed on brand new Mikami release The Evil Within (review coming soon!), but it's something, right? But I'm holding out for something a lot like the survival horror classics. The next Silent Hill 2, if you will. Something with the spirit of Fatal Frame 2. Something that's not scared to go weaponless/powerless. Maybe we can revisit Japanese horror a bit more. How about way less action and way more fucked-up storylines about horrible orphanages. Try an openness to there being gamers out there who loved walking down a seemingly endless staircase for five minutes. Have some faith, game makers. Ditch the guns and the HUDs. Get with the wiggly mannequins.  [embed]282542:55978:0[/embed] Don't let me down, P.T. I got more out of that "interactive trailer" than I have with any other full horror game as of late. Until then, I'll go on with the late night replays of all of my favorites, continuing to milk them for all their scares until another good fix comes along. It's less about being stuck in the past and more about just needing more of what I love so much. Scare me, someone. Please.
Is Survival Horror dead? photo
Not scary anymore
I like to be scared. I'm not some kind of dark-obsessed weirdo, though. I just really enjoy the feeling of being tense or terrified, so much so that I used to think that there was something wrong with me. Maybe there is. A fe...

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Yeah, so that Tears to Tiara II review...


...
Oct 15
// Dale North
PS3 RPG Tears to Tiara II came out...yesterday. So, where is the review?  [cringe] That's my fault. It's busy season here at Destructoid, so I'm wrapped up with multiple reviews as of late. It's nowhere near Chris Carte...
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It looks like Sony will be launching an official eSports league


Starting in Spain, with other countries soon
Oct 15
// Dale North
Spanish site Gamereactor has details on what looks to be an official PlayStation League for eSports on the PS4. The PlayStation Official League initiative was created in Spain, with other countries following. The report says ...
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Here's what the Persona Q Premium and Limited editions will look like


I need!
Oct 15
// Dale North
The Velvet Room theme song started playing in my head as I began writing this news blurb this morning. Igor and friends would be glad to know that after all of these years (and games) that the song stuck. It's in there for go...
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Watch Vine on Xbox One starting today


Six seconds at a time
Oct 14
// Dale North
I almost made a Vine about Vine being on Xbox One. I was thinking about using Bruh or something, but ultimately decided against it.  I'm disgustingly addicted to Vine. Ask Brett Makedonski or anyone that has traveled wi...
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Atelier Escha & Logy Plus coming to PS Vita in Japan


Maybe us later, please?
Oct 14
// Dale North
Yes, this is another one of those "...in Japan" kind of posts, but Atelier Escha & Logy: Alchemists of the Dusk Sky is a fine video game, and an RPG coming to Vita is fine news. Uh, and while we're at it, my sinceres...
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Resident Evil: Revelations 2 release date is Feb. 17, says PS Store [Update]


Maybe
Oct 14
// Dale North
[Update: The official Resident Evil Twitter calls the date a placeholder and says that the true release date is still unconfirmed.] Are these things usually wrong? Wait, don't answer that. But the PlayStation Store is at leas...
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BRRUUAAAPPHH!


Pac-Man and the Ghostly Adventures 2
Oct 14
// Dale North
It's probably the 12-year-old in me that digs this new commercial for PAC-MAN and the Ghostly Adventures 2. Burping with force waves? Cool. Sound effect stand-ins for farts? Love it. The scream-y Ask Ketchum/Naruto voice over narrator? Tops, man.  Not going to lie: I've watched this more than once. I'm also pretty proud of my screenshot of the boy belching.
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Tales of Hearts R works just fine with PlayStation TV


Kick back
Oct 14
// Dale North
Vita game Tales of Hearts R works with PS TV, says Bandai Namco. This means you can enjoy the portable title on your larger TV screen.  Duh, you say? PS TV has what are basically the Vita's innards, and it is compatible ...
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WayForward and Amazon Game Studios team up on Til Morning's Light


Touch-based action adventure for Fire phone
Oct 14
// Dale North
Til Morning's Light was developed by WayForward in cooperation with Amazon Game Studios, and it's coming exclusively to the Fire phone.  So far we know that Til Morning's Light is set in a haunted New England mansion th...
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Show-off


Oct 13
// Dale North
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Zone Runners: Sonic-themed hip hop


This exists
Oct 13
// Dale North
Sonic-themed hip hop exists. Check out Zone Runners, a game music-inspired hip hop trio that just released their debut album of Sonic the Hedgehog type tunes. They run through a number of zones over the 11-track release, with...
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Test your might with the first 4K Ultra HD benchmark from 3DMark


Good luck!
Oct 13
// Dale North
You know that hammer carnival game where you hit the base as hard as you can to test your strength? I feel like every benchmark I try is like that. I hit it with all my might (new hardware, OS tweaks, etc.) and the damned thi...
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Bandai Namco announces Battleline: Steel Warfare


Upcoming PC free-to-play tank game
Oct 13
// Dale North
Check out the newest from Namco Bandai and Creant Studios, a free-to-play PC tank game called Battleline: Steel Warfare. It's coming to PC later this year, with a closed beta launching next month. If you want to get in on th...
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Sega fans, you should be watching the SeHa Girls anime


Dreamcast, Saturn, and Megadrive go to school
Oct 13
// Dale North
The first episode of the new Sega-themed anime Hi*sCool! SeHa Girls has launched. As a diehard Sega fan, and a gamer that still uses his Sega consoles, I watched this adaptation of a ridiculous light novel weekend and loved ...
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PlayStation Experience Event takes place in December in Las Vegas


You're invited
Oct 10
// Dale North
The very first PlayStation Experience will take place in Las Vegas on December 6 and 7. This is a community event that Sony says that they've been planning for awhile. A community event! Not some stuffy press event! Yes. It w...
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Disney Fantasia Music Evolved demo is out


Try it out!
Oct 10
// Dale North
I believe that Harmonix's Disney Fantasia Music Evolved is one of those games you'll have to experience for yourself to really get. You can read our previews and get some idea of how it made us feel, but I really think that t...
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Look at this super skinny gaming rig from PiixL, two inches thick


Straps to the back of your TV
Oct 10
// Dale North
I've hid my gaming/media PC rig behind or under my television for years. It's much easier these days with all of the small form factor boxes available.  But I don't care how lovely they make these things; I'm still hidin...
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Get hype with this Japanese PS4 title lineup video


BIIGU TIETORU!
Oct 09
// Dale North
This new Japanese PlayStation 4 commercial shows off a lot of the upcoming games. You might be excited about some of them. Watching it, I was like: yes. Yep. Oh yeah. Yep, that too. Uh-huh. They lost me a bit with a couple o...

The game trailers with the most feels

Oct 09 // Dale North
[embed]282327:55914:0[/embed] The Last Guardian It was at Tokyo Game Show -- I know that. Was it 2009? 2010? Whatever. I remember this clearly: what felt like a floor-to-ceiling display played the debut trailer. Full-blast sound, brilliant color. It stopped me in my tracks. I instantly fell in love with the dog/bird thing. This one. This super cute, cheery one. But the E3 one. Oh, wow. Even now, something about this trailer makes my heart rate slow. I breathe deeper. It's quite a bit more emotional than the TGS one. It makes you feel something. The final shots gave me goosebumps, even today as I put this piece together. The spears in its back get me every time. This game is going to fuck me up if it ever comes out.    [embed]282327:55915:0[/embed] Final Fantasy Tactics When did we first see this? I don't remember. Was it a bonus trailer on a disc? Something like that. Anyway, I watched it hundreds of times. It had me from the spinning crystal and that adaptation of the Final Fantasy "Crystal Theme." The music picks up quickly and then the "The Lion War!" text pops up, hammering in the hype. Then, that phased chorus brings us back into the Crystal Theme. Short, sweet, perfect.  This trailer sold me on the game. 100% effective.   [embed]282327:55917:0[/embed] Metal Gear Solid 2 Prediction: you forgot how great this trailer was. You're completely gone from three seconds in, thanks to that haunting vocal.  What's amazing about this trailer is that the hype holds for over nine minutes, all the way through to the majestic wall-of-strings theme ending. It doesn't let go. I think trailers these days are mostly shit. This is how you do a videogame trailer.    [embed]282327:55918:0[/embed] Dead Island This Dead Island trailer did nothing for me. Maybe I have no soul. Maybe I saw the future and knew we'd be tired of zombies. But there is no way that I would leave it off this list as it resonated with so many. Destructoid's staff was extremely vocal about it needing to be in this article. So here it is. Have you seen it reversed?   [embed]282327:55922:0[/embed] Gears of War The "Mad World" ad for Gears of War proved so popular that the song from it hit #1 on the iTunes charts soon after its release. Microsoft and Epic were surprised at how effective the ad was. The song really made the whole thing. It's amazing what a song can do.   [embed]282327:55923:0[/embed] Dead Space Speaking of songs, "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star" was never as fucked up as it was in that early Dead Space trailer. Wow, that was some dark shit, right? The original words and that very end where the singer's voice wavers really make this one stick in your head.   [embed]282327:55929:0[/embed] Silent Hill 4: The Room I felt darkness wash over me the first time I saw the debut trailer for Silent Hill 4: The Room. Testing today, it still works on me.  The moaning and hazy imagery still freak me out. That floating with the shadow? Holy fuck! Yikes! This was an all-new kind of dark for the franchise. The trailer accurately conveyed the game's feelings of solitude and confusion. I loved you so much back then, Konami.    [embed]282327:55927:0[/embed] Smash Bros. Brawl Though the new one is no slouch, the Smash Bros. Brawl trailer from E3 2006 was super-powered original steam engine on the hype train. When that choir kicks in you feel it in your bones. That shot of Mario with his hands out, shaking his head in a power-fueled rage? I do the same thing when watching this trailer. This is a work of art.   [embed]282327:55916:0[/embed] Kingdom Hearts The king of them all. In my eyes, this is the pinnacle of game trailers that make you feel something. Today, even after all of these years, after pressing play on the video to verify it was the right one, goosebumps started at my toes and went to the very top of my head. My eyes watered up. What the hell is wrong with me?
Trailers with feels photo
A round-up of the best
I'm easy. And I think you are, too. Those debut game trailers get me every time. It usually goes like this: Stirring, slow beds of strings and woodwinds underlay a dramatic shot; an extreme closeup of some unknown character. ...

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Rakuen's first trailer is so sweet


Laura Shigahara's upcoming game
Oct 09
// Dale North
Laura Shigihara, composer and musician behind the Plants vs. Zomies and To The Moon soundtracks, has her own game coming up. She describes Rakuen as a mix between Maniac Mansion, The Legend of Zelda: Link...
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Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series hints 'Ironwoods'


Ironwoods
Oct 09
// Dale North
Look at this brand new tweet from Telltale Games. Ironwoods, eh? What does that mean for their upcoming Game of Thrones game? Well, besides hard trees. And how does it relate to the earlier Forrester hint they dropped awhile back?

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