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Mighty No. 9 photo
Mighty No. 9

Rock and piano covers of the Mighty No. 9 theme


Since we can't call him 'Blue Bomber,' how about 'Mighty Mauler'?
Sep 07
// Tony Ponce
Is anyone else playing and replaying the Mighty No. 9 Kickstarter video and jamming out to the theme song? Because that is totally what I'm doing. It's so great to hear Mega Man 1 composer Manami Matsumae hard at work again,...
Link's Awakening photo
Link's Awakening

Link's Awakening's jams get chopped for MeowMeow & BowWow


A fresh Zelda remix EP straight out of GameChops
Sep 07
// Tony Ponce
While some of us were attending PAX and getting all the ladies, others were back home, hard at work in the studio. My buddy Dj CUTMAN produced a brand new Zelda EP through his net label GameChops, and it's ready for mass cons...
The Daily Hotness photo
The Daily Hotness

The Daily Hotness: 'The Passing of the Blue Crown'


Check out everything Destructoid did today
Sep 06
// Tony Ponce
Today, I finally posted my PAX interview with Keiji Inafune, in which we discuss the Mega Man past and the Mighty No. 9 future. That gives me an excuse to share the above heartfelt comic by tumblr user shwlg. You can view the...

Keiji Inafune dropped mad Mega Man secrets on me

Sep 06 // Tony Ponce
Sitting all cool and collect in the corner of the room was Inafune, and at his side to serve as interpreter was former Capcom head of localization, Ben Judd. Filling out the room were various others project associates as well as a film crew capturing my every awkward second on camera. Oh God, if any of that footage shows up in the Mighty No. 9 making-of documentary, I will shut myself in a hole for weeks. I could feel my breakfast churning; I willed it to stay down. I naturally was wearing my limited-numbered Mighty No. 9 T-shirt, handed out to attendees of Inafune's panel the day prior. To say that everybody there was surprised by his Kickstarter reveal would be the understatement of the year. The room erupted like Mount Vesuvius when the plucky android Beck made his grand debut. That ball started rolling just this past spring. As Inafune recalled, "It really was a culmination of... everywhere I've gone in the past, after I left Capcom, fans would come up to me or media people would talk to me and they'd say, 'Oh, I loved Mega Man!' or, 'I loved Onimusha!' I don't know whether they were just being nice, but they really felt extremely passionate every time they'd say that. I'm sure they knew I wasn't at Capcom anymore and couldn't make it. It still stood that, obviously, their feelings were that they wanted something new but that had that classic feeling, and they wanted it out of me, but obviously there weren't many opportunities. "However, when I learned of Kickstarter, it seemed a great way that I could first and foremost connect with the fans who were the people that kept talking to me about, 'Hey, you should do this! You should do this! You should do this!' This would allow me to eventually bridge that gap and do it with them directly, number one. Number two, the best thing about Kickstarter is you can launch something and you can see what the reaction is, and if the reaction isn't good then, you know, maybe that was just a few remote individual cases of people saying that." The immediate reaction was beyond positive -- the Kickstarter goal was already half met by the morning of my interview, and it was fully cleared not long after that. "By seeing the overall fan reaction, obviously that's not the case. The people that I met with up until now were a cross section of a larger group of people that really want something like this." Seems like a lesson Capcom ought to take to heart! Speaking of Capcom, Inafune was a bit hesitant to discuss his former employer and the treatment of the franchise he helped build. "Honestly, I created a policy after I left Capcom that any Mega Man games that would come out I would not play, because the second I play them, I'm going to formulate an opinion, will probably get very emotional, may not be in a good way. So sometimes ignorance really is bliss when it comes to how your creations are used after you no longer have control of them." I of course had to ask if he was aware of Rockman Xover, to which he responded in the affirmative. He hasn't touched it per his self-imposed policy. That's for the best, don't you think? Outside of Capcom, we have ambitious fans working hard on unofficial titles, like Mega Man Unlimited and the demake of Mega Man Legends 3: Prototype Version , many of which rival the quality of Capcom's own efforts. Considering how Mighty No. 9 and the Legends 3 project were both conceived as a way for developers and fans to work together towards a common goal, I gauged that Inafune would greatly admire fan game makers' efforts. "If you are a fan and you really want to make something like that that you love, then I think you should make it. Obviously that's going to be what makes you happy." Fairly decent response, but it's what he said next that I found extremely admirable. "But if I was an IP holder and I saw that there was somebody that was that impassioned to work with the content, that they were willing to dedicate their own time and energy and potentially money to make it, then I think the smarter approach would be to contact them and see if there wasn't a way to do a project with them, very much like Kickstarter, get them somehow involved in it so that it really is you as a creator being [able] to make sure that you're controlling the quality and direction and stuff like that, but also getting lots of good fan input and really finding a perfect blend between fan and creator to make something very unique." To Capcom's credit, the support of Street Fighter X Mega Man demonstrated some of that joint interaction. Also consider SEGA's recent Sonic CD and Sonic 1 remasters, which were spearheaded by members of the Sonic fan game community. Inafune sees the benefit of such close relationships with fans, and I hope this attitude spreads even further throughout the industry. This line of action of course stems from Inafune's dissatisfaction with Japanese game companies, leading to no shortage of damning remarks. But whether you think he's blowing smoke or has legitimate concerns, we can at least agree that his words are fueled by a desire to see the Japanese industry regain some of the influence and might it lost over the past few years, hence why he aims for evolution and innovation through his companies comcept and intercept. Rather ironic that two of his current projects are a Ninja Gaiden spin-off and a Mega Man spiritual successor. But to be fair, he seems to believe that there is just as much room for innovation in the development process as there is in games themselves, which would explain the unorthodox foundations lying beneath Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z and Mighty No. 9. By the way, you may remember another project that Inafune is heading: the high-seas 3DS adventure Kaio: King of Pirates. Though the game was originally scheduled for a 2012 release then later pushed back a year, its current status is a mystery. Is it vaporware? According to Inafune, the situation is out of his hands. Publisher Marvelous has not announced a strategy for the game, thus any inquiries concerning Kaio would have to go through them. This situation reminds me of Yuji Naka's Rodea the Sky Soldier and its extended period of silence. Publisher Kadokawa recently re-confirmed the game's existence, so I have hope that Marvelous will make a similar statement in the near future. Inafune may have harsh words for his Japanese brethren, but he's still supportive of those companies that attempt something a little more offbeat. Like, say, using his real-world likeness in a rather significant capacity. I'm talking about Idea Factory and the inclusion of Inafune as a laser-spewing summon in the Hyperdimension Neptunia series and as the main character's uncle in the visual novel Sweet Fuse. More bizarre than the typical cameo, no? "We got this idea," Idea Factory said to him. "We kind of like you to be in the game as a character." They didn't think he'd agree to it, but Inafune was so pleased by their wild initiative that he responded with an emphatic,"Sure, let's do it! Why not? Sounds crazy and fun and new! At least we're doing something new!" Is that innovation? Inafune believes so, but I don't think anyone else would say the cameos aren't at least bizarrely entertaining. I also took a moment to inquire about his thoughts regarding PlatinumGames, considering their shared history at Capcom. "I think that they are a very talented group of people," he mused. "I've known them when they were all at Capcom and we were working together, so it's really hard to say what their strengths and weaknesses are, certainly in an interview like this. But I think that they have their own style and they're really good at that style. It's different from how I would necessarily build out or develop a game, but I think it certainly works for them and allows them to create something that's very unique and cool for sure. "I guess if I was going to say there's one area for improvement, maybe it's on how they produce things. They're great at building out great games, but they never really seem to hit the sales marks that they need to, so that gap needs to be decreased, shortened by stronger producers, etc. That will make their games hit a wider audience." By this point in the interview, I was ready to pull out the big guns and seek answers to some long-standing Mega Man mysteries. I didn't get to ask as many of your questions as I would have liked, but I guarantee you'll be amazed at some of these responses nonetheless. One of the weirdest things about playing NES games was how staff was listed by nicknames in the credits, and Inafune in particular was known as"Inafking." Where did that name come from, and why were some of the other names so strange? "There was a series called Moomin. It was an older series from a long time ago, and there was a character named 'Snufkin' in it that's this cool character. So 'Snufkin' and 'Inafking,' they're kind of like, oh, we're both these cool characters, this is how I like it! "Back then, of course, all the more talented programmers, artists, etc. could have been headhunted, so the one internal rule was you have to come up with a name that is different enough that people won't know what your real name is. So long as you fulfill that criteria, you can be as crazy as anything, so everyone just went crazy and made whatever name they wanted to." Regarding names, there has been confusion over whether the robo-dog Rush was named after the famous Canadian band. Inafune put the confusion to rest: "People think that most of the names were some sort of music-based names, but really Rock and Roll were only the key ones that were based on musical terms. If you think of Dr. Wily and Dr. Light, that's got nothing to do with music. "I'm sorry to disappoint the fans, but actually Rush was not based on the band, Rush was based on a Capcom game called Rush & Crash [known as The Speed Rumbler outside of Japan -- Tony] that I really liked. Actually, the word 'Rush' sounds kind of like 'Lassie' [pronounced 'Rasshu' and 'Rasshi']. Back then, Lassie was a very popular movie about a dog, of course, so it just fit as far as the phonetic flow of the word." Videogame character designs of yesteryear were often the result of hardware limitations. Mega Man was no different; the "exclamation mark" protrusion on his helmet was one such element born of Inafune trying to draw around those constraints. "This is probably a little known fact... it's true that I did not design Mega Man, but what happened was there was a planner [confirmed to be Akira Kitamura, credited as A.K. in Mega Man 1 and 2] that whenever they made a Famicom character, they had to look at it on the screen and see how it popped, whether it was visible, whether you can play as it and it would pop off of the background. This planner put together a pixel character that really had good read against the Famicom backgrounds, then went to me and said, 'Okay, I want you to make a character that looks like [a] Famicom graphic could have come from that character.' "So it was like a reverse character design, the fact that Mega Man's birth came from this pixelized character that the planner initially created, but the actual animation, the rendition of him as a character I did create. But I had to look at the pixels and try to envision what that would look like as a character, and all you can see from the pixels was that, okay, this was where the helmet was, then it looks like there's a line. And that's all you can really tell. So when you're going to design a character, I literally could have put a triangle here or a square or an equal sign, it could have literally been whatever. So I just put what I thought matched well with the line, but it wasn't intentionally meant to be an exclamation mark or anything like that, unfortunately." Some designs elements have more cultural origins. You may have noticed that many Mega Man series characters hold up this odd "W" hand gesture in the official art. This is Inafune's signature flourish, but no one really knew why he chose to draw hands that way... until now! "First of all, doing this [throws up the hand gesture] looks cute! If you look at Disney characters, a lot of times they have three fingers or bigger fingers that makes them look kind of cute. In Japan, 'four' is a bad number, it means death, even though all of us as humans have four fingers [excluding the thumb]. Doing something like this which shows three makes it a safe number... "There's some sort of weird prejudice that comes in... some bad meaning if you have four fingers instead of five. But by doing it this way, it would look kind of Disney-esque and cute, but you could still say that it was a perfect normal hand, they've got five fingers. Technically, it could have been these two fingers [index and middle] spread out like this or the end two fingers if you can do that, but doing it in the middle is just better balance wise." After that final question, I nervously pulled out my boxed copy of the original Famicom Rockman, had him sign it, and made my way out the room in what I hope was the most natural way possible. It probably wasn't, but I can only maintain some semblance of professionalism for so long. Keiji Inafune, guys. Guys. Keiji Inafune. His brutal honesty about the game industry may not sit well with everyone, but c'mon! He's Keiji Inafune!
Keiji Inafune interview photo
I met the legendary Inafking once more for an unforgettable interview
Keiji Inafune, are you Kamen Rider? "As a child, of course, I watched lots of Kamen Rider, so I love that show, but I unfortunately cannot definitively say that I have experience being the masked rider. But I may at one tim...

Keiji Inafune @ PAX photo
Keiji Inafune @ PAX

Watch all of Keiji Inafune's 'mighty' PAX panel


Sorry, no T-shirt for you
Sep 06
// Tony Ponce
Keiji Inafune won PAX Prime 2013, no contest. If you attended PAX and didn't go to his panel, you missed out on being able to personally witness the biggest middle finger to ever be waved in Capcom's general direction. Of co...
Olimeat and Porkmin photo
Olimeat and Porkmin

PAX highlight: Olimeat and Porkmin


Pikmin are only $2.99 a pound! What a deal!
Sep 04
// Tony Ponce
I'm slowly recovering from a wild and crazy PAX weekend. I've been to PAX East twice in the past, but this was my first time attending Prime. It was beyond a doubt the most emotionally polarizing con I have ever attended, fil...
Level-5 game sales photo
Level-5 game sales

Layton series has sold over 15 million units


Level-5 also reveals sales of Ni no Kuni, Inazuma Eleven, and the Guild games
Aug 28
// Tony Ponce
Level-5 has kicked the fans in the collective nuts with the complete tonal shift that is Layton 7. That must mean the games are on their last legs and can no longer make bank on Nintendo handhelds alone, right? Not likely if ...
Layton 7 photo
Layton 7

Layton 7 for 3DS and mobile is not MY Layton


This is how it starts
Aug 28
// Tony Ponce
I... I brought this upon myself. I said that Layton Brothers: Mystery Room was a great game. I said it was an excellent iOS companion to the traditional Layton series. I never should have had faith that a major gaming compan...
Sonic Lost World photo
Sonic Lost World

Sonic comic writer will play Lost World for charity


The 24-hour livestream will be held on October 26
Aug 28
// Tony Ponce
My homeboy David Oxford, writer at The Mega Man Network and and fellow editor on NF Magazine, has planned a special charity event alongside Ian Flynn, lead writer on Archie's Mega Man and Sonic the Hedgehog comic series. For ...
Rayman Legends photo
Rayman Legends

Legend of live-action Rayman


NIGHTMARES
Aug 28
// Tony Ponce
So this is a thing. Corridor Digital made a new SFX-driven action short based on Rayman Legends. Every role is played by a live actor save for Rayman. And Rayman is... ... uhhhhh... ... my God. It is a monster. The Legend of Rayman [YouTube]
The Weekend Hotness photo
The Weekend Hotness

The Weekend Hotness: Pimp daddy Inafune


Check out everything Destructoid did today
Aug 25
// Tony Ponce
The man, the myth, the legend, Keiji Inafune will be attending PAX. Hopefully when I meet him again, I won't do what I did at E3: back immediately out of the room, grab Max Scoville by the arm, and exclaim, "MOTHER F*CKIN' KE...
The Eevee EP photo
The Eevee EP

Pokemon: The Eevee EP pleases Charles Darwin


New OC ReMix album mocks God
Aug 25
// Tony Ponce
Did you know that Charles Darwin's theory of evolution was first published on August 20, 1858? OverClocked ReMix knew, which is why the music arrangement clan celebrated the monumental scientific event by releasing Pok&eacut...
AVGN Adventures photo
AVGN Adventures

Pre-order AVGN Adventures for a chance to be an NPC


You know what's NOT buuuuuuuullllllsh*t?
Aug 25
// Tony Ponce
Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures is up for pre-order on Steam, so if you're jonesin' for some turd blastin' on the PC rather than on the Wii U or 3DS, that's a thing you should do. In fact, do it before 1:00 PM EST on Septem...
New Super Luigi U photo
New Super Luigi U

Luigi, the parkour legend


Now THIS is an advertisement!
Aug 24
// Tony Ponce
When Nintendo actually puts forth an effort, it can achieve some amazing feats of marketing magic. You remember the live-action commercials for the Wii version of Punch-Out!!, right? Here's the next level: a documentary about the parkour legend Luigi in honor of New Super Luigi U. That goddamn Nabbit, though, I swear... Finding Luigi - Legend of Parkour [YouTube]

EarthBound's English editor talks about his masterpiece

Aug 24 // Tony Ponce
Working from an essentially context-free text file was, as he described, "like free-form jazz." But such freedom allowed him to whip up real magic -- the jokes and Easter eggs are basically all Lindblom. He named a character after his daughter Nico, used his wife's name as one of Paula's default names, and called Pokey's mom "Lardna" just because he felt like it. He also confirmed and disproved popular myths. For example, the "BH" in Onett mayor BH Pirkle's name does indeed stand for "Bald Head." Also, the fact that Giygas sort of looks like a baby fetus is a complete coincidence. There's more at the Kotaku link below, so do give it a read and show some love for the man who helped make one of your favorite games that much better. The Man Who Wrote Earthbound [Kotaku]
EarthBound photo
Marcus Lindblom is happy that his writing is now remembered fondly
With EarthBound tearing up the Wii U eShop and finding its way into some gamers' hearts for the very first time, those responsible for breathing life into that world can look back on their handiwork with pride. Series creator...

The Wonderful 101 photo
The Wonderful 101

The Wonderful 101 was almost a Nintendo crossover


Also, there are two super special secret hero characters
Aug 24
// Tony Ponce
Nintendo big boss Satoru Iwata recently brought PlatinumGames director Hideki Kamiya onto Iwata Asks to discuss The Wonderful 101. In a followup roundtable, a healthy chunk of the W101 development crew went into even greater ...
Pixel Art Controller photo
Pixel Art Controller

Impressions: Digging into Hyperkin's Pixel Art Controller


Did my palms survive!?
Aug 24
// Tony Ponce
Game accessory manufacturer Hyperkin recently announced the Pixel Art Controller line of PC / Mac gamepads. I took a look at the blocky SNES-inspired design and concluded that handling this hunk of plastic would have the same...
Keiji Inafune photo
There are no such things as stupid questions...
PAX attendees are in for a super special treat next week. The infamous Keiji Inafune will be delivering an hour-long panel in the Kraken Theater on Saturday from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM. He'll run through his 25-year industry care...

Game Center CX 3 photo
Game Center CX 3

Damn you, Japan! It's Game Center CX 3 on 3DS!


Where's our Retro Game Challenge 2!?
Aug 24
// Tony Ponce
I'm still extremely sore that Retro Game Challenge 2 was never localized. The original game, based off the brilliant Japanese "Let's Play before Let's Plays were a thing" TV program Game Center CX, was a retronaut's dream -- ...
Super Piano Brothers photo
Super Piano Brothers

Super Piano Brothers mash up Zelda and Final Fantasy


"To Zanarkudo Valley" melds Ocarina of Time with FFX
Aug 24
// Tony Ponce
["Tidus vs. Link" by lordrogersmith6485] The Asian sensation, the Super Piano Brothers, have been delivering stirring piano renditions and medleys of our favorite classic game tunes for around half a year now. Their latest ta...
The Daily Hotness photo
The Daily Hotness

The Daily Hotness: Freaky Constantina!


Check out everything Destructoid did today
Aug 23
// Tony Ponce
Thomas Truong wins the 1st Annual Podtoid Classic. In lesser news, we list our top 10 games of gamescom, Jordan and Conrad spelunk into madness, reviews for Madden 25 and Divekick! make our lives complete, Alessandro Fillari...
Super Mario Bros. 3 photo
Super Mario Bros. 3

Next-level art magic: The Super Mario Bros. 3 fresco


VERY YES
Aug 23
// Tony Ponce
Last month, digital artist Mikaël "Orioto" Aguirre made this happen. Now this is happening. Orioto is a classy fellow, and a classy game deserves to be treated like a classy lady. His Super Mario Bros. 3 fresco gives you...
Wind Waker HD photo
Wind Waker HD

Wind Waker HD's Hero Mode, fixed Triforce hunt, and more


What enhancements are in store for Link's return to the Great Sea?
Aug 22
// Tony Ponce
The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD won't arrive in the States and Europe until October -- along with a new Wii U bundle to boot -- but we have yet to learn all of what has been updated since its former life on the GameCub...
WOO-OO! photo
WOO-OO!

ScrewAttack's Craig and I sing DuckTales...


... along with a bunch of other people
Aug 22
// Tony Ponce
There was a special booth at E3 where you could sing the DuckTales theme. Capcom edited the footage into an entertaining montage proving that E3 attendees are all children in adult bodies. ScrewAttack's Stuttering Craig and ...
Chrono Trigger Symphony photo
Chrono Trigger Symphony

Gotta get back in time! Chrono Trigger Symphony is out


Grab the new fan album for eight bones
Aug 22
// Tony Ponce
I hope you enjoyed our little snippet of Blake Robinson's Chrono Trigger Symphony, because now it's time for the real thing! The first volume of the three-part fan symphony is live on Loudr and iTunes for $7.99, less than wha...
Sonic Lost World photo
Sonic Lost World

Sonic Lost World special edition features NiGHTS bosses


Pre-order nets you the NiGHTMARE DLC for free
Aug 22
// Tony Ponce
A new trailer for Sonic Lost World has surfaced, running through a list of features previously not seen. Sonic skates on icy surfaces, and Sonic 3 elemental shields like bubble and lightning can be shared via Miiverse, as ca...
Smash Bros. 3DS photo
Smash Bros. 3DS

You can remove the outlines in Smash Bros. 3DS


Also, first image of Wii Fit Trainer and Villager on 3DS
Aug 22
// Tony Ponce
Two major things distinguish the 3DS and Wii U versions of Smash 4: the levels, of which there will be a different set for each platform, and the bold outlines on the 3DS character models. The logic behind the latter design c...
Aksys 3DS and Vita sale photo
Aksys 3DS and Vita sale

Aksys throwing a sale on 3DS and Vita digital shops


Save big bucks on Virtue's Last Reward, Muramasa, BIT.TRIP, and BlazBlue
Aug 22
// Tony Ponce
Atlus isn't the only company ringing in the start of a new school year. Aksys Games is also so pleased that all the little brats are sweating in a classroom where they belong that it decided to place a number of games on the ...
Chrono Trigger Symphony photo
Chrono Trigger Symphony

Sneak peek at Chrono Trigger Symphony fan album


First volume of three-part set releases tomorrow
Aug 21
// Tony Ponce
On August 22, 1995, Chrono Trigger released in the US and changed the RPG paradigm forever. Exactly 18 years later, Blake Robinson is paying tribute with Chrono Trigger Symphony: Volume 1, the first in a three-part set celebr...

Review: SteamWorld Dig

Aug 21 // Tony Ponce
SteamWorld Dig (3DS)Developer: Image & FormPublisher: Image & FormRelease: August 7, 2013 (EU / AU) / August 8, 2013 (US)MSRP: $8.99 In a steampunk Wild West populated by robots, young Rusty has inherited his Uncle Joe's mine. Ol' Joe apparently lost his life plunging the depths of the mine for its secrets, thus its up to his nephew to take up the pickaxe and continue the journey. SteamWorld Dig is sort of like an open-world Dig Dug. You must chisel away at the soil to create paths that descend ever deeper, all while avoiding underground obstacles such giant insects, falling stones, and pools of acid. Your field of vision is regulated by how much light you have remaining, so you must use your wall-climbing ability to regularly return to the surface and refill your lantern to avoid fumbling around in the dark. Topside is a mining town where you can exchange any ore you find for cash and in turn use the cash to purchase new items and upgrades. Sturdier pickaxes will allow you to break through tougher soil in fewer hits, pouch expansions will allow you collect more ore, and so on. [embed]260352:50089:0[/embed] Along the way, you'll enter special caves which offer more straightforward platforming challenges. Here you'll earn upgrades, like as a super jump, a drill arm to break through rocks that your pickaxe can't crack, or dynamite to blow away obstacles from a safe distance. Many of the upgrades are steam-powered, thus you must also mind your water reserves, which can only be refilled in underground pools or by picking up refills from fallen enemies. That's the gist of it, really. What keeps the journey so thrilling is how customizable it is. Rusty can dig in either of the four cardinal directions but only when he's standing on solid ground. Therefore, you have to chart a path that not only allows access to ore deposits but also provides a clear route back to the town. Do you wish to dig straight down, thereby missing out on money that could be spent towards simplifying your journey, or do you perform a more thorough job and waste precious lantern light? What results is a root-like labyrinthine of tunnels, chutes, and open expanses entirely of your creation; no two players' excavation work will be identical. How each person digs speaks volumes about their individual traits -- efficiency, curiosity, patience. It almost makes me wish that the game allowed for online progress sharing so that we could compare maps and play methods. It is actually possible to trap yourself should you dig without concern for your equipment or surroundings. Certain items such as ladders and teleporters can be your saving grace, but should your supply be exhausted, your only option is to self-destruct. You will respawn on the surface, but you'll incur a 50% cash penalty and any ores you were carrying will have to be retrieved at the site of your death. The total amount of ore in the game is limited, so though there's more than enough to purchase every upgrade, repeated carelessness could end your shopping spree. There's a lot to track and observe in SteamWorld Dig, but you can only understand its brilliance if you push forward through the grind, which may be easier for some than others. The first hour is definitely the hardest -- several swings are required to break through the soil using your weak starter pickaxe, and without the support of Rusty's later upgrades and techniques, progress is as slow and laborious as a real-life mining dig. Then there's the need to return to the surface. The further down you dig, the longer it takes to climb back out to refill your light or go shopping. Aside from the teleporters you purchase from the shop, you'll find a scant few pre-installed at specific depths. Though they make returning to town a lot easier, you'll still be forced to backtrack a significant stretch as you create distance between yourself and the most recent teleporter. The best you can do is make sure that the return path is as streamlined as possible. I admit that I felt pretty fed up with the game on a number of occasions precisely because of these shortcomings. Even so, the allure of what lay hidden beneath the surface compelled me onward. Soil gives way to a long-lost subterranean civilization, which then gives way to evidence of a world much more advanced then the one on the surface. Every hundred meters is some new surprise, some new revelation. There is a genuine allure to SteamWorld Dig, you just have to clear out the rubble to find it.
SteamWorld Dig review photo
Dig, dig, dig, dig, dig, dig, dig in your mine the whole day through
On paper, SteamWorld Dig sounds like the most mind-numbing slog that you could possibly imagine. The object of the game is to dig, exchange the minerals you unearth for better equipment, then dig some more. And when you think...


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